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Development of a Cost-Effective CLT Panel Capable of Resisting DOS/DOD Design Basis Threats

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2582
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Ceilings
Floors
Walls
Organization
Karagozian & Case
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Ceilings
Floors
Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Ballistic Resistance
Blast Loads
Cost Effective
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Mark Weaver at Karagozian & Case
Summary
Buildings for the U.S. Department of State (DOS) and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) often have to meet blast as well as forced entry / ballistic resistance (FE/BR) design requirements to mitigate the hazardous effects associated with terrorism. Historically, DOS and DOD buildings exposed to these threats have been constructed using concrete and steel. However, the emergence of cross-laminated timber (CLT) presents an opportunity to provide a sustainable building material alternative to owners and architects developing such structures. Several wood characteristics (i.e., propensity to rupture in a brittle fashion upon being overstressed, relatively low penetration resistance) serve to limit CLT’s effectiveness in resisting blast and FE/BR threats. The proposed effort seeks to address these limitations by investigating the possibility of incorporating commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) building materials into CLT panel designs in order to meet DOS/DOD blast and FE/BR design requirements. Particular emphasis will be placed on ensuring the developed panel designs are cost competitive to facilitate their inclusion in actual buildings. The project team includes an American CLT manufacturer to quickly assess the cost impacts of incorporating COTS materials into CLT panel layups. Additionally, representatives from the DOS, DOD, and an architecture firm routinely involved with the design of DOS buildings will be consulted to ensure programmatic, aesthetic, and detailing issues are considered during candidate panel design development. 
Less detail

Development of Large Span CLT Floor/Roof System with Two-Way Plate Bending Action: Phase II

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2247
Topic
General Information
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Organization
University of British Columbia
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Topic
General Information
Keywords
Mass Timber
Cost Effective
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Frank Lam at the University of British Columbia
Summary
A continuous CLT floor/roof system that has two way bending action across multiple CLT panels will create open floor space with long spans in both major and minor directions, making mass timber construction more competitive and cost-effective. A design guide on CLT two way floor/roof system, incorporating the results from the two phases of study, will be developed at the end.
Less detail

Mass Timber Economics of 7-12 Storey Residential Rental Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2813
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Morrison Hershield
BC Housing
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Keywords
Cost Effective
Cost-Competitive
ROI
Building Code
Affordable Housing
Mass Timber
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Eric Wood at Morrison Hershfield
Summary
The study assesses the potential of mass timber multi-unit residential construction as it compares to traditional methods including concrete and steel in terms of cost competitiveness, cost effectiveness, financial value and ROI. The analysis will include potential limitations of existing building codes, how the codes support or constrain the use of mass timber, including impacts to affordability, and whether further industry and government support of tall wood construction is needed to integrate it into Canada’s housing supply. To inform the analysis, the study produces base case archetypes for concrete and steel structures, and then create a series of comparative archetypes mass timber structures and hybrid structures in the range of 7-12 storeys.
Less detail