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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Surface Burning Characteristics of V2 Stress Grade Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue398
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dagenais, Christian
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Flame Spread
National Building Code of Canada
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Advanced wood building systems form a significant market opportunity for use of wood in taller and larger buildings, which are currently required to be of non-combustible construction in accordance with provisions set forth in Part 3 of Division B of the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC)...
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Literature Review: Fire Stop Requirements as Related to Massive Wood Wall and Floor Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue405
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Market and Adoption
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dagenais, Christian
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Fire
Keywords
Fire Stop
Canada
National Building Code of Canada
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In an attempt to prevent the spread of fire and smoke beyond the compartment in which the fire starts, regulations often require building construction such as walls and floors to exhibit varying degrees of fire resistance. Since penetrations for building service equipment and systems in wall and floor assemblies acting as fire separations are unavoidable...
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Fire Safe Glued Massive Timber Members Adhesive Bonding Performance under Elevated Temperature -Tests Report

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue169
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Author
Zhang, Chao
Yan, Huijun
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Organization
Forestry Innovation Investment
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Topic
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Temperature
Adhesives
Bondlines
Polyurethane
Douglas-Fir
Hemlock
SPF
Phenol-Resorcinol Formaldehyde
Epoxy
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project was conducted to quantify the performance of adhesives bond lines under shear load subject to elevated temperature. The results add to the understanding of the performance of polyurethane adhesive bond lines under elevated temperatures to ad...
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US Edition - Chapter 8: Fire Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue827
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Dagenais, Christian
White, Robert
Sumathipala, Kuma
Organization
FPInnovations
Binational Softwood Lumber Council
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
United States
Format
Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Charring Rate
Fire Resistance
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
CLT Handbook - US Edition
ISBN
978-0-86488-553-1
ISSN
1925-0495
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a promising wood-based structural component and has potential to provide cost-effective building solution for residential, commercial and institutional buildings as well as large industrial facilities. Market acceptance of CLT requires that it meets the applicable building code requirements. CLT elements are used in building systems in similar manner to concrete slabs and solid wall elements, as well as to those from heavy timber construction, by avoiding concealed spaces due to the use of massive timber elements, thus reducing the risk of fire spread beyond its point of origin. Moreover, CLT construction typically uses CLT panels for floor and loadbearing walls, will allow fire-rated compartmentalization, again reducing the risk of fire spread beyond it spoint of origin. ...
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Fire-Resistance Test Report of E1 Stress Grade Cross-Laminated Timber Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue356
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Fire
Keywords
National Building Code of Canada
Fire Resistance
Type X Gypsum Board
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
A series of 3 cross-laminated timber (CLT) fire-resistance tests were conducted in accordance with ULC S101 standard as required in the National Building Code of Canada. The first two tests were 3-ply wall assemblies which were 105 mm thick, one unprotected and the other protected with an intumescent coating, FLAMEBLOC® GS 200, on the exposed surface...
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Prediction of Dynamic Response of a 7-Storey Massive XLam Wooden Building Tested on a Shaking Table

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1885
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)

US Edition - Chapter 9: Sound Insulation of Cross-Laminated Timber Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue828
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Ceilings
Author
Hu, Lin
Adams, David
Organization
FPInnovations
Binational Softwood Lumber Council
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
United States
Format
Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Ceilings
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Sound Insulation
International Building Code
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
CLT Handbook - US Edition
ISBN
978-0-86488-553-1
ISSN
1925-0495
Summary
The intent of this Chapter is to answer simple questions related to the definition of sound, its sources, quantification and methods of measurement, acceptable levels of sound, differences between sound and noise, etc. Of course, when verbalizing such questions, the solutions for sound control will be naturally unfolded to readers. This Chapter is intended to thoroughly separate myth from reality. The Chapter also introduces the International Building Code (IBC) requirements for sound insulation in buildings. State of the art construction details for CLT walls and floor/ceiling assemblies generally meeting IBC requirements are provided herein and are based on results of tests performed in various laboratories in the world and in the field by FPInnovations. A step by step construction practices guide then leads the reader towards the final goal, which is the occupants' satisfaction. We expect that after reading this Chapter, the reader will be in a position to acknowledge that CLT buildings can achieve satisfactory sound insulation levels if proper design and installation are followed. Note that, considering the short history of CLT construction, the journey is only beginning.
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Field Study of Hygrothermal Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber Wall Assemblies with Built-In Moisture

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1588
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
McClung, Victoria
Organization
Ryerson University
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Keywords
Hygrothermal
Drying
Wetting
North America
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Preliminary Assessment of Hygrothermal Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber Wall Assemblies Using Hygrothermal Models

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2628
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Moisture
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Wang, J.
Baldracchi, P.
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2010
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Moisture
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Keywords
Hygrothermal
Moisture Performance
Rainscreen
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Preliminary simulation was carried out using hygIRC and WUFI, both 1-D hygrothermal models, to analyze moisture performance of rainscreened wood-frame walls and cross-laminated timber (CLT) walls for the climates in Vancouver and Calgary. The major results are as follows. In order to provide baseline knowledge, preliminary comparisons between hygIRC and WUFI were conducted to investigate the effects of climate data, wall orientations and rain intrusion on the performance of the rainscreened wood-frame walls based on Vancouver’s climate. hygIRC tended to produce almost constant moisture content (MC) of the plywood sheathing throughout a year but WUFI showed greater variations, particularly when the ventilation of the rainscreen cavity was neglected. Rainscreen cavity ventilation provided dramatic drying potentials for wall assemblies based on the WUFI simulation. hygIRC indicated that east-facing walls had the highest moisture load, but the differences between orientations seemed negligible in WUFI when the rainscreen cavity ventilation was taken into account. When 1% of wind-driven rain was simulated as an additional moisture load, hygIRC suggested that the rainscreen walls could not dry out in Vancouver, WUFI, however, indicated that they could dry to a safe MC level in the summer. The discrepancies in material property data between the two models and between different databases in WUFI (even for the same wood species) were found to be very large. In terms of wood sorption data, large differences existed at near-saturated RH levels. This is a result of using pressure-plate/membrane methods for measuring material equilibrium moisture content (EMC) under high RH conditions. The EMC of wood at near-100% RH conditions measured with these methods can be higher than 200%, suggesting wood in construction would decay without liquid water intrusion or severe vapour condensation. The pressure-plate/membrane methods also appeared to be highly species-dependent, and have higher EMC at a certain RH level for less permeable species, from which it is relatively difficult to remove water during the measurement. The hygrothermal simulation in this work suggested that such a species bias caused by testing methods could put impermeable species (most Canadian species) at a disadvantage to permeable species like southern pine during related durability design of building assemblies. In terms of using CLT for construction in Vancouver and Calgary, the WUFI simulations suggested that the use of less permeable materials such as EPS (expanded polystyrene insulation), XPS (extruded polystyrene insulation), self-adhered bituminous membrane and polyethylene in wall assemblies reduced the ability of the walls to dry. On the other hand, permeable assemblies such as those using relatively permeable insulation like semi-rigid mineral wool (rock wool) as exterior insulation, instead of less permeable exterior insulation materials, would help walls dry. The simulation also suggested that using CLT products with initially low MC would significantly reduce moisture-related risks, which indicated the importance of protecting CLT and avoiding wetting during transportation and construction. In addition, the simulation found that indoor relative humidity (RH) conditions generated by the indoor RH prediction models included in hygIRC and WUFI varied greatly under the same basic climate and building conditions. The intermediate method specified in ASHRAE Standard 160 P resulted in long periods of saturated RH conditions throughout a year for the Vancouver climate, which may not be representative of ordinary residential buildings in Vancouver. The simulation in this study is preliminary and exploratory. It would be arbitrary to recommend one model over the other based on this report or use the simulation results directly for CLT wall assembly design without consultation with building science specialists. However, this work revealed more opportunities for close collaborations between the wood science and the building science communities. More work should be carried out to develop appropriate testing methods and assemble material property data for hygrothermal simulation of wood-based building assemblies. Model improvement and field verification are also strongly recommended, particularly for new building systems such as CLT constructions.
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10 records – page 1 of 1.