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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Acoustic Testing and Wood Supply for Framework Office Building in Portland, OR

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1830
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Ceilings
Walls
Roofs
Wood Building Systems
Organization
ARUP
StructureCraft
InterTek
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Ceilings
Walls
Roofs
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Sound Transmission
Impact Noise Transmission
Concrete Topping
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Framework: An Urban + Rural Design
Summary
A. Shop Drawings and Details for Tests B. Sound and Impact Test Results Summary C. Test 1: Sound and Impact Transmission Test - CLT D. Test 2: Sound and Impact Transmission Test - Concrete Topping E. Test 3a: Sound and Impact Transmission Test - Marmoleum F. Test 3b: Sound and Impact Transmission Test - Marmoleum G. Test 4: Sound and Impact Transmission Test - Carpet H. Test 5a: Sound and Impact Transmission Test - Luxury Vinyl Plank I. Test 5b: Sound and Impact Transmission Test - Luxury Vinyl Plank J. Test 6: Sound and Impact Transmission Test - Mechanical Roof
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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An Approach to CLT Diaphragm Modeling for Seismic Design with Application to a U.S. High-Rise Project

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1710
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors

Apparent Sound Insulation in Wood-Framed Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1952
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Floors

Effect of Realistic Boundary Conditions on the Behaviour of Cross-Laminated Timber Elements Subjected to Simulated Blast Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2361
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Author
Cote, Dominic
Publisher
University of Ottawa
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Connections
Seismic Load
Blast Loads
Fasteners
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is an emerging engineered wood product in North America. Past research effort to establish the behaviour of CLT under extreme loading conditions has focussed CLT slabs with idealized simply-supported boundary conditions. Connections between the wall and the floor systems above and below are critical to fully describing the overall behaviour of CLT structures when subjected to blast loads. The current study investigates the effects of “realistic” boundary conditions on the behaviour of cross-laminated timber walls when subjected to simulated out-of-plane blast loads. The methodology followed in the current research consists of experimental and analytical components. The experimental component was conducted in the Blast Research Laboratory at the University of Ottawa, where shock waves were applied to the specimens. Configurations with seismic detailing were considered, in order to evaluate whether existing structures that have adequate capacities to resist high seismic loads would also be capable of resisting a blast load with reasonable damage. In addition, typical connections used in construction to resist gravity and lateral loads, as well as connections designed specifically to resist a given blast load were investigated. The results indicate that the detailing of the connections appears to significantly affect the behaviour of the CLT slab. Typical detailing for platform construction where long screws connect the floor slab to the wall in end grain performed poorly and experienced brittle failure through splitting in the perpendicular to grain direction in the CLT. Bearing type connections generally behaved well and yielding in the fasteners and/or angles brackets meant that a significant portion of the energy was dissipated there reducing the energy imparted on the CLT slab significantly. Hence less displacement and thereby damage was observed in the slab. The study also concluded that using simplified tools such as single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) models together with current available material models for CLT is not sufficient to adequately describe the behaviour and estimate the damage. More testing and development of models with higher fidelity are required in order to develop robust tools for the design of CLT element subjected to blast loading.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Encapsulated Mass Timber Construction - Cost Comparison Canada: Construction, Time & Maintenance Cost-Benefit Report

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2359
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Floors
Organization
Hanscomb
Publisher
National Research Council Canada
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Floors
Topic
Cost
Keywords
Encapsulated Mass Timber Construction
Building Code
Time
Construction Time
Construction Cost
Maintenance Cost
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The Task Group on Combustible Construction is in the process of evaluating a proposed code change request related to buildings of encapsulated mass timber construction (EMTC). As part of the analysis of the code change request, an impact analysis is required that includes a cost-benefit analysis. Hanscomb was hired to provide a cost-benefit analysis and to compare the estimated value of the following: 1. The cost of constructing a building of mass timber (unprotected) versus a building constructed of encapsulated mass timber (e.g. mass timber protected with a double layer of Type X gypsum board) versus a traditional concrete and steel building. 2. The time to build a building of mass timber construction (unprotected) versus a building of encapsulated mass timber construction versus a traditional concrete and steel building. 3. The annual maintenance costs of building of mass timber construction versus a building of encapsulated mass timber construction versus a traditional concrete and steel building. For the purposes of this study two sets of conceptual floor plans and elevations have been created: 1. A 12 storey building with a Group C major occupancy (residential) where each storey is 6,000 m2 in floor area. 2. A 12 storey building with a Group D major occupancy (office) where each storey is 7,200 m2 in floor area.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Evaluation of Bending Performance for Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) Made Out of Poplar (Populus Alba)

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1218
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Haftkhani, Akbar
Layeghi, Mohammad
Ebrahimi, Ghanbar
Pourtahmasi, Kambiz
Publisher
Iranian Scientific Association of Wood and Paper Industries
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Islamic Republic of Iran
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Bending Strength
Poplar
Modulus of Rupture
Modulus of Elasticity
Polyurethane
Language
Persian
Research Status
Complete
Series
Iranian Journal of Wood and Paper Industries
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Innovative Composite Steel-Timber Floors with Prefabricated Modular Components

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1350
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Steel-Timber Composite
Application
Floors

Moisture Uptake Testing for CLT Floor Panels in a Tall Wood Building in Vancouver

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2343
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Lepage, Robert
Higgins, James
Finch, Graham
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Water Resistance
Coatings
Hygrothermal Models
Moisture Content
Sensors
Biodegradation
Funghi
Language
English
Conference
Canadian Conference on Building Science and Technology
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross laminated timber (CLT) and mass timber construction is a promising structural technology that harnesses the advantageous structural properties of wood combined with renewability and carbon sequestering capacities not readily found in other major structural materials. However, as an organic material, mass timber is susceptible to biodeterioration, and when considered in conjunction with increased use of engineered wood materials, particularly in more extreme environments and exposures, it requires careful assessments to ensure long-term performance. A promising approach towards reducing construction moisture in CLT and other mass timber assemblies is to protect the surfaces with a water-resistant coating. To assess this approach, a calibrated hygrothermal model was developed with small and large scale CLT samples, instrumented with moisture content sensors at different depths, and treated with different types of water resistant coatings exposed to the Vancouver climate. The models were further validated with additional moisture content sensors installed in a mock-up floor structure of an actual CLT building under construction. Biodeterioration studies assessing fungal colonization were undertaken using the modified VTT growth method and a Dose-Response model for decay potential. The research indicates that CLT and mass timber is susceptible to dangerously high moisture contents, particularly when exposed to liquid water in horizontal applications. However, a non-porous, vapour impermeable coating, when applied on dry CLT, appears to significantly reduce the moisture load and effectively eliminate the risk of biodeterioration. This work strongly suggests that future use of CLT consider applications of a protective water-resistant coating at the manufacturing plant to resist construction moisture. The fungal study also highlights the need for a limit state design for biodeterioration to countenance variance between predicted and observed conditions.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Nail-Laminated Timber Canadian Design and Construction Guide

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2243
Edition
1.1
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Fire
General Information
Moisture
Seismic
Site Construction Management
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Editor
Holt, Rebecca
Luthi, Tanya
Dickof, Carla
Edition
1.1
Publisher
Binational Softwood Lumber Council
Forestry Innovation Investment
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Topic
Design and Systems
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Fire
General Information
Moisture
Seismic
Site Construction Management
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This Design and Construction Guide (the Guide) provides the Canadian design and construction industry with immediate support and guidance to ensure safe, predictable, and economical use of NLT. It is intended to offer practical strategies, advice, and guidance, transferring knowledge and lessons learned from those with experience. This Guide focuses on design and construction considerations for floor and roof systems pertaining to current Canadian construction practice and standards. While NLT is being used for vertical elements for walls, stair shafts, and elevator shafts, this Guide provides the greatest depth of direction for common horizontal applications. The information included here is supplemental to wood design and construction best practices and is specific to the application of NLT. Built examples are included to illustrate real application and visual reference as much as possible.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Nail-Laminated Timber U.S. Design and Construction Guide

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue834
Edition
1.0
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Design and Systems
Fire
General Information
Moisture
Seismic
Site Construction Management
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Editor
Holt, Rebecca Luthi, Tanya Dickof, Carla
Edition
1.0
Publisher
Binational Softwood Lumber Council
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Book
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Design and Systems
Fire
General Information
Moisture
Seismic
Site Construction Management
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This Design and Construction Guide (the Guide) provides the U.S. design and construction community with guidance to ensure safe, predictable, and economical use of NLT. It is intended to offer practical strategies, advice, and guidance, transferring knowledge and lessons learned from NLT project experience. This Guide focuses on design and construction considerations for floor and roof systems pertaining to U.S. construction practice and standards. While NLT is being used for vertical elements for walls, stair shafts, and elevator shafts, this Guide provides the greatest depth of direction for more common horizontal applications. The information included here is supplemental to wood design and construction best practices and is specific to the application of NLT. Built examples are included to illustrate real application and visual reference as much as possible.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.