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8 records – page 1 of 1.

Adaptation of Advanced High R-Factor Bracing Systems into Heavy Timber Frames

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1760
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Author
Gilbert, Colin
Erochko, Jeffrey
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Quasi-Static
Cyclic Testing
Ductility
Damping Devices
R-factors
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5068-5077
Summary
Timber provides attractive earthquake performance characteristics for regions of high seismic risk, particularly its high strength-to-weight ratio; however, current timber structural systems are associated with relatively low design force reduction factors due to their low inherent ductility when compared to high-performance concrete and steel...
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Dynamic Evaluation of Hybrid Timber-Steel Moment-Frame Structure Using Resilient Slip Friction Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1756
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Application
Frames
Author
Valadbeigi, Armin
Zarnani, Pouyan
Quenneville, Pierre
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Application
Frames
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Resilient Slip Friction Joint
Damping
Base Shear
Displacement
Acceleration
Self-Centering
Moment-Resisting
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5031-5040
Summary
This study introduces a new resilient slip friction joint for framed hybrid structures. The proposed connection has a self-centring behaviour in addition to damping characteristic. This innovative Resilient Slip Friction (RSF) joint is replaced with the conventional beam to column connections. The RSF joint provides energy dissipation...
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Experimental Analysis of Wall Joints in Cross Laminated Timber Panels Requested by Cyclic Load

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2013
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)

Experimental Investigations of Post-Tensioned Timber Frames with Advanced Seismic Damping Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue464
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Smith, Tobias
Carradine, David
Di Cesare, Antonio
Carlo Ponzo, Felice
Pampanin, Stefano
Buchanan, Andrew
Nigro, Domenico
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Keywords
Damping
Energy Dissipation
Full Scale
Post-Tensioning
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2012
Research Status
Complete
Notes
March 29-31, 2012, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Summary
This paper describes initial experimental testing to investigate feasible sources of passive damping for the seismic design of post-tensioned glue laminated timber structures. These innovative high performance structural systems extend precast concrete PRESSS technology to engineered wood structures, combining the use of post-tensioning bars or cables with large post-tensioned timber members. The combination of these two elements provides elastic recentering to the structure while the addition of damping using a specialised energy dissipation system gives the desirable `flag shaped' hysteretic response under lateral loading. Testing has been performed on a full scale beam-column joint at the University of Basilicata in Italy in a collaborative project with the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. The experimental testing uses engineered wood products, extending the use of laminated veneer lumber (LVL) structures tested in New Zealand to testing of glue laminated timber (glulam) structures in Italy. Current testing is aimed at further improvement of the system through additional energy dissipation systems.
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Lateral Testing of Glued Laminated Timber Tudor Arch

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1722
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Arches
Author
Rammer, Douglas
Line, Philip
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Arches
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Full Scale
Lateral Load
Damping
Deformation
Failure Modes
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4638-4646
Summary
Glued laminated timber Tudor arches have been in wide use in the United States since the 1930s, but detailed knowledge related to seismic design in modern U.S. building codes is lacking. FEMA P-695 (P-695) is a methodology to determine seismic performance factors for a seismic force resisting system. A limited P-695 study for...
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State-Of-The-Art Review on Cyclic Behaviour of Connections Used in CLT Multi-Storey Buildings: Test Results and Modelling

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue472
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Branco, Jorge
Sousa, Hélder
Lourenço, Paulo
Ahvenainen, Julia
Aranha, Chrysl
Publisher
Dolnoslaskie Wydawnictwo Edukacyjne (DWE)
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Poland
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Monotonic Tests
Cyclic Tests
Strength
Damping Ratios
Language
English
Conference
International Conference on Structural Health Assessment of Timber Structures
Research Status
Complete
Notes
September 9-11, 2015, Wroclaw, Poland
Summary
A timber building made of cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels is a modular system where all panels are pre-cut in factory. On site, the single components are then assembled connecting the panels with mechanical fasteners, mainly angle brackets with nails and/or screws, hold-downs, metal plates and self-tapping screws. CLT wall panels are very rigid in comparison to its connections. Thus, connections play an essential role in maintaining the integrity of the structure providing the necessary strength, stiffness and ductility, and consequently, they need close attention by designers. However, there is still a lack of proper design rules for these connections, in particular under cyclic loads, mainly due to a large variety of connectors and connection systems. In this paper, the different properties of connections for CLT buildings, on both monotonic and cyclic behaviour, are described using recent works from different authors. From the bibliography, it is clear that experimental data, regarding both monotonic and cyclic tests, is required for the assessment of the performance of the CLT structural system attending to the interaction between rigid panels and connections. This work evidences results from experimental campaigns and numerical analysis regarding definition and quantification of the cyclic response of CLT connections. Examples regarding monotonic and cyclic tests aimed to evaluate cyclic behaviour of connections through physical parameters, such as the impairment of strength and the damping ratio, are presented and discussed.
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Static and Dynamic Properties of Retrofitted Timber Beams Using Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymers

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue797
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Beams
Author
Bru, David
Baeza, Francisco Javier
Varona, Francisco
García-Barba, Javier
Ivorra, Salvador
Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Beams
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Damping Ratio
Ductility
Natural Frequency
Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer
Pine
Reinforcement
Static Properties
Dynamic Properties
Modal Analysis
Four Point Bending Test
Bending Strength
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Materials and Structures
ISSN
1871-6873
Summary
A study on the static and dynamic properties of sawn timber beams reinforced with glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) is reported in this paper. The experimental program is focused on the behavior of unidirectional wooden slabs, and the main objective is to fulfill the service state limit upon vibrations using GFRP when an architectonical retrofitting project is necessary. Two different typologies of reinforcement were evaluated on pine wood beams: one applied the composite only on the lower side of the beams, while the other also covered half of the beams depth. For the dynamic characterization, the natural frequency, damping ratio, and dynamic elastic modulus were measured using two different techniques: experimental modal analysis upon the whole beams; and bandwidth method using smaller samples of the same material. The static characterization consisted on four point bending tests, where elastic modulus, bending strength and ductility were assessed. The lower composite had better ductility and bending strength. On the other hand, the U-shaped laminate showed higher stiffness but also at a higher material cost. However, it allowed some ductility, i.e. compressive plasticity, even in the presence of hidden knots. Both dynamic techniques gave similar results and were capable of measuring the structure stiffness, even if short samples were used. Finally, the changes on dynamic properties because of the GFRP did not jeopardize the dynamic performance of the reinforced timber beams.
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Tall Timber Buildings - A Preliminary Study of Wind-Induced Vibrations of a 22-Storey Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1662
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Wind
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Johansson, Marie
Linderholt, Andreas
Jarnerö, Kirsi
Landel, Pierre
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Wind
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Finite Element Model
Damping
Mass
Stiffness
Peak Acceleration
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 3657-3664
Summary
During the last years the interest in multi-storey timber buildings has increased and several medium-tohigh-rise buildings with light-weight timber structures have been designed and built. Examples of such are the 8-storey building “Limnologen” in Växjö, Sweden, the 9-storey “Stadthouse” in London, UK and the 14-storey building “Treet” in Bergen, Norway. The structures are all light-weight and flexible timber structures which raise questions regarding wind induced vibrations. This paper will present a finite element-model of a 22 storey building with a glulam-CLT structure. The model will be used to study the effect of different structural properties such as damping, mass and stiffness on the peak acceleration and will be compared to the ISO 10137 vibration criteria for human comfort. The results show that it is crucial to take wind-induced vibrations into account in the design of tall timber buildings.
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8 records – page 1 of 1.