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10 records – page 1 of 1.

A Comparative Cradle-To-Gate Life Cycle Assessment of Mid-Rise Office Building Construction Alternatives: Laminated Timber or Reinforced Concrete

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue52
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Energy Performance
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Author
Robertson, Adam
Lam, Frank
Cole, Raymond
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Topic
Energy Performance
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Concrete
Embodied Carbon
Life-Cycle Assessment
Mid-Rise
National Building Code of Canada
NBCC
North America
Office Buildings
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
ISSN
2075-5309
Summary
The objective of this project was to quantify and compare the environmental impacts associated with alternative designs for a typical North American mid-rise office building. Two scenarios were considered; a traditional cast-in-place, reinforced concrete frame and a laminated timber hybrid design, which utilized engineered wood products (cross-laminated timber (CLT) and glulam). The boundary of the quantitative analysis was cradle-to-construction site gate and encompassed the structural support system and the building enclosure. Floor plans, elevations, material quantities, and structural loads associated with a five-storey concrete-framed building design were obtained from issued-for-construction drawings. A functionally equivalent, laminated timber hybrid design was conceived, based on Canadian Building Code requirements. Design values for locally produced CLT panels were established from in-house material testing. Primary data collected from a pilot-scale manufacturing facility was used to develop the life cycle inventory for CLT, whereas secondary sources were referenced for other construction materials. The TRACI characterization methodology was employed to translate inventory flows into impact indicators. The results indicated that the laminated timber building design offered a lower environmental impact in 10 of 11 assessment categories. The cradle-to-gate process energy was found to be nearly identical in both design scenarios (3.5 GJ/m2), whereas the cumulative embodied energy (feedstock plus process) of construction materials was estimated to be 8.2 and 4.6 GJ/m2 for the timber and concrete designs, respectively; which indicated an increased availability of readily accessible potential energy stored within the building materials of the timber alternative.
Online Access
Free
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Comparison of Carbon Footprints: Mass Timber Buildings vs Steels – A Literature Review

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2380
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Cooney, Emily
Publisher
Lakehead University
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Sustainability
Carbon Footprint
Mass Timber
Steel
Greenhouse Gases
Climate Change
Engineered Wood Product (EWP)
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Sustainability and innovation are key components in the fight against climate change. Mass timber buildings have been gaining popularity due to the renewable nature of timber. Although research comparing mass timber buildings to more mainstream buildings such as steel is still in the early stages and therefore, limited. We are looking to determine the difference between carbon footprints of mass timber and traditional steel and concrete buildings. This is done with the intention of determining the sustainability and practicality of mass timber buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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A Cradle-to-Cradle Approach to Timber Post and Beam Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1481
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Environmental Impact
Design and Systems
Connections
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Development of Adhesive Free Engineered Wood Products - Towards Adhesive Free Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2029
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Environmental Impact
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application

Environmental Performances of a Timber-Concrete Prefabricated Composite Wall System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1343
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Walls

Forest Management, Market and Climate Impacts of Mass Timber Materials

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2341
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
The Nature Conservancy
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
LCA
Life Cycle Analysis
Forest Management
Climate Impacts
Research Status
In Progress
Summary
The Nature Conservancy is leading a multi-institution collaboration to quantify the potential for innovative mass timber materials to support improved forest management, revitalize forest economies and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Life cycle assessments (LCAs) of engineered timber products such as glued laminated timber (glulam) and cross-laminated timber (CLT) in construction have highlighted their environmental advantages over conventional materials such as concrete and steel. However, there is little understanding of how developing new markets for such materials could support the wood product sector and the management of US forests. This applied research will assess in detail the potential impacts of large-scale growth in mass timber demand on wood product markets, timber harvest, forest management and climate change mitigation in key wood-producing regions across the USA and globally, as well as opportunities to leverage these markets to support US forest management and rural economies. The findings will be used to produce peer-reviewed publications and design a suite of targeted stakeholder engagement materials and programs, providing an objective, credible fact base to inform the design of policies and programs to maximize environmental and economic benefits of mass timber use for the forest sector.
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Gate-to-Gate Life-Cycle Inventory of Glued-Laminated Timbers Production

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1469
Year of Publication
2005
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Author
Puettmann, Maureen
Wilson, James
Publisher
Society of Wood Science and Technology
Year of Publication
2005
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Life-Cycle Inventory
Gate-to-Gate
US
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood and Fiber Science
Summary
As part of the CORRIM Phase I research, this study completed a full gate-to-gate life-cycle inventory for the production of glued-laminated timbers (glulam) produced in two regions of the United States—the Pacific Northwest (PNW) and Southeast (SE)...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Investigation Concerning Life Cycle Assessment of Worked Timber: Japanese Larch Glued Laminated Timber of Eastern Nagano Prefecture

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue961
Year of Publication
June 2014
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Author
Matsukata, Keisuke
Asano, Yoshiharu
Takamura, Hideki
Hayakawa, Yoshiro
Publisher
J-STAGE
Year of Publication
June 2014
Country of Publication
Japan
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Life-Cycle Assessment
Larch
Carbon
Finger joint
Language
Japanese
Research Status
Complete
Series
Japan Architectural Institute Technical Report
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Life Cycle Assessment of a Post-Tensioned Timber Frame in Comparison to a Reinforced Concrete Frame for Tall Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue412
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Author
Cattarinussi, Laurent
Hofstetter, Kathrin
Ryffel, Rinaldo
Zumstein, K.
Ioannidou, Dimitra
Klippel, Michael
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Concrete
Sustainability
Life-Cycle Assessment
Post-Tensioned
Greenhouse Gases
Costs
Construction Time
Language
English
Conference
SBE Regional Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
June 15-17, 2016, Zurich, Switzerland
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Zero-Waste Mass-Timber Residential High-Rise: A Sustainable High-density Housing Solution

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2381
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Design and Systems
Material
Timber (unspecified)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
van Houten, Robert
Publisher
Delft University of Technology
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Thesis
Material
Timber (unspecified)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Design and Systems
Keywords
Mass Timber
Residential
High-Rise
End of Life
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
More and more people live in cities. The building industry is responsible for 33% of waste production and is set to increase further to 50% in 2025. The energy efficiency is continuously increased, but the waste production at the end of life of a building is largely ignored. This design proposes a solution in the form of a zero-waste high-rise design. It uses only recyclable or renewable materials. Mass-timber is chosen as the main material as it is not only renewable and easily reusable, it is also a storage of CO2. The design reuses the foundation of existing buildings, and with the lightweight properties of mass-timber, increases the density on the location by building taller. The design is four times taller as the current buildings. To allow for sustainable densification, the design offers public and collective qualities. The building has been designed is such a way to be easily refitted during its life cycle or to be completely disassembled at the end of life.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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10 records – page 1 of 1.