Skip header and navigation

Refine Results By

121 records – page 2 of 13.

CLT Buildings Laterally Braced with Core and Perimeter Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1663
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Polastri, Andrea
Loss, Cristiano
Pozza, Luca
Smith, Ian
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Multi-Storey
Numerical Models
X-RAD
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 3706-3715
Summary
In this work the behaviour of hybrid multi-storey buildings braced with Cross-Laminated-Timber (CLT) cores and shear-walls is studied based on numerical analyses. Two procedures for calibrating numerical models are adopted and compared to test data and application of provisions in current design codes. The paper presents calibration of parameters characterising connections used to interconnect adjacent CLT panels and building cores, and attach shear-walls to foundations or floors that act as eleveted diaphragms. Different case studies are analysed comparing the structural responses of buildings assembled with „standard" fastening systems (e.g. hold-downs and angle-brackets), or using a special X-RAD connection system. The aim is to characterize behaviours of connections in ways that reflect how they perform as parts of completed multi-storey superstructure systems, rather than when isolated from such systems or their substructures. Results from various analyses are presented in terms of principal elastic periods, base shear forces, and uplift forces in buildings. Discussion addresses key issues associated with engineering analysis and design of buildings having around five or more storeys.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Combination of Steel Plate Shear Walls and Timber Moment Frames for Improved Seismic Performance

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2735
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Frames
Author
Iqbal, Asif
Todorov, Borislav
Billah, Muntasir
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Timber Moment Frames
Steel Plate Shear Walls
Hybrid
Seismic Performance
Interstory Drifts
Conference
World Conference on Earthquake Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Recent interests in adopting sustainable materials and developments in construction technology have created a trend of aiming for greater heights with timber buildings. With the increased height these buildings are subjected to higher level of lateral load demand. A common and efficient way to increase capacity is to use shearwalls, which can resist significant part of the load on the structures. Prefabricated mass timber panels such as those made of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) can be used to form the shearwalls. But due to relatively low stiffness value of timber it is often difficult to keep the maximum drifts within acceptable limit prescribed by building codes. It becomes necessary to either increase wall sizes to beyond available panel dimensions or use multiple or groups of walls spread over different locations over the floor plan. Both of the options are problematic from the economic and functional point of view. One possible alternative is to adopt a Hybrid system, using Steel Plate Shear Walls (SPSW) with timber moment frames. The SPSW has much higher stiffness and combined with timber frames it can reduce overall building drifts significantly. Frames with prefabricated timber members have considerable lateral load capacity. For structures located in seismic regions the system possesses excellent energy dissipation ability with combination of ductile SPSW and yielding elements within the frames. This paper investigates combination of SPSW with timber frames for seismic applications. Numerical model of the system has been developed to examine the interaction between the frames and shear walls under extreme lateral load conditions. Arrangements of different geometries of frames and shear walls are evaluated to determine their compatibility and efficiency in sharing lateral loads. Recommendations are presented for optimum solutions as well as practical limits of applications.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

A Comparative Analysis of Three Methods Used for Calculating Deflections for Multi-Storey Wood Shearwalls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1719
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
Newfield, Grant
Wang, Jasmine
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Deformation
Drifts
Stiffness
Building Period
Base Shear
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4597-4604
Summary
With the introduction of 5 and 6-storey wood structures into the National Building Code of Canada 2015, it is important that guidance be provided to engineers to ensure that a reasonable design approach can be sought in the design of taller wood structures. The purpose of this technical paper is to compare various methods for calculating building deformations for wood-platform framed structures, which range from simply assuming each storey acts independent of the adjacent storey to a purely mechanics-based approach considering all 6 storeys acting as a continuous wall in order to compare the differences in drifts, stiffness, building period, base shear, and force distribution based on relative stiffness. General guidance is provided on which method to use.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Comparison of the Seismic Performance of Different Hybrid Timber-Steel Frame Configurations

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1775
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Marin, Jose Alberto
He, Minjuan
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Finite Element Model
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Deformation
Lateral Loading
Abaqus
Displacement
Inter-Story Drift
Diaphragm
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5401-5408
Summary
This paper presents a finite element modeling case study of three different designs of hybrid timber-steel 6-story buildings. One of the buildings is composed by steel frames and timber diaphragms while the other two cases consist of the initial design with timber shear walls added in different dispositions, one with outer walls and the other...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Contemporary and Novel Hold-Down Solutions for Mass Timber Shear Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2941
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Tannert, Thomas
Loss, Cristiano
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
University of British Columbia
Editor
Tullini, Nerio
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Self-Tapping Screws
Internal-Perforated Steel Plates
Hyperelastic Bearing Pads
Proprietary Connections
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
Summary
‘Mass timber’ engineered wood products in general, and cross-laminated timber in particular, are gaining popularity in residential, non-residential, as well as mid- and high-rise structural applications. These applications include lateral force-resisting systems, such as shear walls. The prospect of building larger and taller timber buildings creates structural design challenges; one of them being that lateral forces from wind and earthquakes are larger and create higher demands on the ‘hold-downs’ in shear wall buildings. These demands are multiple: strength to resist loads, lateral stiffness to minimize deflections and damage, as well as deformation compatibility to accommodate the desired system rocking behaviour during an earthquake. In this paper, contemporary and novel hold-down solutions for mass timber shear walls are presented and discussed, including recent research on internal-perforated steel plates fastened with self-drilling dowels, hyperelastic rubber pads with steel rods, and high-strength hold-downs with self-tapping screws.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Cross-Laminated Timber Fasteners Solutions for Tall Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2197
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Shear Walls
Walls
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Shear Walls
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Wall-to-Floor
Wall-to-Wall
Wall-to-Foundation
Strength Properties
Screw Connectors
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Arijit Sinha at Oregon State University (United States)
Summary
Constructing buildings with CLT requires development of novel panel attachment methods and mechanisms. Architects and engineers need to know the engineering strength properties of connected panels, especially in an earthquake prone area. This project will improve knowledge of three types of wall panel connections: wall-to-floor, wall-to-wall, and wall-to-foundation. Testing will determine the strength properties of metal connectors applied with diffferent types and sizes of screw fasteners. The data will be used to develop a modeling tool that engineers can use when designing multi-story buildings to be constructed with CLT panels.
Less detail

Cross-Laminated Timber for Seismic Regions: Progress and Challenges for Research and Implementation

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue162
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Pei, Shiling
van de Lindt, John
Popovski, Marjan
Berman, Jeffrey
Dolan, Daniel
Ricles, James
Sause, Richard
Blomgren, Hans-Erik
Rammer, Douglas
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Lateral Loads
Prefabrication
US
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Structural Engineering
Summary
Compared to light-frame wood shear walls, it is relatively difficult for panelized CLT shear walls to achieve similar levels of lateral deflection without paying special attention to design details, i.e., connections. A design lacking ductility or energy dissipating mechanism will result in high acceleration amplifications and excessive global overturning demands for multistory buildings, and even more so for tall wood buildings. Although a number of studies have been conducted on CLT shear walls and building assemblies since the 1990s, the wood design community’s understanding of the seismic behavior of panelized CLT systems is still in the learning phase, hence the impetus for this article and the tall CLT building workshop, which will be introduced herein. For example, there has been a recent trend in engineering to improve resiliency, which seeks to design a building system such that it can be restored to normal functionality sooner after an earthquake than previously possible, i.e., it is a resilient system. While various resilient lateral system concepts have been explored for concrete and steel construction, this concept has not yet been realized for multistory CLT systems. This forum article presents a review of past research developments on CLT as a lateral force-resisting system, the current trend toward design and construction of tall buildings with CLT worldwide, and attempts to summarize the societal needs and challenges in developing resilient CLT construction in regions of high seismicity in the United States.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Cyclic Testing and Simulation of Hold Down Connections in Radiata Pine CLT Shear Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1605
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Benedetti, Franco
Rosales, Víctor
Opazo, Alexander
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Pine
Hold-Down
Hysteretic Model
Cyclic Loading
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 2041-2050
Summary
Structures built with cross laminated timber (CLT) are an attractive alternative to traditional construction materials in terms of environmental performance and habitability, but its structural behavior is not well understood for each timber specie. This work provides a comprehensive study of the structural behavior of radiata pine CLT shear walls, by means of laboratory testing and numerical analysis of hold down connections. The observed test response of connections is replicated by calibrating two hysteretic models on OpenSees, and its fidelity is revised through the analysis of a full scale wall test and simulation. Main outcomes suggest that advanced modelling tools can accurately reproduce the hysteretic behaviour of the connections of timber panels. In terms of connections behaviour, it is observed that hold downs on radiata pine CLT elements reach less load capacity than hold downs on other wood specie, and no significant difference with the parallel to grain capacity of angle brackets connections is noticed. Besides, it is found that radiata pine CLT walls can achieve suitable cyclic loading performance and reach high levels of displacement ductility. Furthermore, the importance of friction on the load capacity of the wall is showed.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Damage Assessment of Connections used in Cross-Laminated Timber Subject to Cyclic Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue225
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Schneider, Johannes
Karacabeyli, Erol
Popovski, Marjan
Stiemer, Siegfried
Tesfamariam, Solomon
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Fasteners
Damage Index (DI) Method
Brackets
Load Displacement
Hysteretic
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Performance of Constructed Facilities
Notes
https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)CF.1943-5509.0000528
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) products are gaining popularity in the North American market and are being used in midrise wood buildings, in particular, in shearwall applications. Shearwalls provide resistance to lateral loads such as wind and earthquake loads, and therefore it is important to gain a better understanding of the behavior of CLT shearwall systems during earthquake events. This paper is focused on the seismic performance of connections between CLT shearwall panels and the foundation. CLT panels are very stiff and energy dissipation is accomplished by the connections. A literature review on previous research work related to damage prediction and assessment for wood frame structures was performed. Furthermore, a test program was conducted to investigate the performance of CLT connections subjected to simulated earthquake loads. Two different brackets in combination with five types of fasteners were tested under monotonic and cyclic loading protocols. In total, 98 connection tests were conducted and the monotonic load-displacement curves and hysteretic loops were obtained. In this paper, an energy-based cumulative damage assessment model was calibrated with the CLT connection test data. Finally, a correlation between the damage index and physical damage is provided.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Damage Assessment of Cross Laminated Timber Connections Subjected to Simulated Earthquake Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue70
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Schneider, Johannes
Stiemer, Siegfried
Tesfamariam, Solomon
Karacabeyli, Erol
Popovski, Marjan
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Damage
Panels
North American Market
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
July 15-19, 2012, Auckland, New Zealand
Summary
Wood-frame is the most common construction type for residential buildings in North America. However, there is a limit to the height of the building using a traditional wood-frame structure. Cross-laminated timber (CLT) provides possible solutions to mid-rise and high-rise wood buildings. CLT offers many advantages such as improved dimensional stability, a quicker erection time and good performance in case of fire. In order to introduce the cross-laminated timber products to the North American market, it is important to gain a comprehensive understanding of its structural properties. This paper focuses on the seismic performance of CLT connections. Over the last few years FPInnovations of Canada has conducted a test program to determine the structural properties of CLT panels and its application in shear walls. The test program comprised of more than 100 connection tests which followed the loading procedures of CUREE and ISO test protocols as specified in ASTM Standards ASTM E 2126-09 (2009). These tests were performed parallel and perpendicular to the grain of the outer layer, respectively. The impact of different connections on the seismic performance of CLT walls was investigated in a second phase on full size shearwall. CLT panels are relatively stiff and thus energy dissipation must be accomplished through the ductile behaviour of connections between different shear wall elements and the connections to the story below. A literature review on previous research work related to damage prediction and assessment for wood frame structures was performed. Different approaches for damage indices were compared and discussed. This paper describes how the energy-based cumulative damage assessment model was calibrated to the CLT connection and shear wall test data in order to investigate the damage under monotonic and cyclic loading. Comparison of different wall setup provided a deeper insight into the damage estimation of CLT shear walls and determination of the key parameters in the damage formulation. This represents a first published attempt to apply the damage indices to estimate the seismic behaviour of CLT shear walls.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

121 records – page 2 of 13.