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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Accommodating Movement in High-Rise Wood-Frame Building Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1875
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Other Materials
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Walls

Block Shear Testing of CLT Panels: An Exploratory Study

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2624
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Casilla, Romulo
Pirvu, Ciprian
Wang, Brad
Lum, Conroy
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2011
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Adhesive
Block Shear Test
Failure
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
A study was conducted with the primary objective of examining the efficacy of a standard block shear test method to assess the bond quality of cross-laminated timber (CLT) products. The secondary objective was to examine the effect of pressure and adhesive type on the block shear properties of CLT panels. The wood material used for the CLT samples was Select grade nominal 25 x 152-mm (1 x 6-inch) Hem-Fir. Three adhesive types were evaluated under two test conditions: dry and vacuum-pressure-dry (VPD), the latter as described in CSA standard O112.10. Shear strength and wood failure were evaluated for each test condition. Among the four properties evaluated (dry and VPD shear strength, and dry and VPD wood failure), only the VPD wood failure showed consistency in assessing the bond quality of the CLT panels in terms of the factors (pressure and adhesive type) evaluated. Adhesive type had a strong effect on VPD wood failure. The different performance levels of the three adhesives were useful in providing insights into how the VPD block shear wood failure test responds to significant changes in CLT manufacturing parameters. The pressure used in fabricating the CLT panels showed a strong effect on VPD wood failure as demonstrated for one of the adhesives. VPD wood failure decreased with decreasing pressure. Although dry shear wood failure was able to detect the effect of pressure, it failed to detect the effect of adhesive type on the bond quality of the CLT panels. These results provide support as to the effectiveness of the VPD block shear wood failure test in assessing the bond quality of CLT panels. The VPD conditioning treatment was able to identify poor bondline manufacturing conditions by observed changes in the mode of failure, which is also considered an indication of wood-adhesive bond durability. These results corroborate those obtained from the delamination test conducted in a previous study (Casilla et al. 2011). Along with the delamination test proposed in an earlier report, the VPD block shear wood failure can be used to assess the CLT bond quality. Although promising, more testing is needed to assess whether the VPD block shear wood failure can be used in lieu of the delamination test. The other properties studied (shear strength and dry wood failure), however, were not found to be useful in consistently assessing bond line manufacturing quality.
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Cost, Time and Environmental Impacts of the Construction of the New NMIT Arts and Media Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue251
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
John, Stephen
Mulligan, Kerry
Perez, Nicolas
Love, Simon
Page, Ian
Organization
University of Canterbury
Year of Publication
2011
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Report
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Keywords
Life Cycle Cost Study
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report was produced by the University of Canterbury for the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry under Expression of Interest MAF POL 0910-11665. The report covers extensive research carried out on the construction of the new Arts and Media building at Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology in Nelson, New Zealand, between March 2010 and June 2011. The collaborative research programme was directed by the Department of Civil and Natural Resources Engineering at the University of Canterbury (UC), Christchurch. Major contributions to the research programme were made by third-party industry consultants and reported in separate documents – a copy of all the original reports is included in the Appendices ; ScionResearch - Carbon and Energy Footprint of a new three storey building at Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology (NMIT), Simon Love (2011); BRANZ (Building Research Association of New Zealand) - Nelson-Marlborough Institute of Technology Arts Building – An assessement of life cycle costs for alternative designs (BRANZ report E568), Ian Page (2010); Aurecon Group and ISJ Architects (working together) – NMIT Alternative Structural Design; Ref. 210688-001 (August, 2010).
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Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) Plane Structures Under Concentrated Loading from Point Supports - Shear Design including Reinforcements

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1572
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Mestek, Peter
Organization
Technical University of Munich
Year of Publication
2011
Country of Publication
Germany
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Point-Supported
Concentrated Loads
Shear
Rolling Shear
Reinforcement
Screws
Biaxial
Language
German
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This thesis deals with the shear design of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) elements stressed by concentrated loads which are locally reinforced by means of self-tapping screws with continuous threads. A simplified model is presented using an effective width for the calculation of the shear stresses in the vicinity of point supports or concentrated loads. Laboratory tests supply material-mechanical principles to determine the interaction of rolling shear stresses and compression perpendicular to the grain. In addition to experimental tests theoretical models are developed to examine the load bearing behaviour of CLT-elements reinforced by self-tapping screws. Preliminary tests with plate elements provide initial experience with these reinforcements under biaxial load transfer. Finally a design concept validated by means of the test results is proposed.
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Delamination Testing of CLT Panels: An Exploratory Study

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2626
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Casilla, Romulo
Pirvu, Ciprian
Wang, Brad
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2011
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Adhesive
Bond Quality
Delamination Test
Strength
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
A study was conducted with the primary objective of examining the efficacy of delamination test using cylindrical core specimens to assess the bond quality of cross laminated timber (CLT) products. A prototype coring drill bit was fabricated to prepare a cylindrical-shaped specimen, the height of which corresponds to the full thickness of the CLT panel. A secondary objective was to examine the effect of pressure, adhesive type, number of plies, and specimen shape on the delamination resistance of CLT panels. The wood material used for the CLT samples was Select grade nominal 1 x 6-inch Hem-Fir boards. Examples of three adhesive types were evaluated, which were designated as A, B, and C. The delamination tests used were as described in CAN / CSA O122-06 and EN 302-2. Cylindrical specimen extracted as core was found satisfactory as a test specimen type for use in delamination testing of CLT product. Its efficacy was comparable to that of a square cross-section specimen. The former is recommended as it can be extracted from thicker panels and from any location in the panel. It would also be more convenient to plug the round hole. Adhesive type had a strong effect on delamination resistance based on the two delamination tests used. Adhesive A exhibited the greatest delamination resistance, followed in decreasing order, by adhesives C and B. It should be noted that no effort was made to find the optimum CLT manufacturing parameters for each type of adhesive. Therefore the relative rankings of the adhesives tested may not be representative. However, for the purposes of this study, the different performance levels from the three adhesives are useful in providing insight into how the proposed delamination test responds to significant changes in CLT manufacturing parameters. Pressure used in fabricating the CLT panel showed a strong effect on delamination resistance as demonstrated for one of the adhesives. Delamination resistance decreased with decreasing pressure. The effect of the number of plies in the CLT panel was dependent upon the type of adhesive, and this was probably related to the adhesive’s assembly time characteristic. These results provide support as to the effectiveness of delamination test in assessing the moisture durability of CLT panels. It was able to differentiate the performance in delamination resistance among different types of adhesives, and able to detect the effect of manufacturing parameters such as pressure and increased number of plies in CLT construction. The test procedure described in CAN / CSA O122-06 appears to be reasonable in the delamination resistance assessment of CLT panels for qualification and quality control testing. Based on the results of the study along with some background information and guidelines, delamination requirements for CLT panels are proposed. The permitted delamination values are greater than those currently specified for laminated and fingerjoined lumber products. This is in recognition of the higher bond line stresses when bonded perpendicular laminations (i.e. CLT) are exposed to the delamination wetting and drying cycles, as opposed to parallel laminations (i.e. glulam or fingerjoints).
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Determining Optimised H3 LOSP Treatment Options for Decay Protection in Softwood Glulam

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1930
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Cookson, Laurie
Publisher
Forest & Wood Products Australia
Year of Publication
2011
Country of Publication
Australia
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
LOSP
CCA
TBTN
Treated Wood
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
ISBN
978-1-921763-29-8
Online Access
Free
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Displacement-Based Seismic Design of Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1891
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Floors
Beams
Columns
Frames
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Design and Systems
Application
Bridges and Spans
Author
Mettem, Christopher
Publisher
Taylor&Francis Group
Year of Publication
2011
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Book/Guide
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Timber Construction
Bridge
Span
Durability
Serviceability
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
ISBN
9780203720851
Online Access
Payment Required
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Very Tall Wooden Buildings with Cross Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1190
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Van de Kuilen, Jan-Willem
Ceccotti, Ario
Xia, Zhouyan
He, Minjuan
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2011
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Concrete Core
Multi-Storey
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Procedia Engineering
Summary
Cross Laminated Timber (CLT, XLAM) is a product extremely well suited for multi-storey buildings because of its versatility. With lengths up to 16 meters and the possibility of extending with mechanical joints or glued connections, widths of up to 2.5 meters depending on manufacturer and thicknesses up to 500 mm, almost any necessary shape can be found on the market today. Developments are still going on rapidly and new possibilities and new applications far from being exhausted. One such new possibility is the use of CLT elements in a combination with a concrete core and structural outriggers in very high buildings, a ´wood-concrete skyscraper. CLT has already been shown to be very efficient in multi-storey buildings up to 10 storeys. In this paper, an analysis is given of how a concrete core and CLT walls can be used to design very tall buildings in the range of up to 150 meters, but for more than 80% made of timber products. Timber can become an alternative in rapidly expanding cities, where there is a need for high apartment buildings. The building layout uses outriggers at certain intervals, integrated tension cables and CLT structural wall elements in the facades. The design makes optimal use of the advantages of light-weight building elements with comparable structural performance as traditional concrete elements. Savings during the erection stage in terms of money and time are highlighted as well as the CO2 emissions of such a building in comparison with concrete. A concept of the building has been analysed for the location of Shanghai according to the Chinese wind load specifications.
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Wind-Induced Vibration of Tall Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1105
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Wind
Connections
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Reynolds, Thomas
Chang, Wen-Shao
Harris, Richard
Organization
TRADA
Year of Publication
2011
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Wind
Connections
Keywords
Across-Wind Vibration
Turbulence
Along-Wind Vibration
Vortex Shedding
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Wind-induced vibration is an important design consideration in tall buildings in any structural material. The two main forms of wind-induced vibration - across-wind vibration due to vortex shedding and along-wind vibration due to turbulence - were taken into consideration when undertaking this study. Both types are addressed in Eurocode 1. This research summary discusses a study which, following a sensitivity study into the effect of stiffness and damping on wind-induced vibration, addresses a shortfall in current knowledge of stiffness in dowel-type connections. This type of connection is found in the glulam frame and CLT structures currently at the forefront of tall timber construction, and its behaviour was investigated by measuring and analysing stiffness and damping under oscillating loads representative of wind-induced vibration. This research summary covers a number of factors relating to wind-induced vibration which must be considered when constructing a tall timber building, such as how to assess connection stiffness under in-service vibration. The various conditions were then applied to a case study - the proposed Barentshaus building.
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10 records – page 1 of 1.