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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Increasing Deemed to Satisfy Height Limits for Timber Construction Cost Benefit Analysis

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1929
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Cost
Material
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
The Centre for International Economics
Publisher
Forest & Wood Products Australia
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Australia
Format
Report
Material
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Cost
Keywords
NCC
Mid-Rise
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
ISBN
978-1-925213-11-9
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Exploring Cross-Laminated Timber Use for Temporary Military Structures: Ballistic Considerations

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2371
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Sanborn, Kathryn
Publisher
Georgia Institute of Technology
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Ballistic Resistance
Panels
Military Structures
Blast Analysis Tool
Spruce-Pine-Fir
Southern Pine
SPF
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The design and construction of temporary military structures has changed little since World War II. While these structures are lightweight and rapidly deployable, they require a sizeable workforce to construct and provide minimal ballistic and blast protection for occupants. Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a relatively new prefabricated engineered wood product that is strong, stiff, quick to build, and has the potential to offer inherent ballistic and blast resistance compared to traditional wood products. The orthotropic nature of CLT coupled with the energy absorbing capacity of the thick wood panels warrant further investigation into the viability of CLT for temporary military structures. To that end, the research presented in this thesis seeks to better understand the ballistic and blast response of CLT panels and to develop evaluation criteria for the use of CLT in temporary military structures. Specific areas of investigation included: 1) experimental testing of the ballistic resistance of CLT panels, conducting in conjunction with U.S. Army laboratories in Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland and Vicksburg, Mississippi; 2) the design, prototyping, and experimental testing of enhanced CLT panels to further improve ballistic performance; 3) a qualitative analysis of CLT panels under ballistic impact resistance mechanisms; 4) the development of a CLT blast analysis tool to predict the elastic response of CLT to blast loadings; and 5) the development of a simplified tool to identify evaluation criteria for temporary military structure material selection, including conventional materials as well as CLT. Specimens in this research consisted of commercially produced Spruce-Pine-Fir CLT as well as Southern Pine CLT specimens fabricated specifically for this research. Ballistic testing of both types of conventional CLT indicate that the material’s inherent penetration resistance is significantly greater than that of dimension lumber and plywood used in current common temporary military structures. The testing shows that current U.S. military design guidelines (UFC 4-023-07), used for determining required wood thickness based on ballistic threat, under predicts the ballistic performance of CLT. From testing and analysis, the thesis develops updated equations for predicting the thickness of CLT required for ballistic protection. A qualitative analysis of ballistic specimens identified local failure modes in the CLT and links the observed damage the anisotropic material properties, grading, and defects in sawn timbers. Enhanced CLT specimens were fabricated using various hardening materials including thin metal plates and gratings, polymer-based armors, and fiber-reinforced epoxy matrix panels. The enhanced CLTs were evaluated based on ease of production, ballistic resistance as compared to conventional CLT, and cost-benefit analysis. The shear analogy method was incorporated into a single-degree-of-freedom blast analysis to predict the response of different types and sizes of CLT panels under blast loads within the elastic regime. The tool was validated using field data from low-level live blast tests and showed good agreement with the field data. Finally, tailored evaluation criteria for comparative assessment of construction materials for use in temporary military structures – considering issues of cost, the logistics of in-theater deployment, energy consumption and force protection were developed and applied through using the AHP decision-making process.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Market Survey of Timber Prefabricated Envelopes for New and Existing Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2198
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Building Envelope

Experimental Investigation on the Shear Resistance of Existing Glulam Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2439
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Schulte-Wrede, Michael
Merk, Michael
Dietsch, Philipp
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Portugal
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Shear Resistance
Bending Tests
Aging Processes
Drill Cores
Language
English
Conference
International Conference on Structural Health Assessment of Timber Structures
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Evaluation of Thermal Performance, Environmental Impact, and Cost Effectiveness of an XLam Component for Retrofitting in Existing Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1414
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Environmental Impact
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dalla Mora, Tiziano
Righi, Alessandro
Peron, Fabio
Romagnoni, Piercarlo
Publisher
Springer, Cham
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Book Section
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Environmental Impact
Cost
Keywords
Retrofit
Installation
Assembly
Prototype
Italy
Residential
Thermal
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Mediterranean Green Buildings & Renewable Energy
ISBN
978-3-319-30746-6
Online Access
Payment Required
Resource Link
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A New Construction System for CLT Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue679
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Polastri, Andrea
Angeli, Albino
Gianni, Dal
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Keywords
Prefabrication
Preassembled Connection System
Production
Strength
Stiffness
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
The technique proposed herein, aims to solve the construction site issues related to both the handling and the assembly of cross laminated timber walls (CLT), through an innovative preassembled connection system. This system, which thanks to its being pr...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Encapsulated Mass Timber Construction - Cost Comparison Canada: Construction, Time & Maintenance Cost-Benefit Report

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2359
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Floors
Organization
Hanscomb
Publisher
National Research Council Canada
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Floors
Topic
Cost
Keywords
Encapsulated Mass Timber Construction
Building Code
Time
Construction Time
Construction Cost
Maintenance Cost
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The Task Group on Combustible Construction is in the process of evaluating a proposed code change request related to buildings of encapsulated mass timber construction (EMTC). As part of the analysis of the code change request, an impact analysis is required that includes a cost-benefit analysis. Hanscomb was hired to provide a cost-benefit analysis and to compare the estimated value of the following: 1. The cost of constructing a building of mass timber (unprotected) versus a building constructed of encapsulated mass timber (e.g. mass timber protected with a double layer of Type X gypsum board) versus a traditional concrete and steel building. 2. The time to build a building of mass timber construction (unprotected) versus a building of encapsulated mass timber construction versus a traditional concrete and steel building. 3. The annual maintenance costs of building of mass timber construction versus a building of encapsulated mass timber construction versus a traditional concrete and steel building. For the purposes of this study two sets of conceptual floor plans and elevations have been created: 1. A 12 storey building with a Group C major occupancy (residential) where each storey is 6,000 m2 in floor area. 2. A 12 storey building with a Group D major occupancy (office) where each storey is 7,200 m2 in floor area.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Cost, Time and Environmental Impacts of the Construction of the New NMIT Arts and Media Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue251
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Design of an Energy-Efficient and Cost-Effective Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) House in Waikuku Beach, New Zealand

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2364
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Energy Performance
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Author
Bournique, Guillaume
Publisher
KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Sweden
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Energy Performance
Keywords
Energy Efficiency
Cost-Competitive
Residential
Housing
Energy Consumption
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The Canterbury earthquakes in 2010 and 2011 caused significant damage to the Christchurch building stock. However, it is an opportunity to build more comfortable and energy efficient buildings. Previous research suggests a tendency to both under heat and spot heat, meaning that New Zealand dwellings are partly heated and winter indoor temperatures do not always meet the recommendations of the World Health Organization. Those issues are likely to be explained by design deficiency, poor thermal envelope, and limitations of heating systems. In that context, the thesis investigates the feasibility of building an energy efficient and cost-competitive house in Christchurch. Although capital costs for an energy efficient house are inevitably higher, they are balanced with lower operating costs and improved thermal comfort. The work is supported by a residential building project using Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) panels. This atypical project is compared with a typical New Zealand house (reference building), regarding both energy efficiency and costs. The current design of the CLT building is discussed according to passive design strategies, and a range of improvements for the building design is proposed. This final design proposal is determined by prioritizing investments in design options having the greatest effect on the building overall energy consumption. Building design features include windows efficiencies, insulation levels, optimized thermal mass, lighting fixture, as well as HVAC and domestic hot water systems options. The improved case for the CLT building is simulated having a total energy consumption of 4,860kWh/year, which corresponds to a remarkable 60% energy savings over the baseline. The construction cost per floor area is slightly higher for the CLT building, about 2,900$/m² against 2,500$/m² for the timber framed house. But a life cycle cost analysis shows that decreased operating costs makes the CLT house cost-competitive over its lifetime. The thesis suggests that the life cycle cost of the CLT house is 14% less than that of the reference building, while the improved CLT design reaches about 22% costs savings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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RILEM TC "Reinforcement of Timber Elements in Existing Structures"

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue433
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
General Application
Author
Tannert, Thomas
Branco, Jorge
Riggio, Mariapaola
Publisher
Scientific.net
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
General Application
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Fiber Reinforced Polymer
Dovetail Joints
Reinforcement
Adhesive
Self-Tapping Screws
Strength
Stiffness
Bending Stiffness
Load Bearing Capacity
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Advanced Materials Research
Summary
The paper reports on the activities of the RILEM technical committee Reinforcement of Timber Elements in Existing Structures. The main objective of the committee is to coordinate the efforts to improve the reinforcement practice of timber structural...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.