Skip header and navigation

9 records – page 1 of 1.

Characterizing and Quantifying Environmental and Economic Benefits of Cross Laminated Timber Buildings across the U.S.

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2564
Topic
Cost
Energy Performance
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Organization
Colorado School of Mines
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Topic
Cost
Energy Performance
Keywords
Numerical Analysis
Whole Building Energy Model
Building Envelope
Monitoring
Commercial Buildings
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Paulo Tabares at the Colorado School of Mines
Summary
Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) is a mass timber material that has the potential to expand the wood building market in the U.S. However, new sustainable building technologies need extensive field and numerical validation quantifying environmental and economic benefits of using CLT as a sustainable building material so it can be broadly adopted in the building community. These benefits will also be projected nationwide across the United States once state-of-the-art software is validated and will include showcasing and documenting synergies between multiple technologies in the building envelope and heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. However, there are no such studies for CLT. The objective of this project is to quantify and showcase environmental and economic benefits of CLT as a sustainable building material in actual (and simulated) commercial buildings across the entire United States by doing: (1) on-site monitoring of at least four CLT buildings, (2) whole building energy model validation, (3) optimization of the performance and design for CLT buildings and (4) comparison with traditional building envelopes. This knowledge gap needs to be filled to position CLT on competitive grounds with steel and concrete and is the motivation for this study.
Less detail

Evaluating Hygrothermal Performance of Interlocking Cross-Laminated Timber Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue804
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Glass, Samuel
Smith, Ryan
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Climate
Building Envelope
Hygrothermal Performance
US
Interlocking CLT
Moisture
Research Status
In Progress
Summary
Unlike other solid wood panel systems, ICLT panels are manufactured without the use of adhesives or fasteners. Wood members are connected with tongue-andgroove joints within a given layer and with dovetail joints across layers. This reduces cost and allo...
Resource Link
Less detail

Evolution of the Building Envelope in Modern Wood Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1799
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Moisture
Site Construction Management
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Building Envelope
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Building Envelope
Topic
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Moisture
Site Construction Management
Keywords
Energy Efficiency
Building Envelope
Tall Wood
Wood Infill Walls
Podium Structures
Articulated Buildings
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report provides an overview of major changes occurred in the recent decade to design and construction of the building envelope of wood and wood-hybrid construction. It also covers some new or unique considerations required to improve building envelope performance, due to evolutions of structural systems, architectural design, energy efficiency requirements, or use of new materials. It primarily aims to help practicioners better understand wood-based building envelope systems to improve design and construction practices. The information provided should also be useful to the wood industry to better understand the demands for wood products in the market place. Gaps in research are identified and summarized at the end of this report.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Expanding the Cross-Laminated Timber Market through Building Moisture Monitoring and Improved Modeling

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue719
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Colorado School of Mines
Forest Products Laboratory
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Keywords
Moisture Content
Building Envelope
Climate
Hygrothermal Models
Long-term
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contacts are Shiling Pei (Colorado School of Mines) and Samuel L. Zelinka (Forest Products Laboratory)
Summary
This project will generate three benchmark data sets for multistory CLT building moisture performance in different climate zones. Data will include moisture contents at key wood components and high moisture risk locations throughout the buildings. A relatively simple, but fully validated, numerical model for analyzing similar building moisture performance will be recommended. These results will be useful for structural engineers and architects to accurately consider moisture in their design of mass timber buildings.
Resource Link
Less detail

Factors Affecting Distribution of Borate to Protect Building Envelope Components from Biodegradation

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1586
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Hygrothermal Characterization and Modeling of Cross-Laminated Timber in the Building Envelope

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2562
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Moisture
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Author
Kordziel, Steven
Glass, Samuel
Boardman, Charles
Munson, Robert
Zelinka, Samuel
Pei, Shiling
Tabares-Velasco, Paulo
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Topic
Moisture
Design and Systems
Keywords
Building Envelope
Hygrothermal Modeling
Moisture Performance
Water Uptake
Hygric Redistribution
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Building and Environment
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a type of mass timber panel used in floor, wall, and roof assemblies. An important consideration in design and construction of timber buildings is moisture durability. This study characterized the hygrothermal performance of CLT panels with laboratory measurements at multiple scales, field measurements, and modeling. The CLT panels consisted of five layers, four with spruce-pine-fir lumber and one with Douglas-fir lumber. Laboratory characterization involved measurements on small specimens that included material from only one or two layers and large specimens that included all five layers of the CLT panel. Water absorption was measured with panel specimens partially immersed in water, and a new method was developed where panels were exposed to ponded water on the top surface. This configuration gave a higher rate of water uptake than the partial immersion test. The rate of drying was much slower when the wetted surface was covered with an impermeable membrane. Measured hygrothermal properties were implemented in a one-dimensional transient hygrothermal model. Simulation of water uptake indicated that vapor diffusion had a significant contribution in parallel with liquid transport. A simple approximation for liquid transport coefficients, with identical coefficients for suction and redistribution, was adequate for simulating panel-scale wetting and drying. Finally, hygrothermal simulation of a CLT roof assembly that had been monitored in a companion field study showed agreement in most cases within the sensor uncertainty. Although the hygrothermal properties are particular to the wood species and CLT panels investigated here, the modeling approach is broadly applicable.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Instrumentation for Monitoring Performance in a Six-Storey Building in Vancouver Built for High Energy Performance

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1177
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Serviceability
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Passive House
Author
Wang, Jieying
Thomas, Tony
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Passive House
Topic
Serviceability
Keywords
Residential
Commercial
Long-term Performance
Moisture
Building Envelope
Indoor Environmental Quality
Vertical Differential Movement
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report documents the instrumentation installed for monitoring moisture, indoor air quality and differential movement performance in a six-storey building located in the City of Vancouver. The building has five storeys of wood-frame construction above a concrete podium, providing 85 rental units for residential and commercial use...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Mid-Rise Wood Constructions: Specifications of Mid-Rise Envelopes for Hygrothermal Assessment

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue754
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Wood Building Systems

Preliminary Assessment of Moisture-Related Properties for Structural Composite Lumber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1175
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Moisture
Serviceability
Material
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Moisture
Serviceability
Keywords
Water Absorption
Vapour Permeance
Vapour Sorption
Dimensional Stability
Building Envelope
Moisture Management
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Fifteen structural composite lumber (SCL) products including laminated-veneer lumber (LVL), laminated strand lumber (LSL), oriented strand lumber (OSL), and parallel strand lumber (PSL) provided by Boise Cascade, LP, West Fraser, and Weyerhaeuser were tested for moisture-related properties in this study, also covering four reference materials: 16-mm Oriented Strand Board (OSB), 19-mm Canadian Softwood Plywood (plywood), 38-mm Douglas-fir and lodgepole pine solid wood. Water absorption, vabour permeance, vapour sorption, and dimensional stability were measured with limited replication by following relevant standards for a purpose of assisting in improving building design and construction, such as hygrothermal modelling of building envelope assemblies, design for vertical differential movement, and on-site moisture management.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

9 records – page 1 of 1.