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Characteristics of the Radio-Frequency/Vacuum Drying of Heavy Timbers for Post and Beam of Korean Style Housings Part II: For Korean Red Pine Heavy Timbers with 250 × 250 mm, 300 × 300 mm in Cross Section and 300 mm in Diameter, and 3,600 mm in Length

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1508
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Moisture
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Lee, Nam-Ho
Zhao, Xue-Feng
Shin, Ik-Hyun
Park, Moon-Jae
Park, Jung-Hwan
Park, Joo-Saeng
Publisher
The Korean Society of Wood Science Technology
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Journal Article
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Radio-Frequency/Vacuum Drying
Moisture Gradient
Shrinkage
Case Hardening
Surface Checks
Compressive Load
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of the Korean Wood Science and Technology
Summary
This study examined the characteristics of radio-frequency/vacuum dried Korean red pine (Pinus densoflora heavy timbers with 250 × 250 mm (S), 300 × 300 mm (L) in cross section and 300 mm in diameter, and 3,600 mm in length, which were subjected to compressive loading after a kerf pretreatment. The following results were obtained : The drying time was short and the drying rate was high in spite of the large cross section of specimens. The moisture gradient inall specimens was gentle in both longitudinal and transverse directions owing to dielectric heating. The shrinkage of the width in the direction perpendicular to was 21 percent ~ 76 percent of that of the thickness of square timbers in the direction parallel to the mechanical pressure. The casehardening for all specimens was very slight because of significantly reduced ratio of the tangential to radial shrinkage of specimens and kerfing. The surface checks somewhat severely occurred although the occurrence extent of the surface checks on the kerfed specimens was slight compared withthat on the control specimen.
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Residual Compressive Load-Carrying Capacity of Cross-Laminated Timber Walls After Exposed to One-Side Fire

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2689
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Bai, Yu
Zhang, Jin
Shen, Hao
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Residual Compressive Load-carrying Capacity
Fire Test
One-side Fire
Axial Compression Tests
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Building Engineering
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels are broadly utilized as structural members in modern timber structures. Variation in the residual resistance of CLT walls after fire exposure may lead to disruption of vertical force transmission and, in turn, structural collapse. To investigate the residual compressive load-carrying capacity of CLT walls after exposed to one-side fire, a series of tests were conducted on 3-ply and 5-ply members: axial compression tests, fire tests, and residual compressive load-carrying capacity tests. Combining the initial geometric defects obtained from the test results and the effect of shear deformation, theoretical formulae describing the compressive load-carrying capacity were deduced. Further considering the different mechanical properties over the residual cross-section model after fire, and the relative position between Region A and CLT orthogonal configuration, the calculation method of the residual compressive load-carrying capacity after fire were derived. The results of the residual compressive load-carrying capacity tests showed that the failure mode of the CLT walls after one-side fire was the eccentric compression, and the nonlinear segments of the load-axial and load-lateral displacement curves after fire accounted for larger proportion than those of axial compression tests. For the same total section thickness, the reduction in residual capacity of the 5-ply walls after fire was less than that of the 3-ply walls. The calculation results of the eccentric compression formulae considering shear deformation and initial geometric defect showed good agreement with the test values of axial compression tests. The residual compressive load-carrying capacity after one-side fire was predicted appropriately, which could be used as reference for assessing the residual load-carrying behavior of CLT elements after fire.
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Structural Response of Cross-Laminated Timber Compression Elements Exposed to Fire

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1338
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Wiesner, Felix
Randmael, Fredrik
Wan, Wing
Bisby, Luke
Hadden, Rory
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Reduced Cross-Section Method
Axial Load
Compressive Load
Deformation
Temperature
Zero-Strength Layer
Research Status
Complete
Series
Fire Safety Journal
Summary
A set of novel structural fire tests on axially loaded cross-laminated timber (CLT) compression elements (walls), locally exposed to thermal radiation sufficient to cause sustained flaming combustion, are presented and discussed. Test specimens were subjected to a sustained compressive load, equivalent to 10 % or 20 % of their nominal ambient axial compressive capacity. The walls were then locally exposed to a nominal constant incident heat flux of 50 kW/m2 over their mid height area until failure occurred. The axial and lateral deformations of the walls were measured and compared against predictions calculated using a finite Bernoulli beam element analysis, to shed light on the fundamental mechanics and needs for rational structural design of CLT compression elements in fire. For the walls tested herein, failure at both ambient and elevated temperature was due to global buckling. At high temperature failure results from excessive lateral deflections and second order flexural effects due to reductions the walls’ effective crosssection and flexural rigidity, as well as a shift of the effective neutral axis in bending during fire. Measured average one-dimensional charring rates ranged between 0.82 and 1.0 mm/min in these tests. As expected, the lamellae configuration greatly influenced the walls’ deformation responses and times to failure; with 3- ply walls failing earlier than those with 5-plies. The walls’ deformation response during heating suggests that, if a conventional reduced cross section method (RCSM), zero strength layer analysis were undertaken, the required zero strength layer depths would range between 15.2 mm and 21.8 mm. Deflection paths further suggest that the concept of a zero strength layer is inadequate for properly capturing the mechanical response of fire-exposed CLT compression elements.
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