Skip header and navigation

6 records – page 1 of 1.

Carbon Impact and Cost of Mass Timber Beam–Column Gravity Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2883
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Environmental Impact
Application
Frames
Author
Chaggaris, Rachel
Pei, Shiling
Kingsley, Greg
Feitel, Alexis
Organization
Colorado School of Mines
Editor
Ganguly, Indroneil
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Application
Frames
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
IBC
Tall Wood Buildings
Gravity Framing System
Embodied Carbon
Mass Timber
Biogenic Carbon
Research Status
Complete
Series
Sustainability
Summary
The need to lower the embodied carbon impact of the built environment and sequester carbon over the life of buildings has spurred the growth of mass timber building construction, leading to the introduction of new building types (Types IV-A, B, and C) in the 2021 International Building Code (IBC). The achievement of sustainability goals has been hindered by the perceived first cost assessment of mass timber systems. Optimizing cost is an urgent prerequisite to embodied carbon reduction. Due to a high level of prefabrication and reduction in field labor, the mass timber material volume constitutes a larger portion of total project cost when compared to buildings with traditional materials. In this study, the dollar cost, carbon emitted, and carbon sequestered of mass timber beam–column gravity system solutions with different design configurations was studied. Design parameters studied in this sensitivity analysis included viable building types, column grid dimension, and building height. A scenario study was conducted to estimate the economic viability of tall wood buildings with respect to land costs. It is concluded that, while Type III building designations are the most economical for lower building heights, the newly introduced Type IV subcategories remain competitive for taller structures while providing a potentially significant embodied carbon benefit.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Comparative life cycle assessment of cross laminated timber building and concrete building with special focus on biogenic carbon

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2913
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Environmental Impact
Energy Performance
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Andersen, Julie
Rasmussen, Nana
Ryberg, Morten
Organization
Technical University of Denmark
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Energy Performance
Keywords
Life-Cycle Assessment
Biogenic Carbon
Forest Transformation
Research Status
Complete
Series
Energy and Buildings
Summary
This study conducted a consequential Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) on two similar mid-rise apartment buildings applying either concrete or cross laminated timber (CLT) as the main structural material. The study further investigated inclusion of biogenic carbon and how this affects environmental impacts related to Global warming. Thus, two assessment scenarios were applied: A Base scenario, without accounting for biogenic carbon and a Biogenic carbon scenario that include a GWPbio factor to account for the use of biogenic carbon. The CLT building had the lowest impact score in 11 of 18 impact categories including Global warming. Operational energy use was the main contributor to the total impact with some variation across impact scores, but closely followed by impacts embodied in materials (incl. End-of-Life). An evaluation of the potential forest transformations required for fulfilling future projections for new building construction in 2060 showed that about 3% of current global forest area would be needed. This share was essentially independent of the selected building material as the main driver for forest transformation was found to be energy use during building operation. Thus, focus should primarily be on reducing deforestation related to energy generation rather than deforestation from production of building materials.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

The Design of Mass Timber Panels as Heat-Exchangers (Dynamic Insulation)

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2971
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Energy Performance
Author
Craig, Salmaan
Halepaska, Anna
Ferguson, Katherine
Rains, Preston
Elbrecht, Jacob
Freear, Andrew
Kennedy, David
Moe, Kiel
Organization
McGill University
Auburn University
Editor
Schlueter, Arno
Publisher
Frontiers
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Topic
Energy Performance
Keywords
Biogenic Carbon
Carbon Utilization
Low Carbon Materials
Integrated Materials Design
Mass Timber Construction
Sustainable Construction
Thermally Activated Building System
Buoyancy Ventilation
Research Status
Complete
Series
Frontiers in Built Environment
Summary
Mass timber products, together with careful forestry management, could help decarbonize the construction industry. These products must be long-lasting, to safely store atmospheric carbon for decades or centuries, and multi-functional, to displace materials and equipment that are emissions-intensive. This paper shows how to optimize mass timber panels as heat-exchangers, suggesting how to eliminate insulation while simplifying HVAC systems. Test panels measured the heat-exchange in steady and transient conditions, when the ventilation was driven by a fan or by thermal buoyancy. The total heat transfer was predicted accurately by theory in all cases. Further investigation is needed to understand the possible heat-recovery effects at the exterior surface.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Environmental Impacts of Building Construction Using Cross-laminated Timber Panel Construction Method: A Case of the Research Building in Kyushu, Japan

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2412
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Life Cycle Assessment of Mass Ply Panels Produced in Oregon

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3014
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Author
Puettmann, Maureen
Sinha, Arijit
Organization
Woodlife Environmental Consultants
Oregon State University
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Report
Material
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Life Cycle Assessment
Energy Consumption
Biogenic Carbon
Life Cycle Inventory Analysis
Environmental Product Declarations
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Every material has an environmental footprint. Mass Plywood Panel, a new entrant in the mass timber category, has the potential to revolutionize the mass timber sector. The environmental consequences of producing Mass Ply Panels (MPP) are carried forward into the life cycle of products made from it, such as wooden structures. Life cycle inventory (LCI) data cover forest regeneration through to final product at the mill gate. There is over 20 years of life cycle assessment (LCA) research on major US produced forest products, both structural and nonstructural, from four major regions. This report describes the cradle-to-gate (mill) energy and materials required for producing MPP produced in Oregon and the subsequent releases into the environment. The environmental impacts, global warming, ozone depletion, acidification, smog, and eutrophication are discussed.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Temporally-differentiated biogenic carbon accounting of wood building product life cycles

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2987
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Environmental Impact
Author
Head, Marieke
Magnan, Michael
Kurz, Werner A.
Levasseur, Annie
Beauregard, Robert
Margni, Manuele
Organization
École Polytechnique de Montréal
Université Laval
Publisher
Springer
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Wood Products
Biogenic Carbon
Emission Timing
Temporary Carbon Storage
Life Cycle Inventory
End-of-Life
Research Status
Complete
Series
SN Applied Sciences
Summary
Although standards have identified temporary carbon storage as an important element to consider in wood product LCAs, there has been no consensus on a methodology for its accounting. This work aims to improve the accounting of carbon storage and fluxes in long-life wood products in LCA. Biogenic carbon from harvested roundwood logs were tracked using the Carbon Budget Model Framework for Harvested Wood Products (CBMF-HWP). Carbon flows through wood product manufacturing, building life and end-of-life phases, and carbon stocks and fluxes from harvest to the atmosphere were estimated. To cover the products commonly used in the Canadian building industry, a range of softwood products types, provinces and territories and building lifetimes were considered. In addition, policy scenarios were considered in order to model the effects of dynamic parameters through time as a policy target is reached. Most wood products have similar emissions profiles, though cross-laminated timber has higher sawmill emissions and oriented-strand board has higher initial post-demolition emissions. The region of construction is also predictive of the initial post-demolition emissions. Higher recycling rates shift materials from landfills into subsequent product systems, thus avoiding landfill emissions. Landfill decay rates are affected by climate and results in a large range of landfill emissions. The degree of postponement of end-of-life emissions is highly dependent upon the wood product type, region and building lifespan parameters. This work develops biogenic carbon profiles that allows for modelling dynamic cradle-to-grave LCAs of Canadian wood products.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.