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58 records – page 1 of 6.

Methods for Practice-Oriented Linear Analysis in Seismic Design of Cross Laminated Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2304
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Stress-laminated timber decks in bridges: Friction between lamellas, butt joints and pre-stressing system

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2891
Year of Publication
2020
Application
Decking
Author
Massaro, Francesco Mirko
Malo, Kjell Arne
Organization
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Application
Decking
Keywords
Stress Laminated
Timber Bridges
Butt-Joint
Stiffness
Friction
Pre-Stress
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engineering Structures
Summary
Stress-laminated timber (SLT) decks in bridges are popular structural systems in bridge engineering. SLT decks are made from parallel timber beams placed side by side and pre-stressed together by means of steel rods. SLT decks can be in any length by just using displaced butt joints. The paper presents results from friction experiments performed in both grain and transverse direction with different levels of pre-stress. Numerical simulations of these experiments in addition to comparisons to full-scale experiments of SLT decks presented in literature verified the numerical model approach. Furthermore, several alternative SLT deck configurations with different amounts of butt joints and pre-stressing rod locations were modelled to study their influence on the structural properties of SLT decks. Finally, some recommendations on design of SLT bridge decks are given.
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Dynamic Response of Tall Timber Buildings Under Service Load - The DynaTTB Research Program

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3015
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Abrahamsen, Rune
Bjertnæs, Magne
Bouillot, Jacques
Brank, Bostjan
Cabaton, Lionel
Crocetti, Roberto
Flamand, Olivier
Garains, Fabien
Gavric, Igor
Germain, Olivier
Hahusseau, Ludwig
Hameury, Stephane
Johansson, Marie
Johansson, Thomas
Ao, Wai Kei
Kurent, Blaž
Landel, Pierre
Linderholt, Andreas
Malo, Kjell
Manthey, Manuel
Nåvik, Petter
Pavic, Alex
Perez, Fernando
Rönnquist, Anders
Stamatopoulos, Haris
Sustersic, Iztok
Tulebekova, Saule
Organization
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
University of Exeter
University of Ljubljana
Linnaeus University
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Conference Paper
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Timber Building
Wind Load
Discomfort
Modelling
Damping
Full Scale
Conference
International Conference on Structural Dynamics
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Wind-induced dynamic excitation is becoming a governing design action determining size and shape of modern Tall Timber Buildings (TTBs). The wind actions generate dynamic loading, causing discomfort or annoyance for occupants due to the perceived horizontal sway – i.e. vibration serviceability failure. Although some TTBs have been instrumented and measured to estimate their key dynamic properties (natural frequencies and damping), no systematic evaluation of dynamic performance pertinent to wind loading has been performed for the new and evolving construction technology used in TTBs. The DynaTTB project, funded by the Forest Value research program, mixes on site measurements on existing buildings excited by heavy shakers, for identification of the structural system, with laboratory identification of building elements mechanical features coupled with numerical modelling of timber structures. The goal is to identify and quantify the causes of vibration energy dissipation in modern TTBs and provide key elements to FE modelers. The first building, from a list of 8, was modelled and tested at full scale in December 2019. Some results are presented in this paper. Four other buildings will be modelled and tested in spring 2021.
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Butt-Joint Bonding of Timber as a Key Technology for Point-Supported, Biaxial Load Bearing Flat Slabs Made of Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2466
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Zöllig, Stefan
Muster, Marcel
Themessl, Adam
Publisher
IOP Publishing Ltd
Year of Publication
2019
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Butt-Joint
Bending Strength
Shear Resistance
Research Status
Complete
Series
IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science
Online Access
Free
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Ability of Finger-Jointed Lumber to Maintain Load at Elevated Temperatures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1832
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Material
Other Materials
Author
Rammer, Douglas
Zelinka, Samuel
Hasburgh, Laura
Craft, Steven
Publisher
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Journal Article
Material
Other Materials
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Small Scale
Full Scale
Bending Test
Melamine Formaldehyde
Phenol-Resorcinol Formaldehyde
Creep
Polyurethane
Polyvinyl Acetate
Temperature
Durability
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood and Fiber Science. 50(1): 44-54.
Summary
This article presents a test method that was developed to screen adhesive formulations for finger-jointed lumber. The goal was to develop a small-scale test that could be used to predict whether an adhesive would pass a full-scale ASTM E119 wall assembly test. The method involved loading a 38-mm square finger-jointed sample in a four-point bending test inside of an oven with a target sample temperature of 204°C. The deformation (creep) was examined as a function of time. It was found that samples fingerjointed with melamine formaldehyde and phenol resorcinol formaldehyde adhesives had the same creep behavior as solid wood. One-component polyurethane and polyvinyl acetate adhesives could not maintain the load at the target temperature measured middepth of the sample, and several different types of creep behavior were observed before failure. This method showed that the creep performance of the onecomponent adhesives may be quite different than the performance from short-term load deformation curves collected at high temperatures. The importance of creep performance of adhesives in the fire resistance of engineered wood is discussed.
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Experimental Seismic Behavior of a Two-Story CLT Platform Building: Shake Table Testing Results

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2052
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
van de Lindt, John
Amini, Omar
Furley, Jace
Pei, Shiling
Tamagnone, Gabriele
Barbosa, André
Line, Philip
Rammer, Douglas
Fragiacomo, Massimo
Organization
Colorado State University
University of Trieste
Oregon State University
Amarican Wood Council
Forest Products Laboratory
University of L'Aquila
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Shake Table Tests
Full Scale
Service Level Earthquake
Design Base Earthquake
Maximum Considered Earthquake
Seismic Force Resisting System
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
With the increased usage of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) in the United States, research efforts have been focused on demonstrating CLT as an effective Seismic Force Resisting System (SFRS). Presented in this paper are the findings of full-scale shake table tests of a two-story 223 m2 (2400 ft2) building with two sets of CLT shear walls on the first and second story. The testing consisted of three phases, each with a unique wall configuration, but only the first phase is presented herein, which consisted of a shear wall with 4:1 aspect ratio CLT panels. The structure was subjected to ground motions scaled to intensities that correspond to a Service Level Earthquake (SLE), Design Base Earthquake (DBE), and Maximum Considered Earthquake (MCE) respectively. In all phases and motions the structure performed well and was in accordance with FEMA collapse prevention requirements for each motion intensity.
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Construction and Seismic Testing of a Resilient Two-Story Mass Timber Structure with Cross Laminated Rocking Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2223
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Simple Cross-Laminated Timber Shear Connections with Spatially Arranged Screws

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1716
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Loss, Cristiano
Hossain, Afrin
Tannert, Thomas
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Self-Tapping Screws
Butt-Joint
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Loading
Reverse Cyclic Loading
Yield Load
Load Carrying Capacity
Slips
Elastic Stiffness
Ductility
Energy Dissipation
Strength
Angle
Model
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engineering Structures
Summary
This paper presents an experimental study to evaluate the use of spatially arranged self-tapping screws (STS) as shear connections for cross-laminated timber panels. Specifically, simple butt joints combined with crossed STS with different inclinations were investigated under quasi-static monotonic and reversed-cyclic loadings. The influence of the number and angle of insertion of screws, screws characteristics, friction and loading on the joint performance was explored. The yield load, load-carrying capacity and related slips, elastic stiffness, and ductility were evaluated considering two groups of tests performed on a total of 63 specimens of different size. Performance of connections with respect to the energy dissipation and loss of strength under cyclic loads was also investigated. It was shown that the spatial insertion angle of screws plays a key role in the performance of joints, not only because it relates to the shank to grain angle, but also because it affects the amount of wood involved in the bearing mechanism. Design models of STS connections are presented and discussed, and the test results are compared against analytical predictions. While good agreement for load-carrying capacity was obtained, the existing stiffness model seems less adequate with a consistent overestimation.
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Free
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Softwood Lumber Board Glulam Connection Fire Test Summary Report

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue700
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Connections
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Columns
Organization
Arup USA
Softwood Lumber Board
MyTiCon
DR Johnson
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Columns
Topic
Connections
Fire
Keywords
Beam-to-Column Connectors
Fire Resistance Rating
Full Scale
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The Softwood Lumber Board, Arup, MyTiCon and DR Johnson have partnered to complete three full-scale fire tests for glulam beam to column connectors. The fire tests have been completed for “off-the-shelf” connectors for glulam beams, testing the connector to meet a minimum of a 1hr fire resistance rating (FRR). To assist the construction industry, three different configurations of glulam beam to column connections were fire tested at an approved fire testing facility. The fire tests were carried out to meet ASTM E119-16a “Standard Test Methods for Fire Tests of Building Construction and Materials”, hence meeting Chapter 7 of the IBC. The completed fire tests and supporting reports allow engineers and architects to specify these tested connection assemblies and satisfy the requirements of the IBC. Approval by an authority having jurisdiction (AHJ) will therefore be easier for future building projects.
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Free
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Mass Timber Rocking Panel Retrofit of a Four-Story Soft-Story Building with Full-Scale Shake Table Validation

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue833
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bahmani, Pouria
van de Lindt, John
Iqbal, Asif
Rammer, Douglas
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
FEMA
Full Scale
Retrofit
Seismic
Shake Table Test
Soft-Story
US
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
Summary
Soft-story wood-frame buildings have been recognized as a disaster preparedness problem for decades. There are tens of thousands of these multi-family three- and four-story structures throughout California and other cities in the United States. The majority were constructed between 1920 and 1970, with many being prevalent in the San Francisco Bay Area in California. The NEES-Soft project was a five-university multi-industry effort that culminated in a series of full-scale soft-story wood-frame building tests to validate retrofit philosophies proposed by (1) the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) P-807 guidelines and (2) a performance-based seismic retrofit (PBSR) approach developed within the project. Four different retrofit designs were developed and validated at full-scale, each with specified performance objectives, which were typically not the same. This paper focuses on the retrofit design using cross laminated timber (CLT) rocking panels and presents the experimental results of the full-scale shake table test of a four-story 370 m2 (4000 ft2) soft-story test building with that FEMA P-807 focused retrofit in place. The building was subjected to the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1992 Cape Mendocino ground motions scaled to 5% damped spectral accelerations ranging from 0.2 to 0.9 g.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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58 records – page 1 of 6.