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24 records – page 1 of 3.

Ability of Finger-Jointed Lumber to Maintain Load at Elevated Temperatures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1832
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Material
Other Materials
Author
Rammer, Douglas
Zelinka, Samuel
Hasburgh, Laura
Craft, Steven
Publisher
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
Other Materials
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Small Scale
Full Scale
Bending Test
Melamine Formaldehyde
Phenol-Resorcinol Formaldehyde
Creep
Polyurethane
Polyvinyl Acetate
Temperature
Durability
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood and Fiber Science. 50(1): 44-54.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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An Enhanced Beam Model for Glued Laminated Structures that takes Moisture, Mechano-sorption and Time Effects into Account

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue44
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Ormarsson, Sigurdur
Steinnes, Jan
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Keywords
Climate
Creep
Finite Element Model
Hygro-Mechanical
Long-term
Visco-Elastic
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
There is a need of more advanced analysis for studying how the long-term behaviour of glued laminated timber structures is affected by creep and by cyclic variations in climate. A beam theory is presented able to simulate the overall hygro-mechanical and visco-elastic behaviour of (inhomogeneous) glulam structures. Two frame structures subjected to both mechanical and cyclic environmental loading are analysed to illustrate the advantages the model involved can provide. The results indicate clearly both the (discontinuous) inhomogeneity of the glulam products and the variable moisture-load action that occurs to have a significant effect on deformations, section forces and stress distributions within the frame structures that were studied
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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An Innovative Hybrid Timber Structure in Japan: Experiments on the Long Term Behavior in Beam

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1767
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Serviceability
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Uchimura, Kohei
Shioya, Shinichi
Hira, Tomoka
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Serviceability
Keywords
Long-term
Mechanosorption
Creep
Steel Bars
Epoxy
Japan
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5234-5241
Summary
Hybrid composite glulam timber reinforced using deformed steel bars and epoxy resin adhesive (RGTSB), was significantly developed in Kagoshima University. A long term laboratory investigation on a 4.5-meter-span hybrid timber beam and a non-hybrid timber beam was started from August 2011. The beam was made of RGTSB and another was of conventional glulam timber...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Creep and Duration Of Load Characteristics of Cross Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue692
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Nakajima, Shiro
Miyatake, Atsushi
Shibuwasa, Tatsuya
Araki, Yasuhiro
Yamaguchi, Nobuyoshi
Haramiishi, Takeshi
Ando, Naoto
Yasumura, Motoi
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Cedar
Creep
Duration of Load
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
Creep and duration of load characteristics of cross laminated timber (CLT) were evaluated from the test results of creep and duration of tests. Japanese Ceder (Cryptomeria japonica) was chosen for the specie for the laminations of the test specimens and API was chosen for the adhesive. The results are summarized as follows: (1) The creep factor [i.e. (Initial deflection + Creep deflection) / Initial deflection] for CLT was evaluated to be 2.0 and was almost equivalent to the creep factor commonly known for solid lumber. (2) The duration of load factor [i.e. Strength for 50 years duration of load / Strength for 10 minutes duration of load] of CLT was evaluated to be 0.66 and was almost equivalent to the duration of load factor measured for solid lumbers.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Creep Behavior of Laminated Veneer Lumber from Poplar Under Cyclic Humidity Changes

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2480
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Moisture
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Li, Chao
Huang, Yuxiang
Publisher
North Carolina State University
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Moisture
Keywords
Mechanosorption Creep
Humidity
Four Point Bending Test
Adsorption
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
BioResources
ISSN
1930-2126
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Design, Construction, and Maintenance of Mass Timber Post-Tensioned Shear Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2791
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Application
Shear Walls
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Oregon State University
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Serviceability
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Self-Centering
Shear Walls
Anchoring
Creep
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Mariapaola Riggio at Oregon State University
Summary
Earthquake engineers are focusing on performance-based design solutions that minimize damage, downtime, and dollars spent on repairs by designing buildings that have no residual drift or “leaning” after an event. The development of timber post-tensioned (PT), self-centering rocking shear walls addresses this high-performance demand. The system works by inserting unbonded steel rods or tendons into timber elements that are prestressed to provide a compressive force on the timber, which will pull the structure back into place after a strong horizontal action. But, because these systems are less than fifteen years old with just four real-world applications, little information is known regarding best practices and optimal methods for engineering design, construction and/or tensioning procedures, and long-term maintenance considerations. This project intends to contribute knowledge by testing both cross-laminated timber (CLT) and mass plywood panel (MPP) walls through testing of anchorage detailing, investigating tensioning procedures for construction, determining the contributions of creep on prestress loss over time, and comparing all laboratory test data to monitoring data from three of the four buildings in which this technology has been implemented, one of which is George W. Peavy Hall at Oregon State University. This will be accomplished by testing small- and full-scale specimens in the A.A. “Red” Emmerson Advanced Wood Products Laboratory, and small-scale specimens in an environmental chamber.
Resource Link
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Evaluation and Optimization of the Vibration Behavior of CLT-Concrete Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2673
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Organization
Université Laval
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Finite Element Method (FEM)
Vibration Performance
Creep
Displacement
Natural Frequency
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Sylvain Ménard at Université Laval
Summary
Designers of large buildings generally want floor systems with large spans (9 m). These floors are often sized by the requirement of vibratory performance and, correlatively, deflection. The composite wood-concrete floors allow large spans with reduced static height. They are a promising alternative to simple concrete slabs. Objective 1 - Determine the evolution of the natural frequency of the CLT-concrete composite floor as a function of the stiffness of the connector, and correlate the experimental results with the model by the finite element method. Objective 2 - Parametric study of the vibration performance of the CLT-concrete composite floor. The impact of several parameters on the dynamic performance of the floor will be determined, especially the characteristics of the constituent materials, connector and the creep of the floor. Objective 3 - Build the metamodels for the study of multi-objective optimization optimization of a wood-concrete composite floor solution in relation to a regional problem in Aquitaine.
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Experimental Investigation on Long-term Axial Creep Performance of Pine, Spotted Gum and Laminated Veneer Lumber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2485
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Fire and Structural Performance of Non-Metallic Timber Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue152
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Connections
Fire
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Brandon, Daniel
Organization
University of Bath
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Thesis
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Connections
Fire
Keywords
Creep
Deflection
Dowels
Fiber Reinforced Polymer
Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer
Model
Densified Veneer Wood
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Recent studies showed the need for timber connections with high fire performance. Connections of members in timber structures commonly comprise steel connectors, such as dowels, screws, nails and toothed plates. However, multiple studies have shown that the presence of exposed metal in timber connections leads to a poor performance under fire conditions. Replacing metallic fasteners with non-metallic fasteners potentially enhances the fire performance of timber connections. Previous studies showed that Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) dowels can be a viable replacement for steel dowels and that Densified Veneer Wood functions well as a flitch plate material. However, as the resin matrix of GFRP dowels is viscoelastic, connection creep, which is not studied before, can be of concern. Also no research has been carried out on the fire performance of these connections. Therefore, a study of the creep behaviour and the fire performance of non-metallic timber connections comprising GFRP dowels and a Densified Veneer Wood flitch plate was performed, as is discussed in this thesis. Predictive models were proposed to determine the connection slip and load bearing capacity at ambient and elevated temperatures and in a fire. The material properties and heat transfer properties required for these models were determined experimentally and predictions of these models were experimentally validated. Furthermore, an adjustment of the predictive model of connection slip at ambient temperature allowed approximating the creep of the connection. The material properties, required for the creep model, were determined experimentally and predictions of the model were compared to results of longterm connection tests. The study confirmed that timber members jointed with non-metallic connectors have a significantly improved fire performance to timber joints using metallic connections. Models developed and proposed to predict fire performance gave accurate predictions of time to failure. It was concluded that non-metallic connections showed more creep per load per connector, than metallic connections. However, the ratio between initial deflection and creep (relative creep) and the ratio between load level and creep were shown to be similar for metallic and non-metallic connections.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Long-Term Behavior of Steel-CLT Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2080
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Connections
Serviceability
Mechanical Properties
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors

24 records – page 1 of 3.