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Bending and Bonding Properties of Mixed-Species Glued Laminated Timber from Merpauh, Jelutong and Sesendok

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2434
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Wood Building Systems

Effect of Notches on the Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2559
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Mississippi State University
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Notches
Notched Connections
Bending Properties
Flexural Properties
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contacts are Robert J. Ross at the Forest Products Laboratory and Rubin Shmulsky at Mississippi State University
Summary
Notches, particularly when incorporated on the tensile face, influence the ultimate capacity of members, such as beams and floor panels. Understanding and quantification of failure modes, ductility, and strength of notched CLT floor panels can allow the safe application of notches on building construction. Despite wood’s ductility, notches are known areas of stress concentration. The 2018 International Residential Code for one- and two-family dwellings (International Code Council 2017) restricts the use of notches on engineered wood products by requiring structural calculations instead of elucidating the ways notches might be used. To employ CLT to its maximum potential, there is a current and pressing need for better knowledge regarding the influence of notches on flexural performance. This research seeks to review the literature regarding notches in solid and engineered beams, review typical CLT design details that employ or utilized notched panels, and conduct pilot-scale testing of notched CLT panels.
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Mechanical Properties of Laminated Strand Lumber and Hybrid Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue419
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Author
Wang, Zhiqiang
Gong, Meng
Chui, Ying Hei
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Bending Properties
Failure Modes
Planar Shear Properties
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
Hybrid cross laminated timber (HCLT) was fabricated using lumber and/or laminated strand lumber (LSL), the mechanical performances of which were evaluated. To reach this goal, the mechanical properties of LSL and the bending properties of CLT and HCLT were measured in this study. The properties of LSL measured included the tension strength (only in the major direction), shear strength, shear modulus, and modulus of elasticity (MOE) and modulus of rupture (MOR). The failure mode of each kind of specimens was visually examined and recorded. Four types of CLT panels, one generic CLT (used as control) and three types HCLT were fabricated. The properties measured included the bending properties (in the major direction) and planar shear properties (in both major and minor directions). It was found that the HCLT had better bending and planar shear properties than that of generic CLT. The MOE and MOR of HCLT having LSL as the outer layers were 19% and 36% higher than those of generic one, respectively. The MOE and MOR of HCLT having LSL as core layer (replacing the cross lumber layer) were 13% and 24% higher than that of generic CLT, respectively. The failure modes of four types of CLT observed included the planar shear failure of cross lumber layer, tension failure of bottom LSL, and tension failure of bottom lumber, especially tension failure of lumber originated at a knot(s).
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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