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Achieving Sustainable Urban Buildings with Seismically Resilient Mass Timber Core Wall and Floor System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2802
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Cores
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Portland State University
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Cores
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Hold-Down
Seismic Performance
Core Walls
Parametric Analysis
Deformation Capacity
Overstrength
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
Tall Wood Buildings
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Peter Dusicka at Portland State University
Summary
The urgency in increasing growth in densely populated urban areas, reducing the carbon footprint of new buildings, and targeting rapid return to occupancy following disastrous earthquakes has created a need to reexamine the structural systems of mid- to high-rise buildings. To address these sustainability and seismic resiliency needs, the objective of this research is to enable an all-timber material system in a way that will include architectural as well as structural considerations. Utilization of mass timber is societally important in providing buildings that store, instead of generate, carbon and increase the economic opportunity for depressed timber-producing regions of the country. This research will focus on buildings with core walls because those building types are some of the most common for contemporary urban mid- to high-rise construction. The open floor layout will allow for commercial and mixed-use occupancies, but also will contain significant technical knowledge gaps hindering their implementation with mass timber. The research plan has been formulated to fill these gaps by: (1) developing suitable mid- to high-rise archetypes with input from multiple stakeholders, (2) conducting parametric system-level seismic performance investigations, (3) developing new critical components, (4) validating the performance with large-scale experimentation, and (5) bridging the industry information gaps by incorporating teaching modules within an existing educational and outreach framework. Situated in the heart of a timber-producing region, the multi-disciplinary team will utilize the local design professional community with timber experience and Portland State University's recently implemented Green Building Scholars program to deliver technical outcomes that directly impact the surrounding environment. Research outcomes will advance knowledge at the system performance level as well as at the critical component level. The investigated building system will incorporate cross laminated timber cores, floors, and glulam structural members. Using mass timber will present challenges in effectively achieving the goal of desirable seismic performance, especially seismic resiliency. These challenges will be addressed at the system level by a unique combination of core rocking combined with beam and floor interaction to achieve non-linear elastic behavior. This system behavior will eliminate the need for post-tensioning to achieve re-centering, but will introduce new parameters that can directly influence the lateral behavior. This research will study the effects of these parameters on the overall building behavior and will develop a methodology in which designers could use these parameters to strategically control the building seismic response. These key parameters will be investigated using parametric numerical analyses as well as large-scale, sub-system experimentation. One of the critical components of the system will be the hold-down, a device that connects the timber core to the foundation and provides hysteretic energy dissipation. Strength requirements and deformation demands in mid- to high-rise buildings, along with integration with mass timber, will necessitate the advancement of knowledge in developing this low-damage component. The investigated hold-down will have large deformation capability with readily replaceable parts. Moreover, the hold-down will have the potential to reduce strength of the component in a controlled and repeatable way at large deformations, while maintaining original strength at low deformations. This component characteristic can reduce the overall system overstrength, which in turn will have beneficial economic implications. Reducing the carbon footprint of new construction, linking rural and urban economies, and increasing the longevity of buildings in seismic zones are all goals that this mass timber research will advance and will be critical to the sustainable development of cities moving forward.
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Coupled Shear-Tension Numerical Model for Modelling of CLT Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1686
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Talledo, Diego
Pozza, Luca
Saetta, Anna
Savoia, Marco
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Numerical Model
Hold-Down
Strength
Stiffness
Tension
Shear
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4201-4209
Summary
A new numerical model able to account for the interaction between tension and shear forces on typical hold-down connections used in CLT structures is proposed and discussed, starting from results of an experimental campaign conducted at University of Bologna. A specifically developed method appropriate to evaluate the main strength and stiffness parameters from the experimental cyclic force-displacement curves is presented, and the corresponding trilinear backbone approximation is defined. Parameters obtained from tri-linear backbone curves were used to define the effect of the tension-shear interaction on the behaviour of hold-down connections, particularly as far as yielding and peak strength and stiffness parameters are concerned. In order to numerically reproduce the behaviour of connections, a coupled zero-length element is developed and presented. The model is implemented in OpenSees and adopted to model single connection element. The model is calibrated referring to experimental results of specimens loaded only in tension. Then the model is validated referring to tests with increasing level of tension-shear interaction. The proposed model is able to reproduce the actual behaviour of hold-down connection with coupled tension-shear forces under monotonic load conditions. Finally, a first proposal for accounting the hysteretic behaviour is presented, and some preliminary results are shown.
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Cyclic Testing and Simulation of Hold Down Connections in Radiata Pine CLT Shear Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1605
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Benedetti, Franco
Rosales, Víctor
Opazo, Alexander
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Pine
Hold-Down
Hysteretic Model
Cyclic Loading
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 2041-2050
Summary
Structures built with cross laminated timber (CLT) are an attractive alternative to traditional construction materials in terms of environmental performance and habitability, but its structural behavior is not well understood for each timber specie. This work provides a comprehensive study of the structural behavior of radiata pine CLT shear walls, by means of laboratory testing and numerical analysis of hold down connections. The observed test response of connections is replicated by calibrating two hysteretic models on OpenSees, and its fidelity is revised through the analysis of a full scale wall test and simulation. Main outcomes suggest that advanced modelling tools can accurately reproduce the hysteretic behaviour of the connections of timber panels. In terms of connections behaviour, it is observed that hold downs on radiata pine CLT elements reach less load capacity than hold downs on other wood specie, and no significant difference with the parallel to grain capacity of angle brackets connections is noticed. Besides, it is found that radiata pine CLT walls can achieve suitable cyclic loading performance and reach high levels of displacement ductility. Furthermore, the importance of friction on the load capacity of the wall is showed.
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Experimental Testing of Hold Down Devices for Timber Frame Shear Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue401
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Connections
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Caprolu, Giuseppe
Organization
Luleå University of Technology
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Sweden
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Hold-Down
Strength
Stiffness
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Källsner and Girhammar [1] have presented a new plastic design method for wood-framed shear walls at ultimate limit state. This method allows the designer to calculate the load-carrying capacity of partially anchored shear walls, where the leading stud is not anchored against uplift. In this report hold downs have been experimentally studied with respect to the strength and stiffness of the connection. Four different types of hold downs have been tested. The specimen was subjected to tension load applied to the stud. Four tests series are presented. Each series was divided into different sets according to the type of fastener used with the hold down device. The results show that the failure load is higher when hold downs with anchor bolts are used, up to ten times higher than the anchorage that uses only screws or nails. The failure mode vary with the type of hold down and the type of fasteners used. The tests showed three primary failure modes: failure of the stud when a bolt is used as the fastener between hold down device and stud, failure due to pull-out of the screws or nails from the rail and failure due to failure or pull-out of screws or nails from stud. Also, failure of the stud itself occurred in some tests caused by some defect of the timber.
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Experimental Test of Cross Laminated Timber Connections Under Bi-Directional Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1551
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Shear Walls
Author
Liu, Jingjing
Lam, Frank
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Shear Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Shear
Tension
Angle Bracket
Hold-Down
Monotonic Tests
Cyclic Tests
Rocking Walls
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1223-1232
Summary
This paper presents results of an experimental study of commonly used angle bracket and hold-down connections in Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) wall systems under bi-directional loading. Monotonic and cyclic tests of the connections were carried out in one direction, while different levels of constant force were simultaneously applied in a perpendicular direction. The experiment aims to consider the combined and coupling effect of loads for connections in a rocking CLT shear wall system. Key mechanical characteristics of those connections were calculated, evaluated and discussed. The results show that shear and tension actions for hold-downs are quite independent but strongly coupled for angle brackets. The study gives a better understanding of hysteretic behaviour of CLT connections, and provides reliable data for future numerical analysis of CLT structures.
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Free
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Full-scale shear-wall testing for mass-timber buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2538
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Hold-Down
Dissipative Connectors
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Thomas Tannert at the University of Northern British Columbia
Summary
The project will validate an innovative hold-down system for tall mass-timber structures that will satisfy the seismic performance demands of the revised CSA-O86 design provisions for such components. Subsequent to a numerical optimization of the hold-downs, full-scale CLT shear walls equipped with the hold-downs will be coupled with different energy-dissipative shear connectors (U-shaped dissipaters and self-tapping screws) and tested under monotonic push-over and reversed-cyclic loads. The project will facilitate the development of reliable design guidance for CLT systems that constitute a promising solution for many applications including tall structures where reduced weight is advantageous for seismic design.
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High-Capacity Hold-Down for Tall Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1529
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Wood Building Systems
Author
Zhang, Xiaoyue
Popovski, Marjan
Tannert, Thomas
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Holz-Stahl-Komposit
Hold-Down
Seismic Load
Strength
Stiffness
Ductility
Failure Mechanisms
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Loading
Reverse Cyclic Loading
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 725-732
Summary
The structural use of wood in North America is dominated by light wood-frame construction used in low-rise and – more recently – mid-rise residential buildings. Mass timber engineered wood products such as laminatedveneer-lumber and cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels enable to use the material in tall and large wood and woodbased hybrid buildings. The prospect of constructing taller buildings creates challenges, one of them being the increasein lateral forces created by winds and earthquakes, thus requiring stronger hold-down devices. This paper summarises the experimental investigation on the performance a high-capacity hold-down for resisting seismic loads in tall timberbased structural systems. The connection consists of the Holz-Stahl-Komposit-System (HSK)™ glued into CLT with the modification that ductile steel yielding was allowed to occur inside the CLT panel. The strength, stiffness, ductility and failure mechanisms of this connection were evaluated under quasi-static monotonic and reversed cyclic loading. The results demonstrate that the modified hold-down-assembly provides a possible solution for use in tall timber-based structures in high seismic zones
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Racking Resistance and Ductility of CLT Shear Walls Under Horizontal and Vertical Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue457
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Yasumura, Motoi
Ito, Yoshimasa
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Yield Load
Ultimate Load
Failure Modes
Joints
Hold-Down
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
The determination procedure of the failure mechanism of CLT shear walls due to the failure of joints was presented in the 45th CIB-W18 meeting in Vaxjo1. It showed that the reliability based analysis based on the ultimate capacity of fasteners predicted quite well the failure process of shear walls when a rigid loading beam was applied. However, the failure process due to the failure of hold-down connectors was not very clear when the flexible loading beam was used. Therefore additional lateral loading tests were conducted by using flexible loading beam as shown in Fig.1 with different procedures to determine the failure mode. This new procedure based on the yield strength of shear plates and the ultimate capacity of hold-down connectors showed better determination of the failure mechanism of CLT shear walls without conspicuous slips between CLT panels. This paper shows the racking test results of CLT shear walls with different failure modes. The failure modes of shear walls were designed by using reliability analysis considering the failure of the hold down connections at the bottom end of shear wall and that of the joints connecting two CLT panels at the centre of the wall. It was shown that the design of joints with the yield capacity Py for the central joints SP and the ultimate capacity Pu for the hold down connection HD (Mode III) determined well the precedence of HD failure without slips in SP and showed high capacity, while Modes I and II failure showed higher ductility than Mode III failure.
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Seismic Resistant Cross Laminated Timber Structures Using an Innovative Resilient Friction Damping System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1479
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Hashemi, Ashkan
Valadbeigi, Armin
Masoudnia, Reza
Zarnani, Pouyan
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Resilient Slip Friction Joint
Energy Dissipation
Self-Centering
Hold-Down
Language
English
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 27-29, 2017, Wellington, New Zealand
Summary
Multi-storey timber structures are becoming progressively desirable owing to their aesthetic and environmental benefits and to the high strength to weight ratio of timber. A recent trend in timber building industry is toward cross laminated timber (CLT) panelized structures. The shake table tests within the SOFIE project have shown that the CLT buildings constructed with traditional methods can experience high damage especially at the connections which generally consist of hold-down brackets and shear connectors with mechanical fasteners such as nails or bolts. Thus, current construction methods are not recognised as reliable in seismic prone areas. The main objective of this project is to develop a new low damage structural concept using innovative resilient slip friction (RSF) damping devices. The component test results demonstrate the capacity of this novel joint for dissipating earthquake energy as well as self-centring to minimize the damage and the residual drift after a severe event. The application of RSF joints as holddown connectors for walls were investigated through numerical studies. Moreover, a core wall system comprised of cross laminated timber and RSF connectors is subjected to time-history earthquake simulations. The numerical results exhibit no residual displacement alongside a significant reduction in peak acceleration which can be attributed to significant amount of dissipated seismic energy over the RSF joints within the system.
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Free
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State-Of-The-Art Report on Seismic Behavior of Metal Connections in CLT Shear Wall Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2663
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Ha, Andy
Organization
University of Alberta
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Hold-Down
Angle Bracket
Joint
Research Status
In Progress
Summary
Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) is an innovative engineered wood product being acknowledged and utilized around the world and is pushing the height limitations of mass timber constructions. Shear walls built with cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels are an attractive system to resist seismic load in tall buildings due to their low weight. Given that the seismic performance of these CLT shear walls is largely governed by the connection behaviour, in this report, a critical review of past studies on CLT shear wall systems and the behaviour of their connections, including hold-down, angle brackets and panel joints, is presented.
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10 records – page 1 of 1.