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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Advanced Methods of Encapsulation

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue41
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Roy-Poirier, Audrey
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Codes
Encapsulation
Type X Gypsum Board
National Building Code of Canada
Tall Wood
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project aims to support the construction of tall wood buildings by identifying encapsulation methods that provide adequate protection of mass timber elements; the intention is that these methods could potentially be applied to mass timber elements so that the overall assembly could achive a 2 h fire resistance rating.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Advanced Wood-Based Solutions for Mid-Rise and High-Rise Construction: Exit Fire Separations in Mid-Rise Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1879
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shafts and Chases
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shafts and Chases
Topic
Fire
Keywords
National Building Code of Canada
Combustible Material
Mid-Rise
Noncombustible Construction
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
FPInnovations initiated this project to demonstrate the ability of wood exit stairs in mid-rise buildings to perform adequately in a fire when NBCC requirements are followed, with the intent of changing perceptions of the fire safety of wood construction. The objective of this research is to investigate further the fire safety afforded by exit stair shafts of combustible construction, with the ultimate objective of better consistency between the provincial and national building codes with respect to fire requirements for exit stair shafts in mid-rise wood-frame construction.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Advanced Wood-Based Solutions for Mid-Rise and High-Rise Construction: Mid-Rise Wood Exit Shaft Demonstration Fire Test Report

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1176
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Application
Shafts and Chases
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Bénichou, Noureddine
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Application
Shafts and Chases
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Residential
Multi-Family
Exit Shafts
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
FPInnovations conducted a research project to study the construction of mid-rise wood exit shafts in Ontario and Québec. The scope of the project included an investigation into the concerns that have been raised in regards to the use of wood exits in mid-rise buildings, an analysis of recent Canadian fire statistics in residential multi-family structures, and a fire demonstration of a mass timber wall and supported light-frame floor. This report describes the fire demonstration completed as part of this project; this report acts as a supplement to the full project report.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

An Overview on Retrofit for Improving Building Energy Efficiency

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue365
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Energy Performance
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Wang, Jieying
Ranger, Lindsay
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Energy Performance
Keywords
Concrete
Energy Consumption
Envelope
Retrofit
Single Family Houses
Steel
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This literature review aims to provide a general picture of retrofit needs, markets, and commonly used strategies and measures to reduce building energy consumption, and is primarily focused on energy retrofit of the building envelope. Improving airtightness and thermal performance are the two key aspects for improving energy performance of the building envelope and subsequently reducing the energy required for space heating or cooling. This report focuses on the retrofit of single family houses and wood-frame buildings and covers potential use of wood-based systems in retrofitting the building envelope of concrete and steel buildings. Air sealing is typically the first step and also one of the most cost-effective measures to improving energy performance of the building envelope. Airtightness can be achieved through sealing gaps in the existing air barrier, such as polyethylene or drywall, depending on the air barrier approach; or often more effectively, through installing a new air barrier, such as an airtight exterior sheathing membrane or continuous exterior insulation during retrofit. Interface detailing is always important to achieve continuity and effectiveness of an air barrier. For an airtight building, mechanical ventilation is needed to ensure good indoor air quality and heat recovery ventilators are typically required for an energy efficient building. Improving thermal resistance of the building envelope is the other key strategy to improve building energy efficiency during retrofit. This can be achieved by: 1. blowing or injecting insulation into an existing wall or a roof; 2. building extra framing, for example, by creating double-stud exterior walls to accommodate more thermal insulation; or, 3. by installing continuous insulation, typically on the exterior. Adding exterior insulation is a major solution to improving thermal performance of the building envelope, particularly for large buildings. When highly insulated building envelope assemblies are built, more attention is required to ensure good moisture performance. An increased level of thermal insulation generally increases moisture risk due to increased vapour condensation potential but reduced drying ability. Adding exterior insulation can make exterior structural components warmer and consequently reduce vapour condensation risk in a heating climate. However, the vapour permeance of exterior insulation may also affect the drying ability and should be taken into account in design. Overall energy retrofit remains a tremendous potential market since the majority of existing buildings were built prior to implementation of any energy requirement and have large room available for improving energy performance. However, significant barriers exist, mostly associated with retrofit cost. Improving energy performance of the building envelope typically has a long payback time depending on the building, climate, target performance, and measures taken. Use of wood-based products during energy retrofit also needs to be further identified and developed.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Assess Fire Spread in Floor Voids

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue796
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Floors
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Floors
Topic
Fire
Keywords
National Building Code of Canada
Flame Spread
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Some innovative and structurally efficient uses of massive wood panels, such as cross-laminated timber (CLT), will result in hollow structural sections. Light-weight wood construction as well as heavy timber assemblies using dropped ceilings or raised fl...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Encapsulation of Mass Timber Floor Surfaces

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2528
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors

Evaluating Fire Performance of Nail-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2092
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Fire
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Bénichou, Noureddine
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Fire Resistance
NBCC
Fire Safety
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The objective of this work is to generate fire resistance data for NLT assemblies to address significant gaps in technical knowledge. This research will support designers and builders in the use of mass timber assemblies in larger and taller buildings, as well as provide scientific justification for Authorities Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) to review and accept this construction method. The intent is to demonstrate that NLT construction can meet or exceed NBCC fire safety requirements for use in buildings of mass timber construction. The data could be used towards the inclusion of an NLT fire resistance calculation methodology into Annex B of CSA 086 - Engineering Design for Wood, which currently addresses only glue-laminated timber (GLT), structural composite lumber (SCL) and cross-laminated timber (CLT).
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Evaluating Fire Performance of Nail-Laminated Timber: Influence of Gaps

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2093
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Fire
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Charring
Gaps
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The objective of this work is to generate fire performance data for NLT assemblies to address gaps in technical knowledge. This project aims to study how the size of gaps between NLT boards might affect charring of an assembly and its overall fire performance. This research will support designers and builders in the use of mass timber assemblies in larger and taller buildings, by ensuring fire safe designs.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Evaluating Fire Performance of Nail-Laminated Timber: Surface Flammability

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2094
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Fire
Design and Systems
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Design and Systems
Keywords
Flame Spread
Fire Safety
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The objective of this project is to establish fundamental fire performance data for the design and specification of NLT assemblies; this project specially addresses determining FSRs for NLT. The goal of this project is to confirm that NLT, when used as a mass timber element, has a lower FSR than standard thickness SPF boards when tested individually and flatwise. The project also considers how the surface profiles, design details, and the direction of an assembly might influence flame spread. This includes the evaluation of typical architectural features, such as a 'fluted' profile.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Fire Resistance of Long Span Composite Wood Concrete Floor Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue17
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Long Span
Testing
Full Scale
shear connectors
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
There is a need to evaluate timber-concrete composite (TCC) systems under fire conditions to understand how shear connectors will perform and might affect the fire performance and the composite action of the assmebly. This project evaluates the fire performance of TCC assemblies based on their structural resistance, integrity and insulation when exposed to a standard fire, as well as how mass timber and concrete interact. This study involves full-scale fire resistance tests on wood-concrete composite floors using two types of shear connectors.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.