Skip header and navigation

8 records – page 1 of 1.

Expanding Wood Use Towards 2025: Seismic Performance of Braced Mass Timber Frames, Year 2

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2597
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Chen, Zhiyong
Popovski, Marjan
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Seismic Performance
Connections
Connection Systems
Multi-Story
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Braced timber frames (BTFs) are one of the most efficient structural systems to resist lateral loads induced by earthquakes or high winds. Although BTFs are implemented as a system in the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC), no design guidelines currently exist in CSA O86. That not only leaves these efficient systems out of reach of designers, but also puts them in danger of being eliminated from NBCC. The main objective of this project is to generate the technical information needed for development of design guidelines for BTFs as a lateral load resisting system in CSA O86. The seismic performance of 30 BTFs with riveted connections was studied last year by conducting nonlinear dynamic analysis; and also 15 glulam brace specimens using bolted connections were tested under cyclic loading. In the second year of the project, a relationship between the connection and system ductility of BTFs was derived based on engineering principles. The proposed relationship was verified against the nonlinear pushover analysis results of single- and multi-storey BTFs with various building heights. The influence of the connection ductility, the stiffness ratio, and the number of tiers and storeys on the system ductility of BTFs was investigated using the verified relationship. The minimum connection ductility for different categories (moderately ductile and limited ductility) of BTFs was estimated.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Force Based Design Guideline for Timber-Steel Hybrid Structures: Steel Moment Resisting Frames with CLT Infill Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue83
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Tesfamariam, Solomon
Stiemer, Siegfried
Bezabeh, Matiyas
Goertz, Caleb
Popovski, Marjan
Goda, Katsuichiro
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Overstrength
Ductility
National Building Code of Canada
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Office Buildings
Residential Buildings
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Provincial code changes have been made to allow construction of light wood-frame buildings up to 6 storeys in order to satisfy the urban housing demand in western Canadian cities. It started in 2009 when the BC Building Code was amended to increase the height limit for wood-frame structures from four to six. Recently, provinces of Quebec, Ontario and Alberta followed suit. While wood-frame construction is limited to six storeys, some innovative wood-hybrid systems can go to greater heights. In this report, a feasibility study of timber-based hybrid buildings is described as carried out by The University of British Columbia (UBC) in collaboration with FPInnovations. This project, funded through BC Forestry Innovation Investment's (FII) Wood First Program, had an objective to develop design guidelines for a new steel-timber hybrid structural system that can be used as part of the next generation "steel-timber hybrid structures" that is limited in scope to 20 storey office or residential buildings. ...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Force Modification Factors for Cross Laminated Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue363
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Seismic
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Pei, Shiling
Popovski, Marjan
van de Lindt, John
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Performance-Based Seismic Design
Canada
US
Force Modification Factors
Mid-Rise
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
European experience shows that Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) can be competitive in mid-rise and high-rise buildings. Although this system has not been used to the same extent so far in North America, it can be viable wood structural solution for the shift towards sustainable densification of urban and suburban centers. For these reasons FPInnovations has undertaken a multi-disciplinary project on determining the performance of a typical CLT construction, including quantifying the seismic resistance and force modification factors for CLT buildings in Canada and the US. In this report, a performance-based seismic design (PBSD) of a CLT building was conducted and the seismic response of the CLT building was compared to that of a wood-frame structure tested during the NEESWood project. A suitable force modification factors (R-factors) for CLT mid-rise buildings with different fasteners were recommended for seismic design in Canada and the US. The six-storey NEESWood Capstone building was redesigned as a CLT building using the PBSD procedure developed during the NEESWood project. The results from the quasi-static tests on CLT walls performed at FPInnovations were used as input information for modeling of the main load resisting elements of the structure, the CLT walls. Once the satisfactory design of the CLT mid-rise structure was established through PBSD, a force-based design was developed with varying R-factors and that design was compared to the PBSD result. In this way, suitable R-factors were calibrated so that they can yield equivalent seismic performance of the CLT building when designed using the traditional force-based design methods. Based on the results of this study it is recommended that a value of Rd=2.5 and Ro=1.5 can be assigned for structures with symmetrical floor plans according to NBCC. In the US an R=4.5 can be used for symmetrical CLT structures designed according to ASCE7. These values can be assigned provided that the design values for CLT walls considered (and implemented in the material design standards) are similar to the values determined in this study using the kinematics model developed that includes the influence of the hold-downs in the CLT wall resistance. Design of the CLT building with those R-factors using the equivalent static procedures in the US and Canada will result in the CLT building having similar seismic performance to that of the tested wood-frame NEESWood building, which had only minor non-structural damage during a rare earthquake event.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Performance-Based Approach to Support Tall and Large Wood Buildings: Fire and Seismic Performance

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1982
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Seismic
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dagenais, Christian
Chen, Zhiyong
Popovski, Marjan
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Seismic
Keywords
Performance Based Design
National Building Code of Canada
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The objective of the current project is to develop a performance-based design process for wood-based design systems that would meet the objectives and functional statements set forth in the National Building Code of Canada. More specifically, this report discusses the fire and seismic performance of buildings, as identified as a priority in a previous FPInnovations report (Dagenais, C. (2016). Development of Performance Criteria for Wood-Based Building Systems).
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Performance of Two-Storey CLT House Subjected to Lateral Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue376
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Popovski, Marjan
Gavric, Igor
Schneider, Johannes
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Keywords
Lateral Loads
North America
Building Codes
Full Scale
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Loading
Cyclic Loading
Failure Mechanism
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The work presented in this report is a continuation of the FPInnovations' research project on determining the performance of the CLT as a structural system under lateral loads. A two storey full-scale model of a CLT house was tested under quasi-static monotonic and cyclic lateral loading in two directions, one direction at a time. In total five tests were performed; one push-over and two cyclic tests were conducted in the longer symmetrical direction (E-W), and two cyclic tests were performed in the shorter asymmetrical direction (N-S). In addition, before and after each test, natural frequencies of the house in both directions were measured. The main objective of the tests was to investigate 3-D system behaviour of the CLT structure subjected to lateral loads. The CLT structure subjected to lateral loads performed according to the design objectives.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Seismic Performance of 6-Storey Wood-Frame Buildings: Final Report

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2638
Year of Publication
2009
Topic
Seismic
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Ni, Chun
Popovski, Marjan
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2009
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Residential
Building Code
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
spIn this report, the seismic performance of 6-storey wood frame residential buildings is studied. Two building configurations, a typical wood-frame residential building and a building to be tested under the NEESWood project, were studied. For each building configuration, a four-storey building and a six-storey building were designed to the current (pre-April 6, 2009) 2006 BC Building Code (BCBC) and to the anticipated new requirements in the 2010 National Building Code of Canada (NBCC), resulting in four buildings with different designs. The four-storey building designed to the current 2006 BC Building Code served as the benchmark building representing the performance of current permissible structures with common architectural layouts. In the design of both four-storey and six-storey buildings, it was assumed that the buildings are located in Vancouver on a site with soil class C. Instead of using the code formula, the fundamental natural period of the buildings was determined based on the actual mass and stiffness of wood-based shearwalls. The base shear and inter-storey drift are determined in accordance with Clauses 4.1.8.11.(3)(d)(iii) and 4.1.8.11.(3)(d)(iv) of BCBC, respectively. Computer programs DRAIN 3-D and SAPWood were used to evaluate the seismic performance of the buildings. A series of 20 different earthquake records, 14 of the crustal type and 6 of the subcrustal type, were provided by the Earthquake Engineering Research Facility of the University of British Columbia and used in the evaluation. The records were chosen to fit the 2005 NBCC mean PSA and PSV spectra for the city of Vancouver. For representative buildings designed in accordance with 2006 BCBC, seismic performance with and without gypsum wall board (GWB) is studied. For representative buildings designed in accordance with the 2010 NBCC, the seismic performance with GWB is studied. For the NEESWood building redesigned in accordance with 2010 NBCC, seismic performance without GWB is studied. Ignoring the contribution of GWB would result in a conservative estimate of the seismic performance of the building. In the 2006 BCBC and 2010 NBCC, the inter-storey drift limit is set at 2.5 % of the storey height for the very rare earthquake event (1 in 2475 year return period). Limiting inter-storey drift is a key parameter for meeting the objective of life safety under a seismic event. For 4-storey and 6-storey representative wood-frame buildings where only wood-based shearwalls are considered, results from both DRAIN-3D and SAPWood show that none of the maximum inter-storey drifts at any storey under any individual earthquake exceed the 2.5% inter-storey drift limit given in the building code. With DRAIN-3D, the average maximum inter-storey drifts are approximately 1.2% and 1.5% for 4-storey and 6-storey buildings designed with 2006 BCBC, respectively. For the NEESWood wood-frame building, none of the maximum inter-storey drifts at any storey under any individual earthquake exceed the 2.5% inter-storey drift limit for 4-storey building obtained from SAPWood and 6-storey building obtained from DRAIN-3D and SAPWood. For any 4-storey building analysed with DRAIN-3D, approximately half of the earthquakes resulted in the maximum inter-storey drifts greater than 2.5% inter-storey limit. This is partly due to the assumptions used in Drain-3D model in which the lumped mass at each storey is equally distributed to all the nodes of the floor. As a result, the total weight to counteract the uplift force at the ends of a wall would be much smaller than that anticipated in the design, thus causing hold-downs to yield and large uplift deformations to occur. Based on the analyses of a representative building and a redesigned NEESWood building situated in the city of Vancouver that subjected the structures to 20 earthquake records, 6-storey wood-frame building is expected to show similar or smaller inter-storey drift than a 4-storey wood-frame building, which is currently deemed acceptable under the current building code. Building construction - Design Building construction - Specfications Earthquakes, Effect on building construction
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Solutions for Upper Mid-Rise and High-Rise Mass Timber Construction: Numerical Models for Post-Tensioned Shear Wall System with Energy Dissipators

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2601
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Chen, Zhiyong
Popovski, Marjan
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2019
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Pres-Lam
Seismic Design
Earthquake
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The latest developments in seismic design philosophy in modern urban centers have moved towards the development of new types of so called “resilient” or “low damage” structural systems. Such systems reduce the damage to the structure during an earthquake while offering the same or higher levels of safety to occupants. One such structural system in mass timber construction is the “Pres-Lam” system developed by Structural Timber Innovation Company (STIC) and Prestressed Timber Limited (PTL), both from New Zealand. FPInnovations has acquired the Intellectual Property rights for the Pres-Lam system for use in Canada and the United States.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Solutions for Upper Mid-Rise and High-Rise Mass Timber Construction: Seismic Performance of Braced Mass Timber Frames, Year 1

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2640
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Author
Chen, Zhiyong
Popovski, Marjan
Symons, Paul
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2019
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Lateral Load
Seismic Performance
Braced Frames
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Braced mass timber (MT) frames are one of the most efficient structural systems to resist lateral loads induced by earthquakes or high winds. Although braced frames are presented as a system in the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC), no design guidelines currently exist in CSA O86. That not only leaves these efficient systems out of reach of designers, but also puts them in danger of being eliminated from NBCC. The main objective of this project was to develop the technical information needed for development of design guidelines for braced MT frames as a lateral load resisting system in CSA O86. In the first year of the project, the seismic performance of thirty (30) braced MT frames with riveted connections with various numbers of storeys, storey heights, and bay aspect ratios were studied by conducting non-linear pushover and dynamic time-history analyses. Also, fifteen (15) glulam brace specimens using bolted connections with different slenderness ratios were tested under monotonic and cyclic loading. Results from this multi-year project will form the basis for developing comprehensive design guidelines for braced frames in CSA O86.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.