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Identifying Mass Timber Research Priorities, Barriers to Adoption and Engineering, Procurement and Construction Challenges In Canada

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2372
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Syed, Taha
Publisher
University of Toronto
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Mass Timber
Barriers
Research Priorities
Challenges
Construction
Engineering
Procurement
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Mass timber construction in Canada is in the spotlight and emerging as a sustainable building system that offers an opportunity to optimize the value of every tree harvested and to revitalize a declining forest industry, while providing climate mitigation solutions. Little research has been conducted, however, to identify the mass timber research priorities of end users, barriers to adoption and engineering, procurement and construction challenges in Canada. This study helps bridge these gaps. The study also created an interactive, three-dimensional GIS map displaying mass timber projects across North America, as an attempt to offer a helpful tool to practitioners, researchers and students, and fill a gap in existing knowledge sharing. The study findings, based on a web-based survey of mass timber end users, suggest the need for more research on (a) total project cost comparisons with concrete and steel, (b) hybrid systems and (c) mass timber building construction methods and guidelines. The most important barriers for successful adoption are (a) misconceptions about mass timber with respect to fire and building longevity, (b) high and uncertain insurance premiums, (c) higher cost of mass timber products compared to concrete and steel, and (d) resistance to changing from concrete and steel. In terms of challenges: (a) building code compliance and regulations, (b) design permits and approvals, and (c) insufficient design experts in the market are rated by study participants as the most pressing “engineering” challenge. The top procurement challenges are (a) too few manufactures and suppliers, (b) long distance transportation, and (c) supply and demand gaps. The most important construction challenges are (a) inadequate skilled workforce, (b) inadequate specialized subcontractors, and (c) excessive moisture exposure during construction.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Solutions for Upper Mid-Rise and High-Rise Mass Timber Construction: Infrared Imaging for Fire Risks

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2090
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Fire
Site Construction Management
Material
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Design Options for Three- and Four-Storey Wood School Buildings in British Columbia

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2373
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Author
Bevilacqua, Nick
Dickof, Carla
Wolfe, Ray
Gan, Wei-Jie
Embury-Williams, Lynn
Organization
Fast + Epp
Wood Works! BC
Thinkspace
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Construction
Education
School Buildings
Mass Timber
Multi-Storey
Building Code
Fire Protection
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This study illustrates the range of possible wood construction approaches for school buildings that are up to four storeys in height. As land values continue to rise, particularly in higher-density urban environments, schools with smaller footprints will become increasingly more necessary to satisfy enrollment demands. There are currently a number of planned new school projects throughout British Columbia that anticipate requiring either three-or four-storey buildings, and it is forecasted that the demand for school buildings of this size will continue to rise. This study is closely related to the report Risk Analysis and Alternative Solution for Three- and Four-Storey Schools of Mass Timber and/or Wood-Frame Construction prepared by GHL Consultants, which explores the building code related considerations of wood construction for school buildings that are up to four storeys in height. Though wood construction offers a viable structural material option for these buildings, the British Columbia Building Code (BCBC 2018) currently limits schools comprised of wood construction to a maximum of two storeys, while also imposing limits on the overall floor area. As such, the reader is referred to the GHL report for further information regarding building code compliance (with a particular emphasis on fire protection) for wood school buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

A Holistic Approach for Industrializing Timber Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2378
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Site Construction Management
Design and Systems
Material
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Santana-Sosa, Aída
Fadai, Alireza
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Site Construction Management
Design and Systems
Keywords
Prefabrication
Off-site Construction
BIM
Mass Timber
Construction
Carbon
Language
English
Conference
Sustainable Built Environment D-A-CH Conference
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Many strategies have been investigated seeking for efficiency in construction sector, since it has been pointed out as the largest consumer of raw materials worldwide and responsible of about 1/3 of the global CO2 emissions. While operational carbon has been strongly reduced due to building regulations, embodied carbon is becoming dominating. Resources and processes involved from material extraction to building erection should be carefully optimized aiming to reduce the emissions from the cradle to service. New advancements in timber engineering have shown the capabilities of this renewable and CO2 neutral material in multi-storey buildings. Since their erection is based on prefabrication, an accurate construction management is eased where variations and waste are sensible to be minimized. Through this paper, the factors constraining the use of wood as main material for multi-storey buildings will be explored and the potential benefits of using Lean Construction principles in the timber industry are highlighted aiming to achieve a standardized workflow from design to execution. Hence, a holistic approach towards industrialization is proposed from an integrated BIM model, through an optimized supply chain of off-site production, and to a precise aligned scheduled on-site assembly.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Quality Control and Quality Assurance in Hybrid Mass Timber High-Rise Construction: A Case Study of the Brock Commons

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1272
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Site Construction Management
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems

Study of Moisture Conditions in a Multi-Story Mass Timber Building through the Use of Sensors and WUFI Hygrothermal Modeling

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1429
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Moisture
Site Construction Management
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Moisture Monitoring Throughout the Construction and Occupancy of Mass Timber Builidings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1834
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Author
Zelinka, Samuel
Glass, Samuel
Kordziel, Steven
Tabares-Velasco, Paulo
Pei, Shiling
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Publisher
University of Victoria
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Dimensional Instability
Microbial Attack
Fastener Corrosion
Cracking
Construction
Language
English
Conference
International Conference on New Horizons in Green Civil Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 25-27,2018. Victoria, Canada
Summary
This paper presents preliminary findings from an ongoing research program instrumenting CLT buildings to measure wood moisture content. An overview of the research program is presented along with data from first year of moisture monitoring in an 8-story building in Portland, Oregon. This project measures the wood moisture content throughout the construction cycle, including the fabrication, shipping, staging, and erection of the panels. These preliminary field measurements can help characterize moisture changes in CLT during construction and guide the construction of future CLT buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Building Information Modeling (BIM) and Design for Manufacturing and Assembly (DfMA) for Mass Timber Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1921
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Staub-French, Sheryl
Poirier, Erik
Calderon, Francisco
Chikhi, Imen
Zadeh, Puyan
Chudasma, Divyarajsinh
Huang, Shitian
Publisher
BIM TOPiCS Research Lab
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Model
Building Information Modeling
Design for Manufacturing and Assembly
Construction
BIM
DfMA
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The increasing appetite for innovation, performance and sustainability in the Canadian Architecture, Engineering, Construction, Owners and Operators (AECOO) community is leading to the development and deployment of approaches, be they tools, technologies, practices, etc., that are causing a significant shift in the delivery and management of built assets. When deployed...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Collaboration Enables Innovative Timber Structure Adoption in Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2007
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Gosselin, Annie
Blanchet, Pierre
Lehoux, Nadia
Cimon, Yan
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Supply Chain
Construction
Prefabrication
Procurement
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
ISSN
2075-5309
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

A Study of the Viability of Cross Laminated Timber for Residential Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2358
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Author
Smyth, Max
Publisher
KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Sweden
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Residential Buildings
Construction
Sustainability
Carbon
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report presents an overview into cross laminated timber (CLT) as a construction material and how it compares to traditional methods of construction. CLT is also examined in the context of a move to off-site manufacturing (OSM) and a greater emphasis on sustainability in the construction sector. In this context it is found to perform well with mass timber products such as CLT being the only carbon negative building materials capable of building mid and high-rise buildings. The barriers and opportunities for CLT are explored looking at literature, industry reports and case studies. The main barriers to wider use of CLT still come from uncertainties around the material. Although they have been proven to not be a problem, worries over issues such as how it performs during fires and the lifetime of buildings persist. A lack of standardisation may be the primary cause for this as a range of products and specifications across different manufactures and countries creates confusion and means that each building needs to be individually specified. The opportunities identified for CLT include its carbon saving properties which could benefit governments wanting to reach their carbon reduction targets. In addition, the ability to use CLT on a wider range of sites such as unstable brownfield land and over service tunnels lends to its strength in aiding with urban densification. In terms of costs, these are found to be comparable to those of traditional construction methods with high material costs being offset by reduced foundations and construction time. CLT buildings do, however, face a premium in insurance costs. Transport costs, resulting from a concentrated production base in central Europe, also add a considerable amount to the overall cost of the finished product. This in turn encourages domestic production in countries outside of Europe. The possibilities for CLT in the UK residential construction market are investigated with a focus on mid-rise and high-rise flat construction as that is what the economics and material properties of CLT most lend itself to. Although CLT currently has a low market share of less than 0.1% of homes in this sector there is the potential for this to increase to 20-60% over time. The lower range of this estimate is not predicted to be reached before 2035 and this is also dependant on rising CLT production levels. The volume of timber that is needed to manufacture enough CLT to reach these increased construction volumes can be sourced sustainably from existing forests production in Europe and North America. In addition, the UK has enough excess timber harvesting capacity to provide for the entirety of CLT buildings in the UK, however, large scale domestic CLT production is required to make this a reality.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.