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10 records – page 1 of 1.

100-Year Performance of Timber-Concrete Composite Bridges in the United States

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2561
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Serviceability
Application
Bridges and Spans
Author
Wacker, James
Dias, Alfredo
Hosteng, Travis
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Serviceability
Keywords
Concrete
Composite
Superstructure
Performance
Inspection
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Bridge Engineering
Summary
The use of timber–concrete composite (TCC) bridges in the United States dates back to approximately 1924 when the first bridge was constructed. Since then a large number of bridges have been built, of which more than 1,400 remain in service. The oldest bridges still in service are now more than 84 years old and predominately consist of two different TCC systems. The first system is a slab-type system that includes a longitudinal nail-laminated deck composite with a concrete deck top layer. The second system is a stringer system that includes either sawn timber or glulam stringers supporting a concrete deck top layer. The records indicate that most of the TCC highway bridges were constructed during the period of 1930–1960. The study presented in this paper discusses the experience and per-formance of these bridge systems in the US. The analysis is based on a review of the relevant literature and databases complemented with field inspections conducted within various research projects. Along with this review, a historical overview of the codes and guidelines available for the design of TCC bridges in the US is also included. The analysis undertaken showed that TCC bridges are an effective and durable design alternative for highway bridges once they have shown a high performance level, in some situations after more than 80 years in service with a low maintenance level.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Accelerated Curing of Large Scale Glued-in-Rods

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2018
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)

Accommodating Movement in High-Rise Wood-Frame Building Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1875
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Other Materials
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Walls

Accuracy Evaluation of Gamma-Method for Deflection Prediction of Partial Composite Beams

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1911
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Wood Building Systems
Beams

Accurate Strength Parameters for Fasteners with Examples for Ring Shank Nails

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1510
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Munch-Andersen, Jørgen
Svensson, Staffan
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Withdrawal Test
Ring Shank Nails
Fasteners
Strength
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 344-352
Summary
Strength parameters for fasteners determined in accordance with the methods prescribed for the European CE-marking leads to quite different values for seemingly similar products from different manufactures. The results are hardly repeatable, to some extent due to difficulties in selecting representative timber samples for the testing. Beside this uncertainty, the declared values available to the designer concerns only structural timber, so no strength parameters are available for common engineered wood products such as LVL or plywood
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Achieving Sustainable Urban Buildings with Seismically Resilient Mass Timber Core Wall and Floor System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2802
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Cores
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Portland State University
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Cores
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Hold-Down
Seismic Performance
Core Walls
Parametric Analysis
Deformation Capacity
Overstrength
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
Tall Wood Buildings
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Peter Dusicka at Portland State University
Summary
The urgency in increasing growth in densely populated urban areas, reducing the carbon footprint of new buildings, and targeting rapid return to occupancy following disastrous earthquakes has created a need to reexamine the structural systems of mid- to high-rise buildings. To address these sustainability and seismic resiliency needs, the objective of this research is to enable an all-timber material system in a way that will include architectural as well as structural considerations. Utilization of mass timber is societally important in providing buildings that store, instead of generate, carbon and increase the economic opportunity for depressed timber-producing regions of the country. This research will focus on buildings with core walls because those building types are some of the most common for contemporary urban mid- to high-rise construction. The open floor layout will allow for commercial and mixed-use occupancies, but also will contain significant technical knowledge gaps hindering their implementation with mass timber. The research plan has been formulated to fill these gaps by: (1) developing suitable mid- to high-rise archetypes with input from multiple stakeholders, (2) conducting parametric system-level seismic performance investigations, (3) developing new critical components, (4) validating the performance with large-scale experimentation, and (5) bridging the industry information gaps by incorporating teaching modules within an existing educational and outreach framework. Situated in the heart of a timber-producing region, the multi-disciplinary team will utilize the local design professional community with timber experience and Portland State University's recently implemented Green Building Scholars program to deliver technical outcomes that directly impact the surrounding environment. Research outcomes will advance knowledge at the system performance level as well as at the critical component level. The investigated building system will incorporate cross laminated timber cores, floors, and glulam structural members. Using mass timber will present challenges in effectively achieving the goal of desirable seismic performance, especially seismic resiliency. These challenges will be addressed at the system level by a unique combination of core rocking combined with beam and floor interaction to achieve non-linear elastic behavior. This system behavior will eliminate the need for post-tensioning to achieve re-centering, but will introduce new parameters that can directly influence the lateral behavior. This research will study the effects of these parameters on the overall building behavior and will develop a methodology in which designers could use these parameters to strategically control the building seismic response. These key parameters will be investigated using parametric numerical analyses as well as large-scale, sub-system experimentation. One of the critical components of the system will be the hold-down, a device that connects the timber core to the foundation and provides hysteretic energy dissipation. Strength requirements and deformation demands in mid- to high-rise buildings, along with integration with mass timber, will necessitate the advancement of knowledge in developing this low-damage component. The investigated hold-down will have large deformation capability with readily replaceable parts. Moreover, the hold-down will have the potential to reduce strength of the component in a controlled and repeatable way at large deformations, while maintaining original strength at low deformations. This component characteristic can reduce the overall system overstrength, which in turn will have beneficial economic implications. Reducing the carbon footprint of new construction, linking rural and urban economies, and increasing the longevity of buildings in seismic zones are all goals that this mass timber research will advance and will be critical to the sustainable development of cities moving forward.
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Acoustical Guide: Acoustic Research Report on Mass Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1839
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Floors

Acoustically-Tested Mass Timber Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2639
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Application
Floors
Walls

Acoustical Performance of Mass Timber Building Elements

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2553
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Sound Insulation
Acoustic Membrane
Acoustical Performance
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Jianhui Zhou at the University of Northern British Columbia
Summary
Building acoustics has been identified as one of the key subjects for the success of mass timber in the multi-storey building markets. The project will investigate the acoustical performance of mass timber panels produced in British Columbia. The apparent sound transmission class (ASTC) and impact insulation class (AIIC) of bare mass timber elements as wall and/ or floor elements will be measured through a lab mock-up. It is expected that a database of the sound insulation performance of British Columbia mass timber products will be developed with guidance on optimal acoustical treatments to achieve different levels of performance.
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Acoustic Characteristics of Cross-Laminated Timber Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2618
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Di Bella, Antonino
Mitrovic, Milica
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Keywords
Wooden Building Technology
Building Acoustics
Noise Control
Flanking Transmission
Energy Efficiency
Sustainability
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Sustainability
Summary
The growing diffusion of cross-laminated timber structures (CLT) has been accompanied by extensive research on the peculiar characteristics of this construction system, mainly concerning its economic and environmental benefits, lifecycle, structural design, resistance to seismic actions, fire protection, and energy efficiency. Nevertheless, some aspects have not yet been fully analysed. These include both the knowledge of noise protection that CLT systems are able to offer in relation to the possible applications and combinations of building elements, and the definition of calculation methods necessary to support the acoustic design. This review focuses on the main acoustic features of CLT systems and investigate on the results of the most relevant research aimed to provide key information on the application of acoustic modelling in CLT buildings. The vibro-acoustic behaviour of the basic component of this system and their interaction through the joints has been addressed, as well as the possible ways to manage acoustic information for calculation accuracy improvement by calibration with data from on-site measurements during the construction phase. This study further suggests the opportunity to improve measurement standards with specific reference curves for the bare CLT building elements, in order to compare different acoustic linings and assemblies on the same base. In addition, this study allows to identify some topics in the literature that are not yet fully clarified, providing some insights on possible future developments in research and for the optimization of these products.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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10 records – page 1 of 1.