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1861 records – page 1 of 187.

North American Mass Timber: State of the Industry

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1963
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application

Bonding Performance of Adhesive Systems for Cross-Laminated Timber Treated with Micronized Copper Azole Type C (MCA-C)

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2200
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Author
Lim, Hyungsuk
Tripathi, Sachin
Tang, Juliet
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Keywords
Preservatives
Micronized Copper Azole-Type C
Bonding Performance
Delamination Tests
Block Shear Tests
Adhesives
Block Shear Strength
Wood Failure Percentage
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
The feasibility of manufacturing cross-laminated timber (CLT) from southern yellow pine (United States grown) treated with micronized copper azole type C (MCA-C) preservative was evaluated. Lumber (2x6 visually graded no. 2 boards) was treated to two retention levels (1.0 and 2.4 kg/m3 ), planed to a thickness of 35 mm, and assembled along with an untreated control group using three adhesive systems following product specifications: melamine formaldehyde (MF), resorcinol formaldehyde (RF), and one-component polyurethane (PUR). Block shear and delamination tests were conducted to examine the bonding performance in accordance with ASTM D905 and ASTM D2559 Standards, respectively. One-way analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis H test were conducted to evaluate the effects of preservative retention and adhesive type on block shear strength (BSS) and wood failure percentage (WFP). Regardless of adhesive type, the 1.0 kg/m3 retention treatment significantly lowered BSS compared to the untreated control. CLT composed of the laminations treated at 2.4 kg/m3 maintained BSS when PUR and RF were used but not MF. The average WFP of each CLT configuration ranged from 89% to 99%. The untreated CLT specimens did not experience any delamination under accelerated weathering cycles. The delamination rates of the treated specimens assembled using MF and RF increased with the preservative retention level, while PUR provided delamination rates less than 1% to the laminations treated at both levels. These combined data suggest that, under the conditions tested, PUR provided overall better bonding performance than MF and RF for MCA-C treated wood.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Methods for Practice-Oriented Linear Analysis in Seismic Design of Cross Laminated Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2304
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application

The Economic and Emissions Benefits of Engineered Wood Products in a Low-Carbon Future

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2351
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application

Predicting Failure of Notched Cross-Laminated Timber Plates Including the Effect of Environmental Stresses

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2354
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Author
Nairn, John
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Delamination
Fracture Mechanisms
Residual Stresses
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood Material Science & Engineering
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Risk of Moisture in Diffusionally Open Roofs with Cross-Laminated Timber for Northern Coastal Climates

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2355
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Roofs
Author
Sadlowska-Salega, Agnieszka
Was, Krzysztof
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Roofs
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Moisture Condensation
Critical Moisture Content
Diffusively Open
Hygrothermal Calculation
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Identifying Mass Timber Research Priorities, Barriers to Adoption and Engineering, Procurement and Construction Challenges In Canada

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2372
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Syed, Taha
Publisher
University of Toronto
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Mass Timber
Barriers
Research Priorities
Challenges
Construction
Engineering
Procurement
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Mass timber construction in Canada is in the spotlight and emerging as a sustainable building system that offers an opportunity to optimize the value of every tree harvested and to revitalize a declining forest industry, while providing climate mitigation solutions. Little research has been conducted, however, to identify the mass timber research priorities of end users, barriers to adoption and engineering, procurement and construction challenges in Canada. This study helps bridge these gaps. The study also created an interactive, three-dimensional GIS map displaying mass timber projects across North America, as an attempt to offer a helpful tool to practitioners, researchers and students, and fill a gap in existing knowledge sharing. The study findings, based on a web-based survey of mass timber end users, suggest the need for more research on (a) total project cost comparisons with concrete and steel, (b) hybrid systems and (c) mass timber building construction methods and guidelines. The most important barriers for successful adoption are (a) misconceptions about mass timber with respect to fire and building longevity, (b) high and uncertain insurance premiums, (c) higher cost of mass timber products compared to concrete and steel, and (d) resistance to changing from concrete and steel. In terms of challenges: (a) building code compliance and regulations, (b) design permits and approvals, and (c) insufficient design experts in the market are rated by study participants as the most pressing “engineering” challenge. The top procurement challenges are (a) too few manufactures and suppliers, (b) long distance transportation, and (c) supply and demand gaps. The most important construction challenges are (a) inadequate skilled workforce, (b) inadequate specialized subcontractors, and (c) excessive moisture exposure during construction.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Smart Manufacturing of Curved Mass Timber Components by Self-shaping

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2379
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Grönquist, Philippe
Publisher
ETH Zurich
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Thesis
Material
Timber (unspecified)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Manufacturing
Mass Timber
Up-scaling
Form-stable Curved Elements
Self-Shaping
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Notes
DOI link: https://doi.org/10.3929/ethz-b-000405617
Summary
With the rise of complex and free-form timber architecture enabled by digital design and fabrication, timber manufacturing companies increasingly need to produce curved components. In this thesis, a novel approach for the manufacturing of curved timber building components is proposed and analyzed. Following biological role models such as the bending of pine cone scales, a smart way to curve wood at large-scale is given by the biomimetic concept of bi-layered laminated wood. This principle enables large programmed material deformations upon controlled moisture content change. The main objectives of this thesis are the in-depth understanding of the mechanics of self-shaping wood bilayers and the up-scaling of the already known principle from the laboratory to the industrial scale in order to enable an application as form-stable curved elements in architecture. Hereby, the main challenges addressed are the accurate prediction of shape-change in terms of the natural variability in wood material parameters, the scale-dependent impact of moisture gradients on mechanical behavior, and the influence of wood-specific time- and moisture-dependent deformation mechanisms such as creep or mechano-sorption in the shaping process. Major impacts of these aspects on the shaping behavior could be demonstrated by the use of continuum-mechanical material models adapted to wood, both in the form of analytical and numerical models. Based on the gained insight, the up-scaling process to industrial manufacturing was successfully made possible. A collaborative project realized in 2019, the 14 m high Urbach tower, is presented as a proof of concept for application and competitiveness of the novel biomimetic method for production of curved mass timber components. Furthermore, next to self-shaping by bending to single-curved components, possibilities and limitations for achieving double-curved structures using wood bilayers in a gridshell configuration are analyzed and discussed.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Comparison of Carbon Footprints: Mass Timber Buildings vs Steels – A Literature Review

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2380
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Cooney, Emily
Publisher
Lakehead University
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Sustainability
Carbon Footprint
Mass Timber
Steel
Greenhouse Gases
Climate Change
Engineered Wood Product (EWP)
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Sustainability and innovation are key components in the fight against climate change. Mass timber buildings have been gaining popularity due to the renewable nature of timber. Although research comparing mass timber buildings to more mainstream buildings such as steel is still in the early stages and therefore, limited. We are looking to determine the difference between carbon footprints of mass timber and traditional steel and concrete buildings. This is done with the intention of determining the sustainability and practicality of mass timber buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Zero-Waste Mass-Timber Residential High-Rise: A Sustainable High-density Housing Solution

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2381
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Design and Systems
Material
Timber (unspecified)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
van Houten, Robert
Publisher
Delft University of Technology
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Thesis
Material
Timber (unspecified)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Design and Systems
Keywords
Mass Timber
Residential
High-Rise
End of Life
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
More and more people live in cities. The building industry is responsible for 33% of waste production and is set to increase further to 50% in 2025. The energy efficiency is continuously increased, but the waste production at the end of life of a building is largely ignored. This design proposes a solution in the form of a zero-waste high-rise design. It uses only recyclable or renewable materials. Mass-timber is chosen as the main material as it is not only renewable and easily reusable, it is also a storage of CO2. The design reuses the foundation of existing buildings, and with the lightweight properties of mass-timber, increases the density on the location by building taller. The design is four times taller as the current buildings. To allow for sustainable densification, the design offers public and collective qualities. The building has been designed is such a way to be easily refitted during its life cycle or to be completely disassembled at the end of life.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

1861 records – page 1 of 187.