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12 records – page 1 of 2.

Technical Note: Effects of Nanoclay Addition to Phenol-Formaldehyde Resin on the Permeability of Oriented Strand Lumber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1465
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Connections
Material
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
Author
Zhang, Chao
Smith, Gregory
Publisher
Society of Wood Science and Technology
Year of Publication
2010
Format
Journal Article
Material
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Phenol Formaldehyde
Adhesives
Permeability
Nanoclays
Lodgepole Pine
Mountain Pine Beetle
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood and Fiber Science
Summary
This note examined the effects of adding nanoclays to phenol-formaldehyde resin during the manufacture of oriented strand lumber (OSL) on its in-plane permeability. The panels were made from mountain pine beetle (MPB) attacked lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) strands. Three different montmorillonite nanoclays were mixed with the PF resin: Na+, hydrophobic organics modified 10A, and hydrophilic organics modified 30B. None of the nanoclays changed the permeability of OSL significantly. The MPB-OSL had higher in-plane permeability than those conventionally made from aspen, which indicated that the pressing time could be shorter for MPB-OSL compared with OSL made from MPB-free strands.
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In-Plane Permeability of Oriented Strand Lumber, Part I: The Effects of Mat Density and Flow Direction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1466
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
General Information
Material
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
Author
Zhang, Chao
Smith, Gregory
Publisher
Society of Wood Science and Technology
Year of Publication
2010
Format
Journal Article
Material
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
Topic
General Information
Keywords
Aspen
Permeability
Density
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood and Fiber Science
Summary
The in-plane permeability was measured for thick, unidirectional oriented strand lumber made from aspen (Populus tremuloides) strands and pressed to five different densities. The press cycle was such that the vertical density profile of the panels was uniform. Specimens were cut from the boards and sealed inside a specially designed specimen holder; this jig was connected to a permeability measurement apparatus and in-plane permeability measured parallel, perpendicular, and 45° to the strand orientation. Permeability decreased markedly with increasing board density. The highest permeability was in the strand alignment direction and lowest perpendicular to it. The permeability in the 45° direction fell between those in parallel and perpendicular to strand alignment. A polynomial equation was fit to the results of each direction with r2 of 0.938 and 0.993. The in-plane distribution of permeability as a function of flow direction was obtained and its vector diagram was lenticular in shape.
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Acoustic Emission of Bolt-Bearing Testing on Structural Composite Lumbers

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1443
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
Author
Du, Yicheng
Zhang, Jilei
Shi, Sheldon
Publisher
Society of Wood Science and Technology
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Acoustic Emission
Bolted Connection
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood and Fiber Science
Summary
Acoustic emission (AE) characteristics of full-hole bolt-bearing testing on structural compositelumbers (SCL) including laminated veneer lumber (LVL) and oriented strand lumber (OSL) were investigated. The main conclusion is that AE cumulative counts vs time curves of the tested SCL in this study can be characterized with three distinct regions in terms of AE count rates: Region I with a lower constant count rate, Region II with varied and increased count rates, and Region III with a higher constant count rate. Differences in AE count rates of these three regions occurred between LVL and OSL. Also, within each tested SCL, differences in AE count rates were observed among the three regions. These differences in terms of AE count rates between two tested SCL indicate that different types of wood-based composites might have different AE characteristics in terms of the count rate changes when they are subjected to increased bolt compression load. In other words, these differences in AE characteristics between the two tested materials suggest AE “signatures” do exist for SCL bolt connections.
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Directives and Explanatory Guide for Mass Timber Buildings of up to 12 Storeys

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1969
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Veilleux, Lise
Gagnon, Sylvain
Dagenais, Christian
Publisher
Régie du bâtiment du Québec
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Seismic
Keywords
Tall Wood
Multi-Storey
Construction
Fire Resistance Rating
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This guide provides the directives needed for designers of tall wood buildings to produce their designs, plans and specifications. It has been developed to give them the information and general concepts required, based on the selected system. The elements and details required to comply with the guidelines in this document must be incorporated from a project’s initial design phase. Part 1 – Guidelines contains several sections, including one that deals with basic conditions and describes the minimum general conditions applicable to any project for the construction of a wood building exceeding 6 storeys. The following sections contain special provisions that specify and complete the basic conditions.
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Guide for On-site Moisture Management of Wood Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1968
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Publisher
BC Housing Research Centre
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Moisture Management
Construction
Risk Mitigation
Prefabrication
Multi-Storey
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Overall moisture management during construction has become increasingly important due to the increase in building height and area, which potentially prolongs the exposure to inclement weather, and the overall increase in speed of construction, which may not allow adequate time for drying to occur. This report provides guidelines and relevant information about on-site moisture management practices that can be adapted to suit a range of wood construction projects. It aims to help designers and construction companies and builders assess the potential for moisture-related issues arising during the construction phase of a wood-building project and identify the appropriate actions to mitigate such risk.
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Influence of Layer and Laminate Characteristics on Shear Properties of Cross Laminated Timber and Hybrids

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1543
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
Application
Floors
Author
Niederwestberg, Jan
Chui, Ying Hei
Gong, Meng
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Shear Tests
Aspect Ratio
Growth Ring Orientation
Edge-Gluing
Static Test
Modal Test
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1113-1122
Summary
In-plane shear and planar shear due to out-of-plane bending are important properties for the design of CLT-type floor systems. Properties of CLT-type panels are influenced by the orientation of the layer’s major stiffness directions and the properties of their layers. The layers are influenced by their characteristics, laminate aspect ratio, growth ring orientation and edge-gluing. In order to utilize the mechanical potential of CLT-type panels, it is necessary to understand the effects of layer and laminate properties on CLT performance. CLT and CLT-hybrid panels were tested in planar and in-plane shear tests. The shear properties were evaluated using static and modal test procedures, the accuracy of non-destructive test methods was evaluated. Relationships between specimen properties and the characteristics of laminates and layers, such as aspect ratio, growth ring orientation and edge-gluing, were established.
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Bending Properties of Innovative Multi-Layer Composite Laminated Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1985
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
Application
Beams
Author
Zhou, Jianhui
Niederwestberg, Jan
Chui, Ying Hei
Gong, Meng
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Bending Stiffness
Shear Stiffness
Moment Capacity
Failure Modes
Three Point Bending Test
Modal Test
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
An innovative multi-layer (3 and 5) composite laminated panel (CLP) with various layups were developed using sawn lumber and structural composite lumber (SCL) to address the rolling shear and gap issues of cross laminated timber (CLT). The bending properties including apparent and effective bending stiffness, shear stiffness, moment capacities and failure modes of CLPs were evaluated by a combination of modal tests and third-point bending tests of beam specimens cut from the panels. The static bending test results showed that the apparent bending stiffness values of 3-layer and 5-layer CLPs were up to 20% and 43% higher than the corresponding values of 3-layer and 5-layer generic CLT, respectively. The bending moment capacity values of 3-layer and 5-layer CLPs were up to 37% and 87% higher than the corresponding values of 3-layer and 5-layer generic CLT, respectively. The use of SCL in transverse layers eliminated the potential rolling shear failure in CLT and increased the stiffness properties. The apparent and effective bending stiffness predicted by shear analogy method had a good agreement with corresponding values measured by bending tests and/or modal tests. The prediction of bending moment capacity using shear analogy method cannot be validated due to the rolling shear failure and tension failure modes observed in certain groups.
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Preliminary Assessment of Moisture-Related Properties for Structural Composite Lumber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1175
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Moisture
Serviceability
Material
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Report
Material
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Moisture
Serviceability
Keywords
Water Absorption
Vapour Permeance
Vapour Sorption
Dimensional Stability
Building Envelope
Moisture Management
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Fifteen structural composite lumber (SCL) products including laminated-veneer lumber (LVL), laminated strand lumber (LSL), oriented strand lumber (OSL), and parallel strand lumber (PSL) provided by Boise Cascade, LP, West Fraser, and Weyerhaeuser were tested for moisture-related properties in this study, also covering four reference materials: 16-mm Oriented Strand Board (OSB), 19-mm Canadian Softwood Plywood (plywood), 38-mm Douglas-fir and lodgepole pine solid wood. Water absorption, vabour permeance, vapour sorption, and dimensional stability were measured with limited replication by following relevant standards for a purpose of assisting in improving building design and construction, such as hygrothermal modelling of building envelope assemblies, design for vertical differential movement, and on-site moisture management.
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Influence of Strand Size, Board Density, and Adhesive Type on Characteristics of Oriented Strand Lumber Boards Manufactured from Pine Strands

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2511
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
Application
Beams

Mechanical and Physical Properties of Oriented Strand Lumber (OSL): The Effect of Fortification Level of Nanowollastonite on UF Resin

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2513
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

12 records – page 1 of 2.