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2092 records – page 1 of 210.

100-Year Performance of Timber-Concrete Composite Bridges in the United States

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2561
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Serviceability
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Bridges and Spans
Author
Wacker, James
Dias, Alfredo
Hosteng, Travis
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Serviceability
Keywords
Concrete
Composite
Superstructure
Performance
Inspection
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Bridge Engineering
Summary
The use of timber–concrete composite (TCC) bridges in the United States dates back to approximately 1924 when the first bridge was constructed. Since then a large number of bridges have been built, of which more than 1,400 remain in service. The oldest bridges still in service are now more than 84 years old and predominately consist of two different TCC systems. The first system is a slab-type system that includes a longitudinal nail-laminated deck composite with a concrete deck top layer. The second system is a stringer system that includes either sawn timber or glulam stringers supporting a concrete deck top layer. The records indicate that most of the TCC highway bridges were constructed during the period of 1930–1960. The study presented in this paper discusses the experience and per-formance of these bridge systems in the US. The analysis is based on a review of the relevant literature and databases complemented with field inspections conducted within various research projects. Along with this review, a historical overview of the codes and guidelines available for the design of TCC bridges in the US is also included. The analysis undertaken showed that TCC bridges are an effective and durable design alternative for highway bridges once they have shown a high performance level, in some situations after more than 80 years in service with a low maintenance level.
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The 200 m timber tower - A study on the possibilities of constructing a 200 meter tall timber building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3127
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Wind
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Gyllensten, Sebastian
Modig, Axel
Organization
Chalmers University of Technology
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Wind
Keywords
Aerodynamics
Tall Timber Structure
Wind Load
Acceleration
Research Status
Complete
Summary
As the interest in timber buildings is increasing, more attention is pointed towards highrise timber buildings. Partly because it is one of the main areas pushing the development within the field of timber structures. As the current tallest timber building, Mjöstornet in Brumunddal is approximately 10 times shorter than the world’s tallest building, Burj Khalifa, the intuition says that there is room for major improvements regarding tall timber structures. The aim of this thesis is therefore to investigate the possibilities to build a 200 m tall timber tower while still fulfilling the requirements for strength, stability and dynamics. In order to anchor the project in reality, the assumed building location is Gothenburg with the ground conditions of solid rock. Early in the study it was concluded that in order to push the height limits, the building design had to be improved compared to the existing timber buildings. The main geometries of interest turned out to be the circular shape thanks to its aerodynamical benefits. This base shape was applied in various ways, generating five different concepts ready for evaluation. Each of the five concepts were modelled and preliminary sized using Grasshopper and Karamba 3D, whereafter they were evaluated based on their dynamic performance, global stiffness, and a few other evaluation criteria. The evaluation was primary made with structural performance in mind and secondary with regard to comfort, quality and economical aspects. The results show that one of the concepts have great potential of reaching 200 m despite the uncertainties regarding joint stiffness and structural damping. Also, a few of the other concepts might be able to reach 200 m if subject to some structural and dynamical improvements.
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Ability of Finger-Jointed Lumber to Maintain Load at Elevated Temperatures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1832
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Material
Other Materials
Author
Rammer, Douglas
Zelinka, Samuel
Hasburgh, Laura
Craft, Steven
Publisher
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Journal Article
Material
Other Materials
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Small Scale
Full Scale
Bending Test
Melamine Formaldehyde
Phenol-Resorcinol Formaldehyde
Creep
Polyurethane
Polyvinyl Acetate
Temperature
Durability
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood and Fiber Science. 50(1): 44-54.
Summary
This article presents a test method that was developed to screen adhesive formulations for finger-jointed lumber. The goal was to develop a small-scale test that could be used to predict whether an adhesive would pass a full-scale ASTM E119 wall assembly test. The method involved loading a 38-mm square finger-jointed sample in a four-point bending test inside of an oven with a target sample temperature of 204°C. The deformation (creep) was examined as a function of time. It was found that samples fingerjointed with melamine formaldehyde and phenol resorcinol formaldehyde adhesives had the same creep behavior as solid wood. One-component polyurethane and polyvinyl acetate adhesives could not maintain the load at the target temperature measured middepth of the sample, and several different types of creep behavior were observed before failure. This method showed that the creep performance of the onecomponent adhesives may be quite different than the performance from short-term load deformation curves collected at high temperatures. The importance of creep performance of adhesives in the fire resistance of engineered wood is discussed.
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Accommodating Movement in High-Rise Wood-Frame Building Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1875
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Other Materials
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Walls
Author
Howe, Richard
Publisher
Forest Products Society
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Journal Article
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Other Materials
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Keywords
Detailing
Shrinkage
Differential Movement
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood Design Focus
Summary
Ease of construction and favorable overall costs relative to other construction types are making high-rise (i.e., 4- and 5-story) wood frame construction increasingly popular. With these buildings increasing in height, there is a greater impetus on designers to address frame and finishes movement in such construction. As we all know, buildings are dynamic creatures experiencing a variety of movements during construction and over their service life. In wood frame construction, it is important to consider not only absolute movement but also differential movement between dissimilar materials. This article focuses on differential movement issues and how to recognize their potential and avoid problems by effective detailing.
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Accommodating Shrinkage in Multi-Story Wood-Frame Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue712
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
McLain, Richard
Steimle, Doug
Organization
WoodWorks
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Keywords
Shrinkage
Mid-Rise
Multi-Story
Moisture Content
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In wood-frame buildings of three or more stories, cumulative shrinkage can be significant and have an impact on the function and performance of finishes, openings, mechanical/electrical/plumbing (MEP) systems, and structural connections. However, as more designers look to wood-frame construction to improve the cost and sustainability of their mid-rise projects, many have learned that accommodating wood shrinkage is actually very straightforward. This publication will describe procedures for estimating wood shrinkage and provide detailing options that minimize its effects on building performance.
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Accuracy Evaluation of Gamma-Method for Deflection Prediction of Partial Composite Beams

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1911
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Wood Building Systems
Beams
Author
Atashipour, Seyed
Landel, Pierre
Al-Emrani, Mohammad
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Wood Building Systems
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Shear Deformation
Exact Solution
Finite Element (FE) Model
Numerical Analysis
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 20-23, 2018, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Summary
In this paper a precise model is established for deflection prediction of mechanically jointed beams with partial composite action. High accuracy of the proposed method is demonstrated through comparison with a comprehensive finite element (FE) modelling for a timber-concrete partial composite beam. Next, the obtained numerical results are compared with gamma-method, a well-known simplified solution for timber engineers according to the Eurocode 5. Validity and accuracy level of the gamma-method are investigated for various boundary conditions as well as different values of beam length-to-depth ratio, and discussed in details.
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Accurate Strength Parameters for Fasteners with Examples for Ring Shank Nails

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1510
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Munch-Andersen, Jørgen
Svensson, Staffan
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Withdrawal Test
Ring Shank Nails
Fasteners
Strength
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 344-352
Summary
Strength parameters for fasteners determined in accordance with the methods prescribed for the European CE-marking leads to quite different values for seemingly similar products from different manufactures. The results are hardly repeatable, to some extent due to difficulties in selecting representative timber samples for the testing. Beside this uncertainty, the declared values available to the designer concerns only structural timber, so no strength parameters are available for common engineered wood products such as LVL or plywood. This paper gives: Examples of the variability of declared strength parameters for ring shank nails for almost similar products. Results from withdrawal test for similar nails inserted in the same timber specimens (structural timber and LVL), which is used for investigating similarities and differences between nails and wood. Discussion of statistical methods to compare the strength parameters of two nails. A proposal for a method that enables to determine accurate strength parameters needed for structural design from comparative tests involving reference fasteners.
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Acoustical Guide: Acoustic Research Report on Mass Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1839
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Floors
Organization
AcoustiTECH
Editor
Dompierre, David
Garant, Samuel
Publisher
AcoustiTECH
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Mass Timber
Sound Absorption
Impact Sound Insulation
Research Status
Complete
Summary
AcoustiTECH is a North American leader in acoustic solitions and has quickly become the reference standard in the industry. For 25 years, AcoustiTECH has teamed uo with Architects, builders, general contractors, acoustic consultants and other stakeholders to help them achieve their vision by providing proven acoustical solutions and expertise. AcoustiTECH looks at the specific requirements of each individual project, evaluates the requirements, determines the needs and provides personalized solutions. AcoustiTECH's approach is unique, efficient and reliable. We possess our own acoustic laboratory that we use for our research and development in order to recommend the best acoustic solutions by type of structure. Thousands of tests have been performed inclusing over 300 on heavy timber assemblies. The principal objective of creating this document is for the professionals to compare and choose from 25 assemblies the ones that suit their needs the best. The most interesting and popular assemblies have been selected and compared side by side in the same environment, built and tested by the same professional unisg the same flooring materials. It is important to note that the quality of construction can affect the performance. Indeed, construction standards and assemblies recommendations must be followed in order to reach the seeking performance.
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Acoustically-Tested Mass Timber Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2639
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Application
Floors
Walls

Acoustic Characteristics of Cross-Laminated Timber Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2618
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Di Bella, Antonino
Mitrovic, Milica
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Keywords
Wooden Building Technology
Building Acoustics
Noise Control
Flanking Transmission
Energy Efficiency
Sustainability
Research Status
Complete
Series
Sustainability
Summary
The growing diffusion of cross-laminated timber structures (CLT) has been accompanied by extensive research on the peculiar characteristics of this construction system, mainly concerning its economic and environmental benefits, lifecycle, structural design, resistance to seismic actions, fire protection, and energy efficiency. Nevertheless, some aspects have not yet been fully analysed. These include both the knowledge of noise protection that CLT systems are able to offer in relation to the possible applications and combinations of building elements, and the definition of calculation methods necessary to support the acoustic design. This review focuses on the main acoustic features of CLT systems and investigate on the results of the most relevant research aimed to provide key information on the application of acoustic modelling in CLT buildings. The vibro-acoustic behaviour of the basic component of this system and their interaction through the joints has been addressed, as well as the possible ways to manage acoustic information for calculation accuracy improvement by calibration with data from on-site measurements during the construction phase. This study further suggests the opportunity to improve measurement standards with specific reference curves for the bare CLT building elements, in order to compare different acoustic linings and assemblies on the same base. In addition, this study allows to identify some topics in the literature that are not yet fully clarified, providing some insights on possible future developments in research and for the optimization of these products.
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2092 records – page 1 of 210.