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62 records – page 1 of 7.

Advanced Methods of Encapsulation

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue41
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Roy-Poirier, Audrey
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Codes
Encapsulation
Type X Gypsum Board
National Building Code of Canada
Tall Wood
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project aims to support the construction of tall wood buildings by identifying encapsulation methods that provide adequate protection of mass timber elements; the intention is that these methods could potentially be applied to mass timber elements so that the overall assembly could achive a 2 h fire resistance rating.
Online Access
Free
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Advanced Topics in Seismic Analysis and Design of Mid-Rise Wood-Frame Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1773
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Ni, Chun
Popovski, Marjan
Wang, Jasmine
Karacabeyli, Erol
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Dynamic Analysis
Deflection
Diaphragm
National Building Code of Canada
Capacity-Based Design
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5343-5351
Summary
The following topics in the field of seismic analysis and design of mid-rise (5- and 6-storey) wood-frame buildings are included in this paper: Determination of the building period, linear dynamic analysis of wood-frame structures, deflections of stacked multi-storey shearwalls, diaphragm classification, capacity-based design for woodframe...
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Advanced Wood-Based Solutions for Mid-Rise and High-Rise Construction: Exit Fire Separations in Mid-Rise Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1879
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shafts and Chases
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shafts and Chases
Topic
Fire
Keywords
National Building Code of Canada
Combustible Material
Mid-Rise
Noncombustible Construction
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
FPInnovations initiated this project to demonstrate the ability of wood exit stairs in mid-rise buildings to perform adequately in a fire when NBCC requirements are followed, with the intent of changing perceptions of the fire safety of wood construction. The objective of this research is to investigate further the fire safety afforded by exit stair shafts of combustible construction, with the ultimate objective of better consistency between the provincial and national building codes with respect to fire requirements for exit stair shafts in mid-rise wood-frame construction.
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Free
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Assessing the Fire Integrity Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber Floor Panel-To-Panel Joints

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue185
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Dagenais, Christian
Organization
Carleton University
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Connections
Fire
Keywords
Finite Element Model
Thickness
Codes
Panel-to-Panel
Joints
Canada
US
Fire Resistance
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
During the past few years, a relatively new technology has emerged in North America and changed the way professionals design and build wood structures: Cross-laminated Timber (CLT). CLT panels are manufactured in width ranging from 600 mm to 3 m. As such, fastening them together along their major strength axis is required in order to form a singular structural assembly resisting to in-plane and out-of-plane loading. Typical panel-to-panel joint details of CLT assemblies may consist of internal spline(s), single or double surface splines or half-lapped joints. These tightly fitted joint profiles should provide sufficient fire-resistance, but have yet to be properly evaluated for fire-resistance in CLT assemblies. The experimental portion of the study consisted at conducting ten (10) intermediate-scale fire-resistance tests of CLT floor assemblies with four (4) types of panel-to-panel joints and three (3) CLT thicknesses. The data generated from the intermediate-scale fire tests were used to validate a finite element heat transfer model, a coupled thermal-structural model and a simplified design model. The latter is an easy-to-use design procedure for evaluating the fire integrity resistance of the four commonly-used CLT floor assemblies and could potentially be implemented into building codes and design standards. Based on the test data and models developed in this study, joint coefficient values were derived for the four (4) types of CLT panel-to-panel joint details. Joint coefficients are required when assessing the fire integrity of joints using simple design models, such as the one presented herein and inspired from Eurocode 5: Part 1-2. The contribution of this study is to increase the knowledge of CLT exposed to fire and to facilitate its use in Canada and US by complementing current fire-resistance design methodologies of CLT assemblies, namely with respect to the fire integrity criterion. Being used as floor and wall assemblies, designers should be capable to accurately verify both the load-bearing and separating functions of CLT assemblies in accordance with fire-related provisions of the building codes, which are now feasible based on the findings of this study.
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Free
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Assessing The Flammability of Mass Timber Components: A Review

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue87
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Mehaffey, Jim
Dagenais, Christian
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
National Building Code of Canada
Flame Spread
Model
Cone Calorimeter Testing
Buildings
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report begins with a discussion of the mechanisms of flame spread over combustible materials while describing the NBCC prescriptive solutions that establish the acceptable fire performance of interior finish materials. It is noted that while flame spread ratings do give an indication of the fire performance of products in building fires, the data generated are not useful as input to fire models that predict fire growth in buildings. The cone calorimeter test is then described in some detail. Basic data generated in the cone calorimeter on the time to ignition and heat release rates are shown to be fundamental properties of wood products which can be useful as input to fire models for predicting fire growth in buildings. The report concludes with the recommendation that it would be useful to run an extensive set of cone calorimeter tests on SCL, glue-laminated timber and CLT products. The fundamental data could be most useful for validating models for predicting flame spread ratings of massive timber products and useful as input to comprehensive computer fire models that predict the course of fire in buildings. It is also argued that the cone calorimeter would be a useful tool in assessing fire performance during product development and for quality control purposes.
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Free
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Building Envelope Summary: Hygrothermal Assessment of Systems for Mid-Rise Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue250
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Abdulghani, Khaled
Cornick, Steve
Di Lenardo, Bruno
Ganapathy, Gnanamurugan
Lacasse, Michael
Maref, Wahid
Moore, Travis
Mukhopadhyaya, Phalguni
Nicholls, Mike
Saber, Hamed
Swinton, Michael
van Reenen, David
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Moisture
Keywords
National Building Code of Canada
Mid-Rise
Building Envelopes
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The role of the building envelope research team in this project was to assess whether midrise wood-frame (LWF) and cross-laminated timber (CLT) building envelope solutions developed by the fire research team to meet the fire provisions of the National Building Code (NBC) 2010 Part 3 Fire Protection, would also meet the NBC Part 5 Environmental Separation requirements relating to the protection of the building envelope from excessive moisture and water accumulation. As well, these wood-based mid-rise envelope solutions were to be assessed for their ability to meet Part 3 Building Envelope of the National Energy Code for Buildings (NECB) 2011. Requirements relating to heat, air, moisture, and precipitation (HAMP) control by the building envelope are included in Part 5 Environmental Separation of the NBC 2010. Part 5 addresses all building types and occupancies referred to in Part 3, but unlike requirements for fire protection, this section of the code was written more recently and is generic, including requirements that are more objective-oriented rather than prescriptive requirements pegged to specific constructions systems. The investigated methodologies developed and adapted for this study took those code characteristics into account.
Online Access
Free
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Canadian Mass Timber Demonstration Projects Initiatives

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2147
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Market and Adoption
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Mohammad, Mohammad
Tourrilhes, Julie
Coxford, Richard
Williamson, Miranda
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
High-Rise
Non-Residential
Building Codes
Canada
Tall Wood
Language
English
Conference
Modular and Offsite Construction Summit
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Climatological Analysis for Hygrothermal Performance Evaluation: Mid-Rise Wood

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue755
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Moisture
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Cornick, Steve
Swinton, Michael
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Climate
Hygrothermal
Mid-Rise
Moisture Content
National Building Code of Canada
Water Penetration
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The objective of the task is to select, from the 679 locations in Table C-2 of the 2010 National Building Code of Canada (NBC 2010) [1], several representative locations for which long-term historical weather data exists. This information from these locations can subsequently be used to determine the exterior boundary conditions for input files for hygrothermal simulation programs and hygrothermal testing in the laboratory. This report discusses the selection of locations for the hygrothermal simulation task of the project on Mid-rise Wood Buildings and the determination of spray-rates and pressure differentials for the water penetration testing portion of the project.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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CLT Infill Panels in Steel Moment Resisting Frames as a Hybrid Seismic Force Resisting System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue107
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dickof, Carla
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
National Building Code of Canada
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Seismic Force Resisting System
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This paper examines CLT-steel hybrid systems at three, six, and nine storey heights to increase seismic force resistance compared to a plain wood system. CLT panels are used as infill in a steel moment frame combining the ductility of a steel moment frame system with a stiffness and light weight of CLT panels. This system allows for the combination of high strength and ductility of steel with high stiffness and light weight of timber. This thesis examines the seismic response of this type of hybrid seismic force resisting system (SFRS) in regions with moderate to high seismic hazard indices. A detailed non-linear model of a 2D infilled frame system and compared to the behavior of a similar plain steel frame at each height. Parametric analysis was performed determining the effect of the panels and the connection configuration, steel frame design, and panel configuration in a multi-bay system. Static pushover loading was applied alongside semi-static cyclic loading to allow a basis of comparison to future experimental tests. Dynamic analysis using ten ground motions linearly scaled to the uniform hazard spectra for Vancouver, Canada with a return period of 2% in 50 years as, 10% in 50 years, and 50% in 50 years to examine the effect of infill panels on the interstorey drift of the three, six, and nine storey. The ultimate and yield strength and drift capacity are determined and used to determine the overstrength and ductility factors as described in the National Building Code of Canada 2010.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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62 records – page 1 of 7.