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1917 records – page 1 of 192.

Pinching Effect on Seismic Performance of a SDOF Lightframe Timber Structure

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2542
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Eini, Ariya
Zhou, Lina
Ni, Chun
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Pinching Behavior
Energy Dissipation
Hysteresis Loop
Light-frame wood
IDA Analysis
SDOF System
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Although energy dissipation is one of the key factors in resisting seismic force, current design codes only take into account the ductility of the backbone properties of hysteresis curves, and the energy dissipation is usually not accounted for. This paper focuses on understanding and assessing the influence of energy dissipation due to different pinching levels on the seismic performance of a light-frame wood shear wall system. Timber structures with identical backbone curves but different pinching levels were analyzed. Incremental dynamic analyses were run on a single-degreeof-freedom system with varying pinching stiffness and residual strength. The seismic evaluation is presented by the spectral accelerations causing failure of the structure and the hysteresis energy dissipation under a suite of 22 ground motions (2 components per motion) over a wide range of fundamental periods of typical timber structures. Results show that the effect of pinching on the seismic performance of timber structures is period-dependent. Short period structures are more sensitive to the pinching of hysteresis loops compared to long period structures. The residual strength of pinching loops has a greater influence on the seismic performance than the stiffness of the pinching loops. Hysteretic energy dissipation derived from standard reversed-cyclic tests can provide a better understanding on the seismic resistance of timber structures. However, the hysteretic energy under a seismic event at near-collapse stage neither agrees with quasistatic cyclic test’s energy dissipation nor is well correlated to the maximum seismic capacity of the structure.
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Predicting the Human-Induced Vibration of Cross Laminated Timber Floor Under Multi-Person Loadings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2701
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Wang, Chang
Chang, Wen-Shao
Yan, Weiming
Huang, Haoyu
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Human-Induced Vibration
Multi-Person Loadings
Numerical Modelling
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Structures
Summary
The vibration of cross laminated timber (CLT) floor is closely related to human-induced loadings. However, research and prediction approaches regarding human-induced vibration of the CLT floor have been mostly limited to a single-person excitation condition. This paper presents new prediction approaches to the vibration response of the CLT floor under multi-person loadings. The effect of multi-person loadings on the vibration performance of a CLT floor was investigated through numerical modelling, experimental testing and analytical investigation. A finite element model was developed through a computational software to perform an accurate analysis of human-induced loadings. An analytical model was established to predict human-induced vibration of the CLT floor under multi-person loadings. Experimental tests were conducted to validate the numerical modelling. Results of both numerical modelling and experimental testing showed that the vibration performance of the CLT floor under multi-person loadings was almost double that under single-person loadings. Thus, multi-person activities are more likely to cause the occupants feelings of discomfort. A method for predicting the human-induced vibration of the CLT floor under multi-person loadings was then developed. The measured response, numerical modelled response, and predicted response were compared using an existing design metric, vibration dose value (VDV). The results were largely consistent. It is therefore concluded that the proposed prediction method will enable engineers to design timber floor systems that consider multi-person loadings.
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Analysis of Cost Comparison and Effects of Change Orders During Construction: Study of a Mass Timber and a Concrete Building Project

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2730
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Ahmed, Shafayet
Arocho, Ingrid
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Cost
Keywords
Concrete Building
Cost Assessment
Change Orders
Construction
Cost Comparative Analysis
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Building Engineering
Summary
In recent years, timber has been considered as an alternative source of building material because of its sustainability and design efficiency. However, the cost competitiveness of timber buildings is still under study due to the lack of available cost information. This paper presents a comprehensive cost comparative analysis of a mass timber building mainly developed with cross-laminated timber (CLT). The actual construction cost of the project is compared with the modeled cost of the same building designed as a concrete option. The result shows that the construction cost of timber building is 6.43% higher than the modeled concrete building. The study further investigated the change orders associated with the project and found that the total cost of change orders contributed 5.62% to the final construction cost of mass timber building. The study is helpful to provide insight into the construction cost of typical mass timber buildings. It also can be used as a guide for the project owners to make decisions regarding their initial investments on a mass timber project.
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Variations of Moisture Content in Manufacturing CLT-Concrete Composite Slab Using Wet Construction Method

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2732
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Song, Yo-Jin
Baek, Seong-Yeob
Lee, In-Hwan
Hong, Soon-Il
Publisher
North Carolina State University
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Wet Construction Method
Moisture Content
Teak
Composite
Adhesive
Delamination
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
BioResources
Summary
Construction of eco-friendly high-rise buildings using cross-laminated timber (CLT)-concrete composite (CCC) slabs is increasing. CLT and concrete, which are major component materials of the CCC slab, are significantly affected by moisture. In particular, the moisture content of concrete in the production process affects the quality of both materials. In this study, the effects of the wet construction method on CLT and concrete component materials are examined by monitoring the behavior of the CCC slab during curing time (28 d) and by evaluating the quality of the concrete and CLT after curing. When manufacturing the CCC using the wet construction method, moisture penetration from the concrete into the CLT during the curing time is suppressed by the shear bonding between the concrete and the CLT when an adhesive is used. This minimizes the effect of the moisture on both component materials, consequently yielding uniform compressive strength to the concrete after curing and preventing the deterioration of the CLT’s delamination performance. Therefore, the shear bonding method using an adhesive is expected to minimize the quality deterioration observed in concrete and CLT after curing.
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Experimental Investigation on the Long-Term Behaviour of Prefabricated Timber-Concrete Composite Beams with Steel Plate Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2741
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Connections
Serviceability
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Author
Shi, Benkai
Liu, Weiqing
Yang, Huifeng
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Topic
Connections
Serviceability
Keywords
TCC
Prefabrication
Steel Plate
Long-term Behaviour
Interface Slip
Loading
Shear Connections
Deflection
Temperature
Humidity
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
This paper presents the results of long-term experiments performed on three timber-concrete composite (TCC) beams. An innovative fabricated steel plate connection system, which consists of screws and steel plates embedded in concrete slabs, was adopted in the TCC beam specimens. The adopted shear connection can provide dry-type connection for TCC beams. Steel plates were embedded in concrete slabs while the concrete slab was constructed in factories. The timber beam and concrete slab can be assembled together using screws at the construction site. In this experimental programme, the beam specimens were subjected to constant loading for 613 days in indoor uncontrolled environments. The influence of long-term loading levels and the number of shear connections on the long-term performance of TCC beams was investigated and discussed. The mid-span deflection, timber strain, and interface relative slip at the positions of both connections and beam-ends were recorded throughout the long-term tests. It was found the long-term deflection of the TCC beam increased by approximately 60% while the long-term loads were doubled. Under the influence of the variable temperature and humidity, the TCC specimens with 8 shear connections showed slighter fluctuations compared with the TCC beam with 6 shear connections. In the 613-day observation period, the maximum deflection increment recorded was 6.56 mm for the specimen with eight shear connections and 20% loading level. A rheological model consisting of two Kelvin bodies was employed to fit the curves of creep coefficients. The final deflections predicted of all specimens at the end of 50-year service life were 2.1~2.7 times the initial deflections caused by the applied loads. All beam specimens showed relative small increments in mid-span deflection, strain and relative slip over time without any degradations, demonstrating the excellent long-term performance of TCC beams using the innovative steel plate connection system, which is also easily fabricated.
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Structural Performance of a Hybrid Timber Wall System for Emergency Housing Facilities

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2745
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Casagrande, Daniele
Sinito, Ester
Izzi, Matteo
Pasetto, Gaia
Polastri, Andrea
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Prefabrication
Modular
Emergency Housing
Temporary Building
Hybrid Timber Frame
Seismic Behaviour
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Building Engineering
Summary
This paper presents an innovative and sustainable timber constructive system that could be used as an alternative to traditional emergency housing facilities. The system proposed in this study is composed of prefabricated modular elements that are characterized by limited weight and simple assembly procedures, which represent strategic advantages when it comes facing a strong environmental disaster (e.g. an earthquake). The complete dismantling of structural elements and foundations is granted thanks to specific details and an innovative connection system called X-Mini, capable of replacing traditional anchoring devices (i.e. hold downs and angle brackets) by resisting both shear and tension loads. This constructive system, denoted as Hybrid Timber Frame (HTF), takes advantage of the strong prefabrication, reduced weight of light-frame timber systems, and of the excellent strength properties of the Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) panels. Specifically, the solid-timber members typically used in the structural elements of light-frame systems are replaced by CLT linear elements. The results of experimental tests and numerical simulations are critically presented and discussed, giving a detailed insight into the performance of the HTF under seismic conditions.
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Hardwood CLT Program in Southern and Central Ontario

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2762
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Li, Xincheng
Publisher
University of Toronto
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Keywords
Manufacturing
Hardwood
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a large prefabricated solid engineering plank made of multiple layers of planks glued together and it is primarily used in structures such as the floors, walls, and roofs of buildings. ANSI/APA PRG 320 is the world recognized CLT lumber production standard, and the main raw material of CLT has always been softwood rather than hardwood. However, the bending strength, compressive strength, and shear strength of hardwood CLT lumber are stronger than softwood CLT lumber. The large and underutilized hardwood resources in central and southern Ontario provide a huge resource advantage for the hardwood CLT project. This article uses the Cost-Benefit Assessments model to assess the feasibility of investing in hardwood CLT plants in central and southern Ontario. The results show that the payback period of the hardwood CLT factory is 5 years, and the rate of return on investment of 10 years, 15 years, and 20 years are all-around 11%. This study could strengthen investor confidence and it also identifies the direction for the development of hardwood CLT plants in central and southern Ontario.
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Finite-Element-Based Prediction of Moisture-Induced Crack Patterns for Cross Sections of Solid Wood and Glued Laminated Timber Exposed to a Realistic Climate Condition

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2764
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Autengruber, Maximilian
Lukacevic, Markus
Gröstlinger, Christof
Füssl, Josef
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Keywords
Eurocode 5
Finite Element Simulation
Finite Element Method (FEM)
Failure
Cracks
Load Bearing Capacity
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
Moisture may significantly influence the dimensions and behavior of wooden elements and, thus, it is important to consider within both serviceability as well as ultimate limit state designs. Dimensional changes, also called swelling (during wetting) and shrinkage (during drying), are non-uniform due to the direction-dependent expansion coefficients of wood and usually lead to eigenstresses. If these exceed certain strength values, cracking may occur, which reduces the resistance to external loads, especially to shear stresses. The current standard Eurocode 5 takes these circumstances very simplified into account, by so-called service classes, defined based on the surrounding climate and average moisture levels over the course of a year. Accordingly, reduction factors for strength values and cross section widths are assigned. For a better understanding of the climate-induced changes in wooden beams, we exposed 18 different beams with varying cross sections to a representative climate of Linz, Austria, within the framework of a finite element simulation and investigated the resulting moisture fields and crack patterns. For this purpose, expansions and linear-elastic stresses were simulated by using the thermal and moisture fields obtained in the first simulation step and expansion coefficients. Using a multisurface failure criterion, two critical points in time were determined for each cross section, at which advanced crack simulations were carried out using the extended finite element method. The resulting crack lengths showed that the Eurocode 5 assumption of a linear relationship between crack-free and total width could be verified for both drying and wetting cases. In future, the obtained crack patterns might also be used to investigate the actual reduction of load-bearing capacities of such cross sections, since the position of a crack and, for example, the maximum shear stress may not coincide. For the first time in this work, a consistent concept is presented to estimate the resulting crack formation in a wooden element from any moisture load based on a mechanical well-founded simulation concept. For this reason, this work is intended to lay a basis for a more accurate consideration of climate-related loads on wooden elements up to timber constructions.
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Cyclic Response of Insulated Steel Angle Brackets Used for Cross-Laminated Timber Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2765
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Seismic
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Kržan, Meta
Azinovic, Boris
Publisher
Springer
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Seismic
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Keywords
Angle Bracket
Sound Insulation
Insulation
Monotonic Test
Cyclic Tests
Wall-to-Floor
Stiffness
Load Bearing Capacity
Shear
Tensile
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
European Journal of Wood and Wood Products
Summary
In cross-laminated timber (CLT) buildings, in order to reduce the disturbing transmission of sound over the flanking parts, special insulation layers are used between the CLT walls and slabs, together with insulated angle-bracket connections. However, the influence of such CLT connections and insulation layers on the seismic resistance of CLT structures has not yet been studied. In this paper, experimental investigation on CLT panels installed on insulation bedding and fastened to the CLT floor using an innovative, insulated, steel angle bracket, are presented. The novelty of the investigated angle-bracket connection is, in addition to the sound insulation, its resistance to both shear as well as uplift forces as it is intended to be used instead of traditional angle brackets and hold-down connections to simplify the construction. Therefore, monotonic and cyclic tests on the CLT wall-to-floor connections were performed in shear and tensile/compressive load direction. Specimens with and without insulation under the angle bracket and between the CLT panels were studied and compared. Tests of insulated specimens have proved that the insulation has a marginal influence on the load-bearing capacity; however, it significantly influences the stiffness characteristics. In general, the experiments have shown that the connection could also be used for seismic resistant CLT structures, although some minor improvements should be made.
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Three-Dimensional Numerical Calculation Model for Static Behavior Simulation of Cross-Laminated Timber Plates under Thermal Environment

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2766
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Hu, Wenliang
Hou, Wei
Zhu, Zhao
Huang, Xuhui
Publisher
Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Finite Element Method (FEM)
Thermal Behaviour
Thermal Environment
Deformation
Load Bearing Capacity
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Mathematical Problems in Engineering
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is well known as an interesting technical and economical product for modern wood structures. The use of CLT for modern construction industry has become increasingly popular in particular for residential timber buildings. Analyzing the CLT behavior in high thermal environment has attracted scholars’ attention. Thermal environment greatly influences the CLT properties and load bearing capacity of CLT, and the investigation can form the basis for predicting the structural response of such CLT-based structures. In the present work, the finite element method (FEM) is employed to analyze the thermal influence on the deformation of CLT. Furthermore, several factors were taken into consideration, including board layer number, hole conformation, and hole position, respectively. In order to determine the influence, several numerical models for different calculation were established. The calculation process was validated by comparing with published data. The performance is quantified by demonstrating the temperature distribution and structural deformation.
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1917 records – page 1 of 192.