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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Acoustically-Tested Mass Timber Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1874
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls

Acoustical Performance of Mass Timber Building Elements

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2553
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Sound Insulation
Acoustic Membrane
Acoustical Performance
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Jianhui Zhou at the University of Northern British Columbia
Summary
Building acoustics has been identified as one of the key subjects for the success of mass timber in the multi-storey building markets. The project will investigate the acoustical performance of mass timber panels produced in British Columbia. The apparent sound transmission class (ASTC) and impact insulation class (AIIC) of bare mass timber elements as wall and/ or floor elements will be measured through a lab mock-up. It is expected that a database of the sound insulation performance of British Columbia mass timber products will be developed with guidance on optimal acoustical treatments to achieve different levels of performance.
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Addendum to RR-335: Sound Transmission Through Nail-Laminated Timber (NLT) Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1868
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls

Blast Testing of Loaded Mass Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1164
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls

Development of Mass Timber Wall System Based on Nail Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2526
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Zhang, Chao
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Organization
Timber Engineering and Applied Mechanics (TEAM) Laboratory
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Shear
Stiffness
Fasteners
Fastener Type
Load
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project studied the feasibility and performance of a mass timber wall system based on Nail Laminated Timber (NLT) for floor/wall applications, in order to quantify the effects of various design parameters. Thirteen 2.4 m × 2.4 m shear walls were manufactured and tested in this phase. Together with another five specimens tested before, a total eighteen shear wall specimens and ten configurations were investigated. The design variables included fastener type, sheathing thickness, number of sheathings, sheathing material, nailing pattern, wall opening, and lumber orientation. The NLT walls were made of SprucePine-Fir (SPF) No. 2 2×4 (38 mm × 89 mm) lumber and Oriented Strand Lumber (OSB) or plywood sheathing. They were tested under monotonic and reverse-cyclic loading protocols, in accordance with ASTM E564-06 (2018) and ASTM E2126-19, respectively. Compared to traditional wood stud walls, the best performing NLT based shear wall had 2.5 times the peak load and 2 times the stiffness at 0.5-1.5% drift, while retaining high ductility. The advantage of these NLT-based wall was even greater under reverse-cyclic loading due to the internal energy dissipation of NLT. The wall with ring nails had higher stiffness than the one with smooth nails. But the performance of ring nails deteriorated drastically under reverse-cyclic loading, leading to a considerably lower capacity. Changing the sheathing thickness from 11 mm to 15 mm improved the strength by 6% while having the same initial stiffness. Adding one more face of sheathing increased the peak load and stiffness by at least 50%. The wall was also very ductile as the load dropped less than 10% when the lateral displacement exceeded 150 mm. The difference created by sheathing material was not significant if they were of the same thickness. Reducing the nailing spacing by half led to a 40% increasing in the peak load and stiffness. Having an opening of 25% of the area at the center, the lateral capacity and stiffness reached 75% or more of the full wall. A simplified method to estimate the lateral resistance of this mass timber wall system was proposed. The estimate was close to the tested capacity and was on the conservative side. Recommendations for design and manufacturing the system were also presented.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Guide for On-site Moisture Management of Wood Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1968
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Publisher
BC Housing Research Centre
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Moisture Management
Construction
Risk Mitigation
Prefabrication
Multi-Storey
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Overall moisture management during construction has become increasingly important due to the increase in building height and area, which potentially prolongs the exposure to inclement weather, and the overall increase in speed of construction, which may not allow adequate time for drying to occur. This report provides guidelines and relevant information about on-site moisture management practices that can be adapted to suit a range of wood construction projects...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Wood Design Manual 2017

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2160
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Fire
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Beams
Bridges and Spans
Columns
Floors
Ceilings
Arches
Shear Walls
Trusses
Walls

7 records – page 1 of 1.