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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Carbon Value Engineering: Integrated Carbon and Cost Reduction Strategies for Building Design

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2268
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Environmental Impact
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Beams
Author
Robati, Mehdi
Oldfield, Philip F.
Nezhad, Ali Akbar
Carmichael, David
Organization
UNSW Sydney
Multiplex Australasia
Publisher
Cooperative Research for Low Carbon Living
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Australia
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Beams
Topic
Environmental Impact
Cost
Keywords
Value Engineering
Embodied Carbon
Hybrid Life Cycle Assessment
Capital Cost
Environmentally-extended Input-Output Analysis
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The research presents a Carbon Value Engineering framework. This is a quantitative value analysis method, which not only estimates cost but also considers the carbon impact of alternative design solutions. It is primarily concerned with reducing cost and carbon impacts of developed design projects; that is, projects where the design is already a completed to a stage where a Bill of Quantity (BoQ) is available, material quantities are known, and technical understanding of the building is developed. This research demonstrates that adopting this integrated carbon and cost method was able to reduce embodied carbon emissions by 63-267 kgCO2-e/m2 (8-36%) when maintaining a concrete frame, and 72-427 kgCO2-e/m2 (10-57%) when switching to a more novel whole timber frame. With a GFA of 43,229 m2 these savings equate to an overall reduction of embodied carbon in the order of 2,723 – 18,459 tonnes of CO2-e. Costs savings for both alternatives were in the order of $127/m2 which equates to a 10% reduction in capital cost. For comparison purposes the case study was also tested with a high-performance façade. This reduced lifecycle carbon emissions in the order of 255 kgCO2-e/m2, over 50 years, but at an additional capital cost, due to the extra materials. What this means is strategies to reduce embodied carbon even late in the design stage can provide carbon savings comparable, and even greater than, more traditional strategies to reduce operational emissions over a building’s effective life.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Cost, Time and Environmental Impacts of the Construction of the New NMIT Arts and Media Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue251
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
John, Stephen
Mulligan, Kerry
Perez, Nicolas
Love, Simon
Page, Ian
Organization
University of Canterbury
Year of Publication
2011
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Report
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Keywords
Life Cycle Cost Study
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report was produced by the University of Canterbury for the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry under Expression of Interest MAF POL 0910-11665. The report covers extensive research carried out on the construction of the new Arts and Media building at Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology in Nelson, New Zealand, between March 2010 and June 2011. The collaborative research programme was directed by the Department of Civil and Natural Resources Engineering at the University of Canterbury (UC), Christchurch. Major contributions to the research programme were made by third-party industry consultants and reported in separate documents – a copy of all the original reports is included in the Appendices ; ScionResearch - Carbon and Energy Footprint of a new three storey building at Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology (NMIT), Simon Love (2011); BRANZ (Building Research Association of New Zealand) - Nelson-Marlborough Institute of Technology Arts Building – An assessement of life cycle costs for alternative designs (BRANZ report E568), Ian Page (2010); Aurecon Group and ISJ Architects (working together) – NMIT Alternative Structural Design; Ref. 210688-001 (August, 2010).
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Encapsulated Mass Timber Construction - Cost Comparison Canada: Construction, Time & Maintenance Cost-Benefit Report

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2359
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Floors
Organization
Hanscomb
Publisher
National Research Council Canada
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Floors
Topic
Cost
Keywords
Encapsulated Mass Timber Construction
Building Code
Time
Construction Time
Construction Cost
Maintenance Cost
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The Task Group on Combustible Construction is in the process of evaluating a proposed code change request related to buildings of encapsulated mass timber construction (EMTC). As part of the analysis of the code change request, an impact analysis is required that includes a cost-benefit analysis. Hanscomb was hired to provide a cost-benefit analysis and to compare the estimated value of the following: 1. The cost of constructing a building of mass timber (unprotected) versus a building constructed of encapsulated mass timber (e.g. mass timber protected with a double layer of Type X gypsum board) versus a traditional concrete and steel building. 2. The time to build a building of mass timber construction (unprotected) versus a building of encapsulated mass timber construction versus a traditional concrete and steel building. 3. The annual maintenance costs of building of mass timber construction versus a building of encapsulated mass timber construction versus a traditional concrete and steel building. For the purposes of this study two sets of conceptual floor plans and elevations have been created: 1. A 12 storey building with a Group C major occupancy (residential) where each storey is 6,000 m2 in floor area. 2. A 12 storey building with a Group D major occupancy (office) where each storey is 7,200 m2 in floor area.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Final Report for Commercial Building Costing Cases Studies – Traditional Design Versus Timber Project

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue271
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Increasing Deemed to Satisfy Height Limits for Timber Construction Cost Benefit Analysis

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1929
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Cost
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
The Centre for International Economics
Publisher
Forest & Wood Products Australia
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Australia
Format
Report
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Cost
Keywords
NCC
Mid-Rise
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
ISBN
978-1-925213-11-9
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Innovative Engineered Timber Building Systems for Non-Residential Applications, Utilising Timber Concrete Composite Flooring Capable of Spanning Up to 8 to 10m

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1933
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Market and Adoption
Design and Systems
Cost
Environmental Impact
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Frames

Literature Review of Cost Information on Mid-Rise Mass-Timber Building Projects

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2533
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Cost
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Sorathiya, Rashmin
Organization
UBC Sustainability Initiative
City of Vancouver
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Cost
Keywords
Cost comparison
Quantitative Analysis
Qualitative Analysis
Concrete
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Traditionally, mid-rise buildings, typically 6-12 stories in height, have used concrete and steel as structural materials. Recent advancements in engineered wood products, as well as increased concerns for environmental impacts, such as carbon emissions, are driving interest in utilizing mass timber as the primary structural system for mid-rise buildings, particularly residential projects in British Columbia. Demonstration projects like UBC Brock Commons Tallwood Building have showcased the feasibility and opportunities of mass timber structural systems, and anticipated changes to the national and provincial building codes could facilitate the development of mass timber buildings up to twelve stories in the near future. The City of Vancouver is the regulating body for the building construction in Vancouver and as such, is developing policies that could incorporate considerations for building mid-rise mass timber buildings. While there has been a significant amount of well-documented research on the characteristics and performance of mass timber products and structural systems, there has been less on the cost implications and affordability factors of mass timber buildings above six stories. Cost is a major driver and constraint for decisions at every stage of building projects, from planning through operations, and the lack of information is an area of uncertainty in the widespread adoption of mass timber as a primary building construction material. This study, Literature review of cost information on mid-rise, mass-timber building projects, was initiated by the City of Vancouver’s Sustainability Department, and was undertaken in the summer of 2019 by the University of British Columbia’s Sustainability Initiative. The study aims to develop an understanding of various cost indicators and the data available in the literature to identify evidential support for the benefits of mass timber construction. The results may inform the City of Vancouver on the current trends, knowledge gaps and future research identified in the literature, and serve as a starting point in collecting cost relevant information for policy and regulations.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Manufacturing Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT): Technological and Economic Analysis

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2636
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Julien, F.
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2010
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Keywords
Manufacturing
Economic Analysis
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Potential for Tall Wood Buildings to Sequester Carbon, Support Forest Communities, and Create New Options for Forest Management

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue724
Topic
Environmental Impact
Market and Adoption
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bergman, Richard
Kelley, Stephen
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Market and Adoption
Cost
Keywords
Life Cycle Analysis
Carbon Sequestration
Financial Analysis
Life Cycle Costs
Economic Impact
Research Status
In Progress
Summary
The primary outcome of this work is to provide integrated analysis of the environmental, financial, and social benefits and costs of using CLT in tall wood buildings. Secondary outcomes will be (1) information, including a design team checkoff that can be used to inform the building community as they make decisions on specific, new building projects, and (2) an informational foundation for these stakeholders and others to begin to evaluate the complex tradeoffs between, and optimization of, environmental, financial, and social benefits and costs.
Resource Link
Less detail

Solid Timber Construction: Process, Practice, Performance

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue974
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Market and Adoption
Cost
Design and Systems
Site Construction Management
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

10 records – page 1 of 1.