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42 records – page 1 of 5.

Accurate Strength Parameters for Fasteners with Examples for Ring Shank Nails

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1510
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Munch-Andersen, Jørgen
Svensson, Staffan
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Withdrawal Test
Ring Shank Nails
Fasteners
Strength
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 344-352
Summary
Strength parameters for fasteners determined in accordance with the methods prescribed for the European CE-marking leads to quite different values for seemingly similar products from different manufactures. The results are hardly repeatable, to some extent due to difficulties in selecting representative timber samples for the testing. Beside this uncertainty, the declared values available to the designer concerns only structural timber, so no strength parameters are available for common engineered wood products such as LVL or plywood
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Behavior of Timber-Concrete Composite Beams with Two Types of Steel Dowel Connectors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1996
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Author
Molina, Julio
Calil Junior, Carlito
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
South Korea
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Steel Dowels
Strength
Stiffness
Mohler Model
Shear Tests
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Behaviour of Mass Timber Panel-Concrete Connections with Inclined Self-Tapping Screws and Insulation Layer

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1984
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors

Block Shear Failure Mode of Axially Loaded Groups of Screws

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1512
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Author
Mahlknecht, Ursula
Brandner, Reinhard
Augustin, Manfred
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Self-Tapping Screws
Block Shear Model
Stiffness
Strength
Bending Stresses
Axially-Loaded
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 362-371
Summary
Self-tapping screws are efficient and flexible fasteners, applicable for many types of connections. Investigations on axially loaded groups of screws pointed out, that small spacing between the screws lead to block shear failure mode. So far, block and plug shear failure mode are only analysed for laterally loaded fasteners. Corresponding models cannot be simple transferred to primary axially loaded screws, because of their load insertion continuously along the effective thread featuring a thread-fibre angle perpendicular or with an angle to grain. Results gained by means of two different test configurations, with constant 90° thread-fibre angle but different configurations of group of screws and support conditions are presented. A block shear model is presented, and for mean values for stiffness and strength properties as model parameters are discussed together with values for parameters related to the force distribution over the effective thread length for the first test configuration. Agreement between model and test results was found on a conservative basis. As outlook, considerations of additional bending stresses as well as parameter optimisation are seen as prerequisites and next steps for further model improvement and practicality.
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Connection Performance for LVL-Concrete Composite Floor System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue292
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Fong Lee, Yen
Abd. Ghafar, Nor
Abd. Rahman, Norashidah
Yeoh, David
Organization
International Integrated Engineering Summit (IIES)
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Malaysia
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Push-Out
Notch Connections
Failure
Strength
Stiffness
Ultimate Limit States
Serviceability Limit States
Language
English
Conference
IIES 2014
Research Status
Complete
Notes
December 1-4, 2014, Johor, Malaysia
Summary
The LVL-concrete composite (LCC) structure is a hybrid in system which the LVL member is well connected to the concrete slab by a connector to produce composite action. Various types of connector with different stiffness and shear capacity are available in the market currently. The stiffness of the connector is identified through the push-out experiment. The notch connections for LVL concrete composite beams have higher stiffness and strength compared to mechanical fasteners. This paper discusses the experimental results of symmetrical push-out tests on 3 different types of connector, 150mm rectangular notch with 10mm diameter screw, 100mm rectangular notch with 8mm diameter screw and 100mm triangular notch with 8mm diameter screw. The experimental test was shear push out to failure and the type of failure was discussed. The 150mm rectangular notch was found to be strongest among all and low cost. The 100mm rectangular notch was found to be slightly stiffer than 100mm triangular notch but 100mm triangular notch is easier to construct with only 2 cut. The maximum strength and stiffness at ultimate limit states and serviceability limit states of each type of connection were discussed in this paper.
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Coupled Shear-Tension Numerical Model for Modelling of CLT Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1686
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Talledo, Diego
Pozza, Luca
Saetta, Anna
Savoia, Marco
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Numerical Model
Hold-Down
Strength
Stiffness
Tension
Shear
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4201-4209
Summary
A new numerical model able to account for the interaction between tension and shear forces on typical hold-down connections used in CLT structures is proposed and discussed, starting from results of an experimental campaign conducted at University of Bologna. A specifically developed method appropriate to evaluate the main strength and stiffness parameters from the experimental cyclic force-displacement curves is presented, and the corresponding trilinear backbone approximation is defined. Parameters obtained from tri-linear backbone curves were used to define the effect of the tension-shear interaction on the behaviour of hold-down connections, particularly as far as yielding and peak strength and stiffness parameters are concerned. In order to numerically reproduce the behaviour of connections, a coupled zero-length element is developed and presented. The model is implemented in OpenSees and adopted to model single connection element. The model is calibrated referring to experimental results of specimens loaded only in tension. Then the model is validated referring to tests with increasing level of tension-shear interaction. The proposed model is able to reproduce the actual behaviour of hold-down connection with coupled tension-shear forces under monotonic load conditions. Finally, a first proposal for accounting the hysteretic behaviour is presented, and some preliminary results are shown.
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Curved Cross Laminated Timber Elements

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1545
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Stecher, Georg
Maderebner, Roland
Zingerle, Philipp
Flach, Michael
Kraler, Anton
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Rolling Shear
Tensile Stress
Strength
Rigidity
Density
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1131-1138
Summary
In timber construction, curved timber components have been used repeatedly. Yet the use of curved CLT elements is a relatively recent phenomenon. To obtain a European Technical Approval (ETA) for so-called radius timber (single curved CLT elements), Holzbau Unterrainer GmbH commissioned the accredited testing institution TVFA – Innsbruck to carry out the tests required for this purpose. To this end, overall 158 tests were performed in building component dimensions from December 2013 to May 2014, and several laboratory tests were carried out to monitor adhesive joint quality. Due to the single curved shape of radius timber elements, it is key to particularly focus on possible implications on load bearing capacity due to pre-stress of the slats and to the tensile stress perpendicular to grain resulting from deflection forces. To comply with the criteria laid down in the semi-probabilistic safety concept used in Eurocode 5, the impact caused by these pre-curvatures on strength, rigidity and gross density must be known.
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Developing Seismic Performance Factors for Cross Laminated Timber in the United States

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue124
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
van de Lindt, John
Amini, M. Omar
Rammer, Douglas
Line, Philip
Pei, Shiling
Popovski, Marjan
Organization
Canadian Association for Earthquake Engineering
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Angle Bracket
Shear Test
Strength
Stiffness
Uplift Test
US
Language
English
Conference
The 11th Canadian Conference on Earthquake Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
July 21-24, 2015, Victoria, BC, Canada
Summary
This paper presents recent progress in the development of seismic performance factors for cross-laminated timber (CLT) systems in the United States. A brief overview of some of other systematic studies conducted in Europe, North America, and Japan is also provided. The FEMA P695 methodology is briefly described and selected results from connector testing and CLT wall testing are discussed. Shear and uplift tests were performed on generic angle brackets to quantify their behavior. CLT walls with these connectors were then tested investigate the influence of various parameters on wall component performance. The influential factors considered include boundary condition, gravity loading, CLT grade, panel thickness, and panel aspect ratio (height:length). Results indicate that boundary condition and gravity loading have beneficial effect on strength and stiffness of the CLT panels. CLT grade is an important parameter while CLT panel thickness only has a minimal influence on wall behavior. Higher aspect ratio (4:1) panels demonstrated less stiffness but considerably more ductility than the panels with lower aspect ratio (2:1). This paper also provides details on some ongoing efforts including additional tests planned, index buildings from which P-695 archetypes will be extracted, and nonlinear modeling for this project.
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Development of a Heavy Timber Moment-Resisting Frame with Ductile Steel Links

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1657
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Frames
Author
Gohlich, Ryan
Erochko, Jeffrey
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Frames
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Self-Tapping Screws
Moment-Resisting
Strength
Stiffness
Ductility
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 3571-3580
Summary
To improve the seismic performance of mid-rise heavy timber moment-resisting frames, a hybrid timbersteel moment-resisting connection was developed that incorporates specially detailed replaceable steel yielding link elements fastened to timber beams and columns using self-tapping screws (STS). Performance of the connection was verified using four 2/3 scale experimental tests. The connection reached a moment of 142 kN m at the column face while reaching a storey drift angle of 0.05 rad. Two specimens utilizing a dogbone detail in the steel link avoided fracture of the link, while two specimens absent of the dogbone detail underwent brittle failure at 0.05 rad drift. All four test specimens met the acceptance criteria in the AISC 341-10 provisions for steel moment frames. The STS connections exhibited high strength and stiffness, and all timber members and self-tapping screw connections remained elastic. The results of the experimental program indicated that this hybrid connection is capable of achieving a ductility factor similar to that of a steel-only moment-resisting connection. This research suggests that the use of high ductility factors in the design of timber systems that use the proposed hybrid connection would be appropriate, thus lowering seismic design base shears and increasing structure economy.
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Development of CLT Shear Frame Using Metal Plate Insert Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue697
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Kitamori, Akihisa
Nakashima, Shoichi
Isoda, Hiroshi
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Failure Mode
Joints
Steel Plate
Strength
Steel Connectors
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
The purpose of this study is to develop a high strength leg joint for shear wall made of small size cross laminated timber panel in a simple system. The joint of CLT in which steel plate was inserted in the central slit and fixed by high strength bolt at inside of short steel pipes was proposed. In order to grasp the failure mode and strength of CLT member, material tests on embedment and shear were carried out using small CLT blocks. The test results indicated that there is few reinforce effect by cross bonding of each lamina. It was concluded that the precise estimation of the strength of CLT member is important in order to develop the joint proposed in this paper.
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42 records – page 1 of 5.