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Behaviour of Parallel Bamboo Strand Lumber Under Compression Loading — An Experimental Study

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2514
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems

Compressive Behavior of Glulam Columns with Initial Cracks Under Eccentric Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1463
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Author
Zhang, Jing
He, Minjuan
Li, Zheng
Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Cracks
Compression Loads
Failure Modes
Load Bearing Capacity
Numerical Model
Research Status
Complete
Series
International Journal of Advanced Structural Engineering
Summary
This paper investigates the mechanical performance of longitudinally cracked glulam columns under eccentric compression loads. Experimental investigation was conducted to explore the influence of initial cracks on the failure modes and load bearing capacity of glulam columns. Two different crack patterns named DC and IC, and two column lengths (i.e. 600 and 1100 mm) were considered in the experiments. It was indicated that these two crack patterns reduced the capacity of slender glulam columns and the difference of failure modes was observed between glulam columns with and without initial cracks. Further, a numerical model was developed and validated by the test results. With the application of cohesive zone material model, the propagation of initial cracks could be considered in the numerical modeling. A parametric study was carried out by the verified model and the influence of crack lengths and crack locations was further investigated. From the numerical analysis, it was found that through cracks reduced the capacity of glulam columns significantly. Also, crack location impacts the capacity of glulam columns and the extent of impact relates to the slenderness ratio of the columns, while cracks with different lengths have similar influence on the capacity of columns.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Production and In-Plane Compression Mechanics of Alternatively Angled Layered Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1843
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Buck, Dietrich
Hagman, Olle
Publisher
North Carolina State University
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Manufacturing
Diagonal-Laminated Lumber
Panel Configuration
Compression Loads
Mass Timber
Research Status
Complete
Series
BioResources
Summary
Increasing awareness of sustainable building materials has led to interest in enhancing the structural performance of engineered wood products. This paper reports mechanical properties of cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels constructed with layers angled in an alternative configuration on a modified industrial CLT production line. Timber lamellae were adhesively bonded together in a single-step press procedure to form CLT panels. Transverse layers were laid at an angle of 45°, instead of the conventional 90° angle with respect to the longitudinal layers’ 0° angle. Tests were carried out on 20 five-layered CLT panels divided into two matched groups with either a 45° or a 90° configuration; an in-plane uniaxial compressive loading was applied in the principal orientation of the panels. These tests showed that the 45°-configured panels had a 30% higher compression stiffness and a 15% higher compression strength than the 90° configuration. The results also revealed that the 45°-configured CLT can be industrially produced without using more material than is required for conventional CLT 90° panels. In addition, the design possibility that the 45°-configured CLT can carry a given load while using less material also suggests that it is possible to use CLT in a wider range of structural applications.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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