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49 records – page 1 of 5.

The Economic and Emissions Benefits of Engineered Wood Products in a Low-Carbon Future

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2351
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems

Identifying Mass Timber Research Priorities, Barriers to Adoption and Engineering, Procurement and Construction Challenges In Canada

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2372
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Market and Adoption
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Syed, Taha
Publisher
University of Toronto
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Mass Timber
Barriers
Research Priorities
Challenges
Construction
Engineering
Procurement
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Mass timber construction in Canada is in the spotlight and emerging as a sustainable building system that offers an opportunity to optimize the value of every tree harvested and to revitalize a declining forest industry, while providing climate mitigation solutions. Little research has been conducted, however, to identify the mass timber research priorities of end users, barriers to adoption and engineering, procurement and construction challenges in Canada. This study helps bridge these gaps. The study also created an interactive, three-dimensional GIS map displaying mass timber projects across North America, as an attempt to offer a helpful tool to practitioners, researchers and students, and fill a gap in existing knowledge sharing. The study findings, based on a web-based survey of mass timber end users, suggest the need for more research on (a) total project cost comparisons with concrete and steel, (b) hybrid systems and (c) mass timber building construction methods and guidelines. The most important barriers for successful adoption are (a) misconceptions about mass timber with respect to fire and building longevity, (b) high and uncertain insurance premiums, (c) higher cost of mass timber products compared to concrete and steel, and (d) resistance to changing from concrete and steel. In terms of challenges: (a) building code compliance and regulations, (b) design permits and approvals, and (c) insufficient design experts in the market are rated by study participants as the most pressing “engineering” challenge. The top procurement challenges are (a) too few manufactures and suppliers, (b) long distance transportation, and (c) supply and demand gaps. The most important construction challenges are (a) inadequate skilled workforce, (b) inadequate specialized subcontractors, and (c) excessive moisture exposure during construction.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Use of Timber for the Sustainable City Growth and its Role in the Climate Change

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2386
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Hamadyk, E
Amado, M
de Brito, J
Publisher
IOP Publishing Ltd
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Sustainability
Embodied Carbon
Carbon Emissions
Construction
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science
Summary
According to the predictions of United Nations (2017) there are more than 7 billion people on Earth and this number will reach 9.7 billion by 2050. Today, most of the population lives in the urban areas and the rapid growth entails more construction in a housing sector. Since the industrial revolution the world has experienced countless technological attainments and on the other hand risky increase in natural resources use, energy consumption, greenhouse gases emission, ozone depletion, toxification and global temperature rising. The question how the cities can respond to urban growth is related to the sustainable goals of Agenda 2030. This research discusses potential of the usage of timber as construction material and it also brings the answer to this question. The wood is 100% renewable, recyclable and nontoxic material with capacity to absorb CO2 and perform low embodied energy. The increase of timber use in the construction contributes to sustainable development and to the reduction of waste, CO2 emission, as well as energy consumption. The aim of this paper is to discuss the advantages of using timber as a sustainable solution in urban context, in comparison with most commonly used concrete. The findings demonstrate the value of timber as sustainable construction material.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Environmental Impacts of Building Construction Using Cross-laminated Timber Panel Construction Method: A Case of the Research Building in Kyushu, Japan

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2412
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

A Methodological Approach for Structural Health Monitoring of Mass-Timber Buildings Under Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2519
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Serviceability
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Mass Timber Buildings and the IBC

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2614
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
American Wood Council
International Code Council
Publisher
ICC
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Building Code
Mass Timber
Structural
Fire Protection
Construction
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
ISBN
978-1-952468-02-5
Summary
Developed by ICC and American Wood Council, this first edition provides an overview of requirements for mass timber construction as found in the 2021 International Building Code® (IBC®). The document reviews the 2015 IBC’s recognition of cross-laminated timber (CLT), the reorganization of heavy timber provisions in the 2018 IBC, followed by the historic changes in the 2021 IBC and International Fire Code® (IFC®) for tall mass timber construction. The 2021 IBC and IFC include important changes in material technologies and their expanded use as proposed by the ICC Ad Hoc Committee on Tall Wood Buildings. Three new types of construction (Types IV-A, IV-B and IV-C) defined and included in the 2021 codes allow the use of mass timber for buildings of taller heights, more stories above grade, and greater allowable areas compared to existing provisions for heavy timber buildings. Features: More than 100 full-color photos, illustrations and tables enhance comprehension and help users visualize requirements Content accurately reflects mass timber provisions in the 2015, 2018 and 2021 IBC, and 2021 IFC “Change Significance” topics reinforce the content and offer helpful background regarding code provisions Results are provided for five fire tests in a fully furnished structure constructed to simulate Types IV-A, IV-B and IV-C Detailed examples facilitate comprehension of code application and methods of determining code compliance Application of energy, sound transmission, structural loads, and other code provisions to mass timber construction 50 practice questions to help users prepare for ICC certification exams This is an incredibly valuable and time-saving reference for architects, engineers, building/fire officials and inspectors.
Online Access
Payment Required
Resource Link
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Petawawa Research Forest Centennial Bridge

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1919
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Application
Bridges and Spans
Author
Koo, Kenneth
Prevost, Glen
Pineau, John
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Road Bridge
Construction
Culvert System
Engineered Wood Product (EWP)
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The Petawawa Research Forest (PRF) was established in 1918 and is the oldest research forest in Canada. It is located along Highway 17, east of Chalk River, Ontario, and is part of Garrison Petawawa under the jurisdiction of the Department of National Defence. By special agreement, it is managed by the Canadian Wood Fibre Centre, under the Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada. The research undertaken at the PRF influences forest policy, industry, silvicultural practices, and private forest management practices across the country. Operational commercial harvests also occur at the PRF. Meridian Road is an access road at the PRF and leads to research, forest management, and recreational sites. A multi-cell culvert system at Young’s Creek recently failed (bottom left), and the crossing needed large-scale maintenance to allow the continued movement of logging trucks, vehicles, and research teams. The culvert failure negatively impacted water flow and habitat. To rectify these issues, a modern, single-lane engineered wood product (EWP) bridge, named Centennial Bridge (bottom right), was installed and built by Corington Engineering Inc., of Renfrew, Ontario. The experience at the PRF is of interest to sustainable forest licence (SFL) holders (and municipalities) looking to gain more knowledge about the construction and design of EWP access road bridges. The goal of this case study was to highlight the main construction and design details of Centennial Bridge and draw some comparisons to conventional steel-logging road bridges.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Solutions for Upper Mid-Rise and High-Rise Mass Timber Construction: Infrared Imaging for Fire Risks

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2090
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Fire
Site Construction Management
Application
Wood Building Systems

Monitoring Moisture Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber Building Elements during Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2102
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Site Construction Management
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Design Options for Three- and Four-Storey Wood School Buildings in British Columbia

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2373
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bevilacqua, Nick
Dickof, Carla
Wolfe, Ray
Gan, Wei-Jie
Embury-Williams, Lynn
Organization
Fast + Epp
Wood Works! BC
Thinkspace
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Construction
Education
School Buildings
Mass Timber
Multi-Storey
Building Code
Fire Protection
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This study illustrates the range of possible wood construction approaches for school buildings that are up to four storeys in height. As land values continue to rise, particularly in higher-density urban environments, schools with smaller footprints will become increasingly more necessary to satisfy enrollment demands. There are currently a number of planned new school projects throughout British Columbia that anticipate requiring either three-or four-storey buildings, and it is forecasted that the demand for school buildings of this size will continue to rise. This study is closely related to the report Risk Analysis and Alternative Solution for Three- and Four-Storey Schools of Mass Timber and/or Wood-Frame Construction prepared by GHL Consultants, which explores the building code related considerations of wood construction for school buildings that are up to four storeys in height. Though wood construction offers a viable structural material option for these buildings, the British Columbia Building Code (BCBC 2018) currently limits schools comprised of wood construction to a maximum of two storeys, while also imposing limits on the overall floor area. As such, the reader is referred to the GHL report for further information regarding building code compliance (with a particular emphasis on fire protection) for wood school buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

49 records – page 1 of 5.