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346 records – page 1 of 35.

North American Mass Timber: State of the Industry

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1963
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application

Encapsulated Mass Timber Construction Char Rate Analysis

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2387
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls

Construction bois de plus de 8 m de hauteur – Retours d’expériences

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2389
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Agence Qualité Construction
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
France
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Language
French
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Le développement de la construction bois, en particulier de moyenne et grande hauteur, est un enjeu clef de la transition environnementale du domaine de la construction. Il doit se faire de façon la plus qualitative possible. Des opérations de construction bois de moyenne et grande hauteur sont déjà menées par des acteurs précurseurs et doivent être envisagées comme des piliers pour préfigurer les développements à venir. Le Rapport REX sur les constructions bois de plus de 8 m de hauteur permet de capitaliser et de valoriser leurs retours d’expériences afin de sensibiliser et de guider l’ensemble des acteurs de la filière aux enjeux de la construction bois. Cette montée en compétences par le partage des points de vigilance et des bonnes pratiques est le gage d’un développement à la hauteur des objectifs de qualité, de performance et de confort visés.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Cross Laminated Timber Shear Wall Connections for Seismic Applications

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2405
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Falk, Michael
Publisher
Kansas State University
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Panels
Earthquake
Rocking Walls
Shear Walls
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Cross Laminated Timber Shear Wall Connections for Seismic Applications

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2406
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Falk, Michael
Publisher
Kansas State University
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Panels
Earthquake
Rocking Walls
Shear Walls
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Design Guide for Timber-Concrete Composite Floors in Canada

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2460
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Acoustics and Vibration
Fire
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Acoustics and Vibration
Fire
Keywords
Shear Connection
Ultimate Limit States
Vibration
Fire Resistance
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
As part of its research work on wood buildings, FPInnovations has recently launched a Design Guide for Timber-Concrete Composite Floors in Canada. This technique, far from being new, could prove to be a cost-competitive solution for floors with longer-span since the mechanical properties of the two materials act in complementarity. Timber-concrete systems consist of two distinct layers, a timber layer and a concrete layer (on top), joined together by shear connectors. The properties of both materials are then better exploited since tension forces from bending are mainly resisted by the timber, while compression forces from bending are resisted by the concrete. This guide, which contains numerous illustrations and formulas to help users better plan their projects, addresses many aspects of the design of timber-concrete composite floors, for example shear connection systems, ultimate limit state design, vibration and fire resistance of floors, and much more.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Evaluation of Fire-Retardant Treated Laminated Veneer Lumber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2471
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
General Application

Calculating the Fire Resistance of Wood Members and Assemblies: Technical Report No. 10

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2492
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Fire
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Beams
Floors
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Decking

Development of Mass Timber Wall System Based on Nail Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2526
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Zhang, Chao
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Organization
Timber Engineering and Applied Mechanics (TEAM) Laboratory
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Shear
Stiffness
Fasteners
Fastener Type
Load
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project studied the feasibility and performance of a mass timber wall system based on Nail Laminated Timber (NLT) for floor/wall applications, in order to quantify the effects of various design parameters. Thirteen 2.4 m × 2.4 m shear walls were manufactured and tested in this phase. Together with another five specimens tested before, a total eighteen shear wall specimens and ten configurations were investigated. The design variables included fastener type, sheathing thickness, number of sheathings, sheathing material, nailing pattern, wall opening, and lumber orientation. The NLT walls were made of SprucePine-Fir (SPF) No. 2 2×4 (38 mm × 89 mm) lumber and Oriented Strand Lumber (OSB) or plywood sheathing. They were tested under monotonic and reverse-cyclic loading protocols, in accordance with ASTM E564-06 (2018) and ASTM E2126-19, respectively. Compared to traditional wood stud walls, the best performing NLT based shear wall had 2.5 times the peak load and 2 times the stiffness at 0.5-1.5% drift, while retaining high ductility. The advantage of these NLT-based wall was even greater under reverse-cyclic loading due to the internal energy dissipation of NLT. The wall with ring nails had higher stiffness than the one with smooth nails. But the performance of ring nails deteriorated drastically under reverse-cyclic loading, leading to a considerably lower capacity. Changing the sheathing thickness from 11 mm to 15 mm improved the strength by 6% while having the same initial stiffness. Adding one more face of sheathing increased the peak load and stiffness by at least 50%. The wall was also very ductile as the load dropped less than 10% when the lateral displacement exceeded 150 mm. The difference created by sheathing material was not significant if they were of the same thickness. Reducing the nailing spacing by half led to a 40% increasing in the peak load and stiffness. Having an opening of 25% of the area at the center, the lateral capacity and stiffness reached 75% or more of the full wall. A simplified method to estimate the lateral resistance of this mass timber wall system was proposed. The estimate was close to the tested capacity and was on the conservative side. Recommendations for design and manufacturing the system were also presented.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Braced Frame System for Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2527
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Frames
Author
Iqbal, Asif
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Frames
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Lateral Load Resisting Systems
Sustainability
Post-Tensioned
Connections
Braced Frame Model
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Advanced sustainable lateral load resisting systems that combine ductile and recyclable materials offer a viable solution to resist seismic load effects in environmentally responsible ways. This paper presents the seismic response of a post-tensioned timber-steel hybrid braced frame. This hybrid system combines glulam frame with steel braces to improve lateral stiffness while providing self-centreing capability under seismic loads. The proposed system is first presented. A detailed numerical model of the proposed system is then developed with emphasis on the connections and inelastic response of bracing members. Various types of braced frames including diagonal, cross and chevron configurations are numerically examined to assess the viability of the proposed concept and to confirm the efficiency of the system. A summary of initial findings is presented to demonstrate usefulness of the hybrid system. The results demonstrate that the proposed system increases overall lateral stiffness and ductility while still being able to achieve self-centring. Some additional information on connection details are provided for implementation in practical structures. The braced-frame solution is expected to widen options for lateral load resisting systems for mid-to-high-rise buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

346 records – page 1 of 35.