Skip header and navigation

Refine Results By

335 records – page 1 of 17.

Accommodating Movement in High-Rise Wood-Frame Building Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1875
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Other Materials
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Walls
Author
Howe, Richard
Publisher
Forest Products Society
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Journal Article
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Other Materials
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Keywords
Detailing
Shrinkage
Differential Movement
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood Design Focus
Summary
Ease of construction and favorable overall costs relative to other construction types are making high-rise (i.e., 4- and 5-story) wood frame construction increasingly popular. With these buildings increasing in height, there is a greater impetus on designers to address frame and finishes movement in such construction. As we all know, buildings are dynamic creatures experiencing a variety of movements during construction and over their service life. In wood frame construction, it is important to consider not only absolute movement but also differential movement between dissimilar materials. This article focuses on differential movement issues and how to recognize their potential and avoid problems by effective detailing.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Achieving Sustainable Urban Buildings with Seismically Resilient Mass Timber Core Wall and Floor System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2802
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Cores
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Portland State University
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Cores
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Hold-Down
Seismic Performance
Core Walls
Parametric Analysis
Deformation Capacity
Overstrength
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
Tall Wood Buildings
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Peter Dusicka at Portland State University (United States)
Summary
The urgency in increasing growth in densely populated urban areas, reducing the carbon footprint of new buildings, and targeting rapid return to occupancy following disastrous earthquakes has created a need to reexamine the structural systems of mid- to high-rise buildings. To address these sustainability and seismic resiliency needs, the objective of this research is to enable an all-timber material system in a way that will include architectural as well as structural considerations. Utilization of mass timber is societally important in providing buildings that store, instead of generate, carbon and increase the economic opportunity for depressed timber-producing regions of the country. This research will focus on buildings with core walls because those building types are some of the most common for contemporary urban mid- to high-rise construction. The open floor layout will allow for commercial and mixed-use occupancies, but also will contain significant technical knowledge gaps hindering their implementation with mass timber. The research plan has been formulated to fill these gaps by: (1) developing suitable mid- to high-rise archetypes with input from multiple stakeholders, (2) conducting parametric system-level seismic performance investigations, (3) developing new critical components, (4) validating the performance with large-scale experimentation, and (5) bridging the industry information gaps by incorporating teaching modules within an existing educational and outreach framework. Situated in the heart of a timber-producing region, the multi-disciplinary team will utilize the local design professional community with timber experience and Portland State University's recently implemented Green Building Scholars program to deliver technical outcomes that directly impact the surrounding environment. Research outcomes will advance knowledge at the system performance level as well as at the critical component level. The investigated building system will incorporate cross laminated timber cores, floors, and glulam structural members. Using mass timber will present challenges in effectively achieving the goal of desirable seismic performance, especially seismic resiliency. These challenges will be addressed at the system level by a unique combination of core rocking combined with beam and floor interaction to achieve non-linear elastic behavior. This system behavior will eliminate the need for post-tensioning to achieve re-centering, but will introduce new parameters that can directly influence the lateral behavior. This research will study the effects of these parameters on the overall building behavior and will develop a methodology in which designers could use these parameters to strategically control the building seismic response. These key parameters will be investigated using parametric numerical analyses as well as large-scale, sub-system experimentation. One of the critical components of the system will be the hold-down, a device that connects the timber core to the foundation and provides hysteretic energy dissipation. Strength requirements and deformation demands in mid- to high-rise buildings, along with integration with mass timber, will necessitate the advancement of knowledge in developing this low-damage component. The investigated hold-down will have large deformation capability with readily replaceable parts. Moreover, the hold-down will have the potential to reduce strength of the component in a controlled and repeatable way at large deformations, while maintaining original strength at low deformations. This component characteristic can reduce the overall system overstrength, which in turn will have beneficial economic implications. Reducing the carbon footprint of new construction, linking rural and urban economies, and increasing the longevity of buildings in seismic zones are all goals that this mass timber research will advance and will be critical to the sustainable development of cities moving forward.
Resource Link
Less detail

Acoustical Guide: Acoustic Research Report on Mass Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1839
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Floors
Organization
AcoustiTECH
Editor
Dompierre, David
Garant, Samuel
Publisher
AcoustiTECH
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Mass Timber
Sound Absorption
Impact Sound Insulation
Research Status
Complete
Summary
AcoustiTECH is a North American leader in acoustic solitions and has quickly become the reference standard in the industry. For 25 years, AcoustiTECH has teamed uo with Architects, builders, general contractors, acoustic consultants and other stakeholders to help them achieve their vision by providing proven acoustical solutions and expertise. AcoustiTECH looks at the specific requirements of each individual project, evaluates the requirements, determines the needs and provides personalized solutions. AcoustiTECH's approach is unique, efficient and reliable. We possess our own acoustic laboratory that we use for our research and development in order to recommend the best acoustic solutions by type of structure. Thousands of tests have been performed inclusing over 300 on heavy timber assemblies. The principal objective of creating this document is for the professionals to compare and choose from 25 assemblies the ones that suit their needs the best. The most interesting and popular assemblies have been selected and compared side by side in the same environment, built and tested by the same professional unisg the same flooring materials. It is important to note that the quality of construction can affect the performance. Indeed, construction standards and assemblies recommendations must be followed in order to reach the seeking performance.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Acoustical Performance of Mass Timber Building Elements

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2553
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Sound Insulation
Acoustic Membrane
Acoustical Performance
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Jianhui Zhou at the University of Northern British Columbia (Canada)
Summary
Building acoustics has been identified as one of the key subjects for the success of mass timber in the multi-storey building markets. The project will investigate the acoustical performance of mass timber panels produced in British Columbia. The apparent sound transmission class (ASTC) and impact insulation class (AIIC) of bare mass timber elements as wall and/ or floor elements will be measured through a lab mock-up. It is expected that a database of the sound insulation performance of British Columbia mass timber products will be developed with guidance on optimal acoustical treatments to achieve different levels of performance.
Less detail

Acoustic Performance of Timber and Timber-Concrete Composite Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue684
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Schluessel, Marc
Shrestha, Rijun
Crews, Keith
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
New Zealand
Australia
Building Code of Australia
Sound Insulation
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
A major problem in light-weight timber floors is their insufficient performance coping with impact noise in low frequencies. There are no prefabricated solutions available in Australia and New Zealand. To rectify this and enable the implementation of light-weight timber floors, a structural floor was designed and built in laminated veneer lumber (LVL). The floor was evaluated in a laboratory setting based on its behaviour and then modified with suspended ceilings and different floor toppings. Twenty-nine different floor compositions were tested. The bare floor could not reach the minimum requirement set by the Building Code of Australia (BCA) but with additional layers, a sufficient result of R'w+Ctr 53 dB and L’nT,w + CI 50 dB was reached. Doubling of the concrete mass added a marginal improvement. With concrete toppings and suspended ceiling it is possible to reach the goal in airborne and impact sound insulation. The best result was achieved by combining of additional mass and different construction layers.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Acoustics and Mass Timber: Room-to-Room Noise Control

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2925
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Application
Floors
Author
McLain, Richard
Organization
WoodWorks
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Report
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Mass
Noise Barriers
Decouplers
Floor Topping
Acoustic Mat
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The growing availability and code acceptance of mass timber—i.e., large solid wood panel products such as cross laminated timber (CLT) and nail-laminated timber (NLT)—for floor, wall and roof construction has given designers a low-carbon alternative to steel, concrete, and masonry for many applications. However, the use of mass timber in multi-family and commercial buildings presents unique acoustic challenges. While laboratory measurements of the impact and airborne sound isolation of traditional building assemblies such as light wood-frame, steel and concrete are widely available, fewer resources exist that quantify the acoustic performance of mass timber assemblies. Additionally, one of the most desired aspects of mass timber construction is the ability to leave a building’s structure exposed as finish, which createsthe need for asymmetric assemblies. With careful design and detailing, mass timber buildings can meet the acoustic performance expectations of most building types.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Acoustics: Sound Insulation in Mid-Rise Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue37
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Floors
Walls
Author
Schoenwald, Stefan
Zeitler, Berndt
King, Frances
Sabourin, Ivan
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Acoustics
Mid-Rise
Sound Insulation
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This client report on the acoustics research component regarding sound insulation of elements and systems for mid-rise wood buildings is structured into a main part and four appendices. The main part outlines the background, main research considerations and summarizes conducted research and major outcomes briefly. It is structured like the Acoustics tasks in the Statement of Work of the Mid-rise Wood research project to identify accomplishments. For details on the research, testing and results, the main part references to four appendices that contain more details including test plans, test methods, specimen descriptions and all test data that is vetted so far.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Acoustic Testing and Wood Supply for Framework Office Building in Portland, OR

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1830
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Ceilings
Walls
Roofs
Wood Building Systems
Organization
ARUP
StructureCraft
InterTek
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Ceilings
Walls
Roofs
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Sound Transmission
Impact Noise Transmission
Concrete Topping
Research Status
Complete
Series
Framework: An Urban + Rural Design
Summary
Architectural Testing, Inc., an Intertek company (Intertek-ATI), was contracted to conduct airborne sound transmission loss and impact sound transmission tests. The complete test data is included as attachments to this report. The full test specimen was assembled on the day of testing by Intertek-ATI. All materials provided by the client were installed on an existing Intertek-ATI assembly (Cross Laminated Timber - 175 mm) utilizing Intertek-ATI-supplied.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Acoustic Testing of CLT and Glulam Floor Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1863
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Sabourin, Ivan
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Publisher
Regupol America
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Transmission Loss
Impact Sound Transmission
Impact Sound Pressure Level
Research Status
Complete
Series
Nordic Engineered Wood Report
Summary
This report contains the transmission loss (TL) results measured in accordance with ASTM E90-09 and the normalized impact sound pressure level (NISPL) results measured in accordance with ASTM E492-09 of 13 cross-laminated timber (CLT) floor assemblies and 5 glulam floor assemblies. The report also contains the nonstandard impact sound pressure level results measured on 6 different small patch specimens. Summary tables containing the specimen number, sketch, short description, the sound transmission class (STC) and impact isolation class (IIC) ratings, as well as, the page number of the detailed test reports are provided starting on page 5. A brief analysis of the floors tested as part of this test series is provided after the summary tables on page 9. The standard test reports of the tested floor assemblies begin on page 16. The floor assemblies were built and tested between January and April 2016.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Addendum to RR-335: Sound Transmission Through Nail-Laminated Timber (NLT) Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1868
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Author
Mahn, Jeffrey
Quirt, David
Hoeller, Christoph
Mueller-Trapet, Markus
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Publisher
National Research Council Canada. Construction
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Report
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Sound Insulation
Assembly
Sound Transmission Class
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report is published as an addendum to NRC Research Report RR-335 “Apparent Sound Insulation in Cross-Laminated Timber Buildings." It is intended that this addendum will be merged with RR-335 in the future as a report for predicting the sound insulation in buildings using mass-timber constructions including NLT assemblies. This report presents the results from experimental studies of airborne sound transmission through assemblies of nail-laminated timber (NLT) with various linings. To put the data presented in this report in the proper context, this report begins with a brief explanation of calculation procedures to predict the apparent sound transmission class (ASTC) between adjacent spaces in a building whose structure is a combination of mass-timber assemblies such as nail-laminated timber (NLT) or cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Advanced Methods of Encapsulation

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue41
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Roy-Poirier, Audrey
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Codes
Encapsulation
Type X Gypsum Board
National Building Code of Canada
Tall Wood
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project aims to support the construction of tall wood buildings by identifying encapsulation methods that provide adequate protection of mass timber elements; the intention is that these methods could potentially be applied to mass timber elements so that the overall assembly could achive a 2 h fire resistance rating.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Advanced Wood-Based Solutions for Mid-Rise and High-Rise Construction: In-Situ Testing of the Origine 13-Storey Building for Vibration and Acoustic Performances

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1474
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Walls
Author
Hu, Lin
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Walls
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Serviceability
Keywords
Origine
Natural Frequencies
Damping Ratios
Sound Insulation
Ambient Vibration Tests
Static Deflection
Apparent Sound Transmission Class
Apparent Impact Insulation Class
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Serviceability performance studied covers three different performance attributes of a building. These attributes are 1) vibration of the whole building structure, 2) vibration of the floor system, typically in regards to motions in a localized area within the entire floor plate, and 3) sound insulation performance of the wall and floor assemblies. Serviceability performance of a building is important as it affects the comfort of its occupants and the functionality of sensitive equipment as well. Many physical factors influence these performances. Designers use various parameters to account for them in their designs and different criteria to manage these performances. Lack of data, knowledge and experience of sound and vibration performance of tall wood buildings is one of the issues related to design and construction of tall wood buildings. In order to bridge the gaps in the data, knowledge, and experience of sound and vibration performance of tall wood buildings, FPInnovations conducted a three-phase performance testing on the Origine 13-storey CLT building of 40.9 m tall in Quebec city. It was the tallest wood building in Eastern Canada in 2017.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Advanced Wood-Based Solutions for Mid-Rise and High-Rise Construction: Proposed Vibration-Controlled Design Criterion for Supporting Beams

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1178
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Mechanical Properties
Application
Floors
Author
Hu, Lin
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Report
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Floor Supporting Beam
Bending Stiffness
Research Status
Complete
Summary
For wood floor systems, their vibration performance is significantly dependent on the conditions of their supports, specifically the rigidity of the support. Detrimental effects could result if the floor supports do not have sufficient rigidity. This is special ture for floor supporting beams. The problem of vibrating floor due to flexible supporting beams can be solved through proper design of the supporting beams. However, there is currently no criterion set for the minimum requirement for floor supporting beam stiffness to ensure the beam is rigid enough. Designers’ current practice is to use the uniform load deflection criteria specified in the code for designing the supporting beams. This criterion is based on certain ratios of the floor span (e.g. L/360, L/480 etc.). The disadvantage of this approach is that it allows larger deflections for longer-span beams than for shorter beams. This means that engineers have to use their experience and judgement to select a proper ratio, particularly for the long-span beams. Therefore, a better vibration-controlled design criterion for supporting beams is needed. It is recommended to further verify the ruggedness of the proposed stiffness criterion for floor supporting beams using new field supporting beam data whenever they become available.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Advancement of Timber Panels as Structural Elements in Composite Floor Systems of Timber-Steel Hybrid Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2785
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Hybrid Building Systems
Organization
Auburn University
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
United States
Summary
Auburn University’s (AU) School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences (SFWS) in Alabama actively works to increase awareness of the benefits of CLT along with hybrid systems for more widespread adoption in multiple building segments. AU’s two-year project proposal outlines a plan that will establish a preliminary design for the usage of a timber-steel composite system, utilizing CLT or laminated veneer lumber (LVL), as an option that will replace reinforced concrete slabs to improve the structural performance for buildings six stories or more.
Less detail

Advancement of Timber Panels as Structural Elements in Timber-Steel Composite Floor Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2844
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Application
Floors
Organization
Auburn University
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Mass Timber
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Kadir Sener at Auburn University (United States)
Summary
While the emphasis in the timber industry understandably focuses predominately on complete mass timber structures, opportunities to substantially expand the mass timber market exist using composite timber-steel systems. Timber-steel composite systems have a high potential to be an economically, architecturally, and structurally feasible system to expand the usage of timber panels for mid-rise and high-rise structures where mass timber is currently not a feasible option. In this novel system, prefabricated timber panels replace reinforced concrete slabs to provide the floor and diaphragm elements that work compositely with steel beams and to improve the structural performance compared to either individual material. Considerable testing effort outside the US has explored the feasibility and benefits of these composite systems. This has led to implementation of this novel system on a number of international construction projects. However, the topic has not been assimilated by researchers and practitioners in the US. Hence, this proposal focuses on identifying and removing barriers and providing design guidance on using steel-timber composite systems in US construction. The proposal: (i) Engages a diverse body of stakeholders in an advisory panel and workshop, (ii) Completes engineering-based testing and analysis to demonstrate feasibility, (iii) Performs constructability studies (i.e., construction cost, speed, env. impact), and (iv) Establishes preliminary design guidelines and approaches. The goal of the project will be to demonstrate the performance and economy of a timber-steel composite system(s) and establish preliminary design guidelines and approaches for target stakeholders. Ultimately, the project will develop experimentally validated design-detailing configurations and establish design specifications for new mass timber markets in multiple construction sectors.
Less detail

Alternate Load-Path Analysis for Mid-Rise Mass-Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1233
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Author
Mpidi Bita, Hercend
Tannert, Thomas
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Alternate Load-Path Analysis
Disproportionate Collapse
Lateral Loads
Conference
Structures Conference 2018
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 19–21, 2018, Fort Worth, Texas
Summary
This paper presents an investigation of possible disproportionate collapse for a nine-storey flat-plate timber building, designed for gravity and lateral loads. The alternate load-path analysis method is used to understand the structural response under various removal speeds. The loss of the corner and penultimate ground floor columns are the two cases selected to investigate the contribution of the cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels and their connections, towards disproportionate collapse prevention. The results show that the proposed building is safe for both cases, if the structural elements are removed at a speed slower than 1 sec. Disproportionate collapse is observed for sudden element loss, as quicker removal speed require higher moments resistance, especially at the longitudinal and transverse CLT floor-to-floor connections. The investigation also emphasises the need for strong and stiff column-to-column structural detailing as the magnitude of the vertical downward forces, at the location of the removed columns, increases for quicker removal.
Online Access
Payment Required
Resource Link
Less detail

Analysis on Structureborne Sound Transmission at Junctions of Solid Wood Double Walls with Continuous Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1869
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Author
Schoenwald, Stefan
Zeitler, Berndt
Sabourin, Ivan
Organization
European Acoustics Association
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Sound Transmission
Sound Insulation
Radiation Efficiencies
Conference
Forum Acusticum 2014
Research Status
Complete
Notes
September 7-12, 2014, Krakow, Poland
Summary
Structure-borne sound transmission across a cross-junction of double solid timber walls with a solid timber floor was analyzed in a recent research project. Both, the double walls as well as floor slab, were of so-called Cross Laminated Timber (CLT). The floor slab was continuous across the junction for structural reasons and thus, formed a sound bridge between the elements of the double wall. To gain a better understanding of the contributions of sound transmission between the wall and floor elements from the different possible paths, a thorough analysis was conducted. Hereby, direct sound transmission through, and radiation efficiencies of, the CLT elements were measured in a direct sound transmission facility; as well as, structure-borne sound transmission between CLT elements was measured on a junction mock-up. The experimental data was used as in-put data and for validation of the engineering model of EN 12354/ISO 15712 for the prediction of flanking sound insulation in buildings. The test procedures, analysis and results of this research project are presented here.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Analytical Investigation of the Potential of Hollowcore Mass Timber Panels for Long Span Floor Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3353
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Hull, T.
Lacroix, D.
Organization
University of Waterloo
Publisher
Springer
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Long Span
Vibration Controlled Span
Conference
Proceedings of the Canadian Society of Civil Engineering Annual Conference 2021
Research Status
Complete
Notes
Page 621
Summary
Mass timber products have shown tremendous potential as sustainable structural components in large building systems. However, challenges occur when open floor plan structures are desired due to conventional flat slab floor systems having difficulties achieving the longer floor span expectations (i.e., exceeding 9 m). This paper investigates the potential of an all-wood solution, namely, hollowcore mass timber (HMT) panels, in meeting the demands of longer spans while also minimizing the use of wood material when compared to a solid slab. A 400 mm deep, 9 m long HMT panel composed of 3-layer cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels as flanges, and glulam beams as webs, is compared to the maximum commonly available CLT and dowel-laminated timber (DLT) alternatives. Two analytical methods and a finite element model are used to determine the effective bending stiffness of the HMT panel, while CSA O86 design procedures are used for the CLT and DLT panels. The effective bending stiffness of the HMT panel between the finite element model and analytical methods ranged from 1.71–1.94 and 1.14–1.29 times greater, despite being 18% and 24% lighter, than the CLT and DLT panels, respectively. Although slightly deeper, the HMT section provided a more efficient use of materials when compared to the solid slab options. The vibration-controlled span limit of the HMT panel was on average 9.8 m, which was 1.8 m and 0.9 m longer than the CLT and DLT panels, respectively. Further areas of study were also identified and will be investigated as part of future work in the broader HMT panel research program.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Analytical Procedure for Timber-Concrete Composite (TCC) System with Mechanical Connectors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3119
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Mirdad, Md Abdul Hamid
Khan, Rafid
Chui, Ying Hei
Organization
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
University of Alberta
Editor
Tullini, Nerio
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Mechanical Connectors
Progressive Yielding
Effective Bending Stiffness
Deflection
Vibration
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
Summary
In the construction of modern multi-storey mass timber structures, a composite floor system commonly specified by structural engineers is the timber–concrete composite (TCC) system, where a mass timber beam or mass timber panel (MTP) is connected to a concrete slab with mechanical connectors. The design of TCC floor systems has not been addressed in timber design standards due to a lack of suitable analytical models for predicting the serviceability and safety performance of these systems. Moreover, the interlayer connection properties have a large influence on the structural performance of a TCC system. These connection properties are often generated by testing. In this paper, an analytical approach for designing a TCC floor system is proposed that incorporates connection models to predict connection properties from basic connection component properties such as embedment and withdrawal strength/stiffness of the connector, thereby circumventing the need to perform connection tests. The analytical approach leads to the calculation of effective bending stiffness, forces in the connectors, and extreme stresses in concrete and timber of the TCC system, and can be used in design to evaluate allowable floor spans under specific design loads and criteria. An extensive parametric analysis was also conducted following the analytical procedure to investigate the TCC connection and system behaviour. It was observed that the screw spacing and timber thickness remain the most important parameters which significantly influence the TCC system behaviour.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

An Approach to CLT Diaphragm Modeling for Seismic Design with Application to a U.S. High Rise Project

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1671
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Author
Breneman, Scott
McDonnell, Eric
Zimmerman, Reid
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
US
Diaphragm
Model
High-Rise
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 3844-3852
Summary
A candidate CLT diaphragm analysis model approach is presented and evaluated as an engineering design tool motivated by the needs of seismic design in the United States. The modeling approach consists of explicitly modeling CLT panels as discrete orthotropic shell elements with connections between panels and connections from panels to structural framing modelled as two-point springs. The modeling approach has been compared to a developed CLT diaphragm design example based on U.S. standards showing the ability to obtain matching deflection results. The sensitivity of the deflection calculations to considering CLT panel-to-panel connection gap closure is investigated using a simple diaphragm example. The proposed modeling approach is also applied to the candidate floor diaphragm design for the Framework project, one of the two U.S. Tall Wood Building Prize Competition winners, currently under design. Observations from this effort are that the proposed method, while a more refined model than typically used during building design, shows promise to meet the needs of innovative CLT seismic designs where appropriate simpler diaphragm models are not available.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

335 records – page 1 of 17.