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Advanced Wood-Based Solutions for Mid-Rise and High-Rise Construction: Exit Fire Separations in Mid-Rise Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1879
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shafts and Chases
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shafts and Chases
Topic
Fire
Keywords
National Building Code of Canada
Combustible Material
Mid-Rise
Noncombustible Construction
Research Status
Complete
Summary
FPInnovations initiated this project to demonstrate the ability of wood exit stairs in mid-rise buildings to perform adequately in a fire when NBCC requirements are followed, with the intent of changing perceptions of the fire safety of wood construction. The objective of this research is to investigate further the fire safety afforded by exit stair shafts of combustible construction, with the ultimate objective of better consistency between the provincial and national building codes with respect to fire requirements for exit stair shafts in mid-rise wood-frame construction.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Effects of Exposed Cross Laminated Timber on Compartment Fire Dynamics

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1340
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Rooms
Author
Hadden, Rory
Bartlett, Alastair
Hidalgo, Juan
Santamaria, Simón
Wiesner, Felix
Bisby, Luke
Deeny, Susan
Lane, Barbara
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Rooms
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Compartment Fires
Heat Release Rate
Temperature
Exposed Timber
Auto-Extinction
Combustible Material
Heat Transfer
Research Status
Complete
Series
Fire Safety Journal
Summary
A series of compartment fire experiments has been undertaken to evaluate the impact of combustible cross laminated timber linings on the compartment fire behaviour. Compartment heat release rates and temperatures are reported for three configuration of exposed timber surfaces. Auto-extinction of the compartment was observed in one case but this was not observed when the experiment was repeated under identical condition. This highlights the strong interaction between the exposed combustible material and the resulting fire dynamics. For large areas of exposed timber linings heat transfer within the compartment dominates and prevents auto-extinction. A framework is presented based on the relative durations of the thermal penetration time of a timber layer and compartment fire duration to account for the observed differences in fire dynamics. This analysis shows that fall-off of the charred timber layers is a key contributor to whether auto-extinction can be achieved.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Taller Wood Buildings and Fire Safety: Existing Evidence about Large Wood Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2095
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Fire
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Maxim, Paul
Plecas, Darryl
Garis, Len
Clare, Joseph
Organization
University of the Fraser Valley
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Report
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Tall Wood
Fire Safety
Combustible Material
Sprinklers
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Recently, Vancouver architect, Michael Green, issued a report entitled Tall Wood, arguing that skyscrapers and other tall buildings should use more wood as a primary construction material. His argument is that wood is up to the task, is less polluting, and is more environmentally sustainable than the materials currently used. Green’s (2012) buildings would employ “massive timber” elements such as cross laminated timber, laminated strand lumber, and laminated veneer lumber. Green is not suggesting that these tall building be of wood only. Rather, he is arguing that mass timber be integrated with other commonly-used structural materials such as concrete and steel. While wood and wood-mix skyscrapers capture the imagination, extending the height of buildings with the more typical lighter-frame construction is perhaps a more practical concern. Currently, light frame construction tends to be limited to buildings of four storeys and less in North America. In some jurisdictions, this limit is mandated by building codes: in others, it is simply practice. Yet, the ability to construct acceptably safe timber structures with appropriate sprinkler and other technologies led Switzerland to change its fire codes in 2005 and allow the use of structural timber in medium-rise residential buildings of up to six storeys (Frangi and Fontana, 2010). Depending upon the application, mid-sized wood frame buildings can be a less expensive and more flexible alternative to other structures. Despite the prevalence of wood frame structures throughout North America and parts of Europe, major concerns remain over the fire safety of such structures. This paper discusses some of the issues relating to wood structures and flammability.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail