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Encapsulated Mass Timber Construction - Cost Comparison Canada: Construction, Time & Maintenance Cost-Benefit Report

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2359
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Floors
Organization
Hanscomb
Publisher
National Research Council Canada
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Floors
Topic
Cost
Keywords
Encapsulated Mass Timber Construction
Building Code
Time
Construction Time
Construction Cost
Maintenance Cost
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The Task Group on Combustible Construction is in the process of evaluating a proposed code change request related to buildings of encapsulated mass timber construction (EMTC). As part of the analysis of the code change request, an impact analysis is required that includes a cost-benefit analysis. Hanscomb was hired to provide a cost-benefit analysis and to compare the estimated value of the following: 1. The cost of constructing a building of mass timber (unprotected) versus a building constructed of encapsulated mass timber (e.g. mass timber protected with a double layer of Type X gypsum board) versus a traditional concrete and steel building. 2. The time to build a building of mass timber construction (unprotected) versus a building of encapsulated mass timber construction versus a traditional concrete and steel building. 3. The annual maintenance costs of building of mass timber construction versus a building of encapsulated mass timber construction versus a traditional concrete and steel building. For the purposes of this study two sets of conceptual floor plans and elevations have been created: 1. A 12 storey building with a Group C major occupancy (residential) where each storey is 6,000 m2 in floor area. 2. A 12 storey building with a Group D major occupancy (office) where each storey is 7,200 m2 in floor area.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Life Cycle Assessment of a Post-Tensioned Timber Frame in Comparison to a Reinforced Concrete Frame for Tall Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue412
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Author
Cattarinussi, Laurent
Hofstetter, Kathrin
Ryffel, Rinaldo
Zumstein, K.
Ioannidou, Dimitra
Klippel, Michael
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Concrete
Sustainability
Life-Cycle Assessment
Post-Tensioned
Greenhouse Gases
Costs
Construction Time
Language
English
Conference
SBE Regional Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
June 15-17, 2016, Zurich, Switzerland
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Tall Wood Building Enclosures – A Race To the Top

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2346
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Site Construction Management
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Author
Hubbs, Brian
Finch, Graham
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Topic
Design and Systems
Site Construction Management
Keywords
Prefabrication
Building Enclosure
Façade
Curtain Wall
Durability
Construction Time
Language
English
Conference
Canadian Conference on Building Science and Technology
Research Status
Complete
Summary
On tall wood buildings, mass timber elements including CLT, NLT, glulam, and other engineered components absolutely need to be protected from excessive wetting during construction. This requirement precludes the use of many conventional cladding systems unless the building is fully hoarded during construction. The building enclosure and façade of UBC Tallwood House consists of an innovative prefabricated steel stud rainscreen curtain-wall assembly that is pre-insulated, pre-clad, and has factory installed windows. Design of connections and air and water sealing of panel joints and interfaces was carefully considered given the tall wood structure they were designed to protect. While steel studs were utilized in the panelized structure, feasible curtain-wall designs were also developed and prototyped for wood-framing, CLT, and precast concrete as part of the project. Looking ahead, there will continue to be innovation in design and construction of fast and durable facades for taller wood buildings. New prefabricated panel designs incorporating CLT panels and connection technologies from unitized curtainwall systems are already being developed for the “next tallest” wood buildings in North America.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail