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8 records – page 1 of 1.

Can Mass-Timber Construction Materials Provide Effective Thermal Capacitance in New Homes?

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue241
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Energy Performance
Environmental Impact
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dewsbury, Mark
Geard, Detlev
Fay, Roger
Organization
International Building Performance Simulation Association
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
China
Format
Conference Paper
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Energy Performance
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Australia
Building Code
Building Code of Australia
Carbon
Climate Change
Codes
Embodied Energy
Mass Timber
Thermal
Language
English
Conference
ASim 2012
Research Status
Complete
Notes
November 25-27, 2012, Shanghai, China
Summary
There has been no research to date exploring whether timber products can provide effective thermal capacitance in residential or commercial construction. This research is exploring the use of unique mass-timber products to provide a new form of thermal performance capacitance within the built fabric of new and existing homes. The development of mass timber products is a new paradigm in material and building science research in Australia, requiring the accounting for carbon emissions, carbon sequestration, material embodied energy and material thermal properties for this renewable resource. This paper focuses on the results from preliminary building simulation studies encompassing house energy rating simulations and a comparative analysis of embodied energy and carbon storage for a series of house plans in Australia.
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Climate Effects of Forestry and Substitution of Concrete Buildings and Fossil Energy

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2774
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Gustavsson, L.
Nguyen, T.
Sathre, Roger
Tettey, U.Y.A.
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Climate Change
Modular Construction
Carbon Emissions
Forest Management
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews
Summary
Forests can help mitigate climate change in different ways, such as by storing carbon in forest ecosystems, and by producing a renewable supply of material and energy products. We analyse the climate implications of different scenarios for forestry, bioenergy and wood construction. We consider three main forestry scenarios for Kronoberg County in Sweden, over a 201-year period. The Business-as-usual scenario mirrors today's forestry while in the Production scenario the forest productivity is increased by 40% through more intensive forestry. In the Set-aside scenario 50% of forest land is set-aside for conservation. The Production scenario results in less net carbon dioxide emissions and cumulative radiative forcing compared to the other scenarios, after an initial period of 30–35 years during which the Set-aside scenario has less emissions. In the end of the analysed period, the Production scenario yields strong emission reductions, about ten times greater than the initial reduction in the Set-aside scenario. Also, the Set-aside scenario has higher emissions than Business-as-usual after about 80 years. Increasing the harvest level of slash and stumps results in climate benefits, due to replacement of more fossil fuel. Greatest emission reduction is achieved when biomass replaces coal, and when modular timber buildings are used. In the long run, active forestry with high harvest and efficient utilisation of biomass for replacement of carbon-intensive non-wood products and fuels provides significant climate mitigation, in contrast to setting aside forest land to store more carbon in the forest and reduce the harvest of biomass.
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Comparison of Carbon Footprints: Mass Timber Buildings vs Steels – A Literature Review

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2380
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Cooney, Emily
Publisher
Lakehead University
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Sustainability
Carbon Footprint
Mass Timber
Steel
Greenhouse Gases
Climate Change
Engineered Wood Product (EWP)
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Sustainability and innovation are key components in the fight against climate change. Mass timber buildings have been gaining popularity due to the renewable nature of timber. Although research comparing mass timber buildings to more mainstream buildings such as steel is still in the early stages and therefore, limited. We are looking to determine the difference between carbon footprints of mass timber and traditional steel and concrete buildings. This is done with the intention of determining the sustainability and practicality of mass timber buildings.
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Free
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Cross-Laminated Timber Constructions in a Sustainable Future – Transition to Fossil Free and Carbon Capture Technologies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2696
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Tellnes, Lars
Saxegård, Simon
Johnsen, Fredrik Moltu
Publisher
IOP Publishing Ltd
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Environmental Product Declaration
Carbon Capture and Storage
Climate Change
Life Cycle
Carbon Footprint
End of Life
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science
Summary
Cross laminated timber (CLT) has recently increased in use as a building material for low carbon design and is often applied in small and multi-story buildings. Several studies have shown lower fossil related greenhouse gas emission than alternatives, but the life cycle emissions vary substantially between different CLT producers. These emissions are mainly indirect and thus climate change mitigation could reduce these emissions. Previous research shows that that biofuels and carbon capture and storage (CCS) are technologies that have the potential to reduce the climate impacts of the CLT life cycle. This study assesses the impacts on climate change from CLT with these technologies within the framework of environmental product declarations (EPD). In the short run, switching to fossil free fuels provides a reduction in the carbon footprint of CLT. In the long run, CCS at the end-of-life of CLT buildings can provide a net negative carbon footprint over the life cycle. This assessment on the use of CLT is mainly related to the Sustainable Development Goal SDG9 Industries, innovation and infrastructure and the indicator for CO2 emissions per value added, so the assessment in this paper is mainly focused on this goal. SDG7 on affordable and clean energy and SDG15 Life on land are also relevant.
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Free
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The Economic and Emissions Benefits of Engineered Wood Products in a Low-Carbon Future

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2351
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems

Effects of Climate Change on the Moisture Performance of Tallwood Building Envelope

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2771
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Walls
Author
Defo, Maurice
Lacasse, Michael
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Walls
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Climate Change
Hygrothermal Simulations
Moisture Performance
Durability
Mold Growth Risk
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
Summary
The objective of this study was to assess the potential effects of climate change on the moisture performance and durability of massive timber walls on the basis of results derived from hygrothermal simulations. One-dimensional simulations were run using DELPHIN 5.9.4 for 31 consecutive years of the 15 realizations of the modeled historical (1986–2016) and future (2062–2092) climates of five cities located across Canada. For all cities, water penetration in the wall assembly was assumed to be 1% wind-driven rain, and the air changes per hour in the drainage cavity was assumed to be 10. The mold growth index on the outer layer of the cross-laminated timber panel was used to compare the moisture performance for the historical and future periods. The simulation results showed that the risk of mold growth would increase in all the cities considered. However, the relative change varied from city to city. In the cities of Ottawa, Calgary and Winnipeg, the relative change in the mold growth index was higher than in the cities of Vancouver and St. John’s. For Vancouver and St. John’s, and under the assumptions used for these simulations, the risk was already higher under the historical period. This means that the mass timber walls in these two cities could not withstand a water penetration rate of 1% wind-driven rain, as used in the simulations, with a drainage cavity of 19 mm and an air changes per hour value of 10. Additional wall designs will be explored in respect to the moisture performance, and the results of these studies will be reported in a future publication. View Full-Text
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High-Rise Timber Buildings As a Climate Change Mitigation Measure – A Comparative LCA of Structural System Alternatives

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1184
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Wood Building Systems
Author
Skullestad, Julie
Bohne, Rolf
Lohne, Jardar
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Life-Cycle Assessment
Climate Change
Greenhouse Gases
Reinforced Concrete
Multi-Storey
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Energy Procedia
Summary
This paper reports on a study examining the potential of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the building sector by substituting multi-storey steel and concrete building structures with timber structures. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is applied to compare the climate change impact (CC) of a reinforced concrete (RC) benchmark structure to the CC of an alternative timber structure for four buildings ranging from 3 to 21 storeys. The timber structures are dimensioned to meet the same load criteria as the benchmark structures. The LCA comprises three calculation approaches differing in analysis perspective, allocation methods, and modelling of biogenic CO2 and carbonation of concrete. Irrespective of the assumptions made, the timber structures cause lower CC than the RC structures. By applying attributional LCA, the timber structures are found to cause a CC that is 34-84% lower than the RC structures. The large span is due to different building heights and methodological assumptions. The CC saving per m2 floor area obtained by substituting a RC structure with a timber structure decrease slightly with building height up to 12 storeys, but increase from 12 to 21 storeys. From a consequential LCA perspective, constructing timber structures can result in avoided GHG emissions, indicated by a negative CC. Compared to the RC structures, this equal savings greater than 100%.
Online Access
Free
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Ontario’s Climate Resilient Tall Wood Buildings and Structures: An Evaluation of the Impacts of Climate Change on Mass Timber/Tall Wood

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2289
Topic
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
National Research Council Canada, Canadian Construction Materials Centre
Country of Publication
Canada
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Keywords
Climate Change
Extreme Weather
Mass Timber
Tall Wood
Deterioration
Durability
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Philip Rizcallah.
Summary
The research conducted will provide new climatic data which takes into account certain extreme weather events being attributed to climate change to minimize and/or prevent the risk of failure of tall wood buildings and mass timber structures. The project will offer guidance on the design for durability of tall wood building enclosures and fill existing gaps in knowledge about the extent of the effects of the future climate conditions and extreme weather events (e.g. heat waves, rainfalls, wind storms, etc.) on the resistances to deterioration of building materials, air leakage, vapour diffusion, and water ingress.
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8 records – page 1 of 1.