Skip header and navigation

Refine Results By

590 records – page 1 of 59.

Experimental Behavior of a Continuous Metal Connector for a Wood-Concrete Composite System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue730
Year of Publication
2004
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Floors
Author
Clouston, Peggi
Civjan, Scott
Bathon, Leander
Publisher
Forest Products Society
Year of Publication
2004
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Pine
US
Continuous Steel Mesh
Steel Connectors
Push-Out Tests
Shear Strength
Stiffness
Bending Tests
Research Status
Complete
Series
Forest Products Journal
Summary
The benefits of using shear connectors to join wood beams to a concrete slab in a composite floor or deck system are many. Studies throughout the world have demonstrated significantly improved strength, stiffness, and ductility properties from such connection systems as well as citing practical building advantages such as durability, sound insulation, and fire resistance. In this study, one relatively new shear connector system that originated in Germany has been experimentally investigated for use with U.S. manufactured products. The connector system consists of a continuous steel mesh of which one half is glued into a southern pine Parallam® Parallel Strand Lumber beam and the other half embedded into a concrete slab to provide minimal interlayer slip. A variety of commercial epoxies were tested for shear strength and stiffness in standard shear or “push out” tests. The various epoxies resulted in a variety of shear constitutive behaviors; however, for two glue types,shear failure occurred in the steel connector resulting in relatively high initial stiffness and ductility as well as good repeatability. Slip moduli and ultimate strength values are presented and discussed. Full-scale bending tests, using the best performing adhesive as determined from the shear tests, were also conducted. Results indicate consistent, near-full composite action system behavior.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Systems in Timber Engineering: Loadbearing Structures and Component Layers

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2115
Year of Publication
2008
Topic
Design and Systems
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Kolb, Josef
Editor
Lignum - Holzwirtschaft Schweiz
DGfH - German Society of Wood Research
Publisher
Birkhäuser Basel
Year of Publication
2008
Format
Book/Guide
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Load Bearing
Construction
Timber Construction
Timber Preservation
Building Systems
Loadbearing Structure
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Timber construction has become completely modernized. It has gained considerably in market share with respect to competing building materials and is dominated by systems such as frame and solid timber construction. Every timber construction is determined by its structure. Hence it is essential to know the connections and relationships from the design stage right through to the construction phase. Systems in Timber Engineering takes a whole new approach to this subject. It is a comprehensive, analytical, and visually organized treatment, from the simple single-family house to the large-scale multistore structure. It includes the building envelope, which is so important for saving energy, and systems for ceilings and interior dividing walls, which are so essential from the vantage point of construction. This work uses plans, schematic drawings, and pictures to show the current and forward-looking state of the technology as applied in Switzerland, a leading country in the field of timber construction.
Online Access
Payment Required
Resource Link
Less detail

Lateral Load Resisting Systems for Engineered Wood Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2637
Year of Publication
2009
Topic
Design and Systems
Wind
Seismic
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Author
Popovski, Marjan
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2009
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Topic
Design and Systems
Wind
Seismic
Keywords
Lateral Load Resisting System
Construction
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The main sources of lateral loads on buildings are either strong winds or earthquakes. These lateral forces are resisted by the buildings’ Lateral Load Resisting Systems (LLRSs). Adequate design of these systems is of paramount importance for the structural behaviour in general. Basic procedures for design of buildings subjected to lateral loads are provided in national and international model building codes. Additional lateral load design provisions can be found in national and international material design standards. The seismic and wind design provisions for engineered wood structures in Canada need to be enhanced to be compatible with those available for other materials such as steel and concrete. Such design provisions are of vital importance for ensuring a competitive position of timber structures relative to reinforced concrete and steel structures. In this project a new design Section on Lateral Load Resisting Systems was drafted and prepared for future implementation in CSA O86, the Canadian Standard for Engineering Design in Wood. The new Section was prepared based on gathering existing research information on the behaviour of various structural systems used in engineered wood construction around the world as well as developing in-house research information by conducting experimental tests and analytical studies on structural systems subjected to lateral loads. This section for the first time tried to link the system behaviour to that of the connections in the system. Although the developed Section could not have been implemented in CSA O86 in its entirety during the latest code cycle that ended in 2008, the information it contains will form the foundation for future development of technical polls for implementation in the upcoming editions of CSA O86. Some parts of the developed Section were implemented in the 2009 edition of CSA O86 as five separate technical polls. The most important technical poll was the one on Special Seismic Design Considerations for Shearwalls and Diaphragms. This technical poll for the first time in North America includes partial capacity design procedures for wood buildings, and represents a significant step forward towards implementing full capacity-based seismic design procedures for wood structures. Implementation of these design procedures also eliminated most of the confusion and hurdles related to the design of wood-based diaphragms according to 2005 National Building Code of Canada. In other polls, the limit for use of unblocked shearwalls in CSA O86 was raised to 4.8 m, and based on the test results conducted during the project, the NLGA SPS3 fingerjoined studs were allowed to be used as substitutes for regular dimension lumber studs in shearwall applications in engineered buildings in Canada. With the US being the largest export market for the Canadian forest products industry, participation at code development committees in the field of structural and wood engineering in the US is of paramount importance. As a result of extensive activities during this project, for the first time one of the AF&PA Special Design Provisions for Wind and Seismic includes design values for unblocked shearwalls that were implemented based on FPInnovations’ research results. In addition, the project leader was involved in various aspects related to the NEESWood project in the US, in part of which a full scale six-storey wood-frame building will be tested at the E-Defense shake table in Miki, Japan in July 2009. Apart from being built from lumber and glued-laminated timber provided from Canada, the building will also feature the innovative Midply wood wall system that was also invented in Canada. The tests are expected to provide further technical evidence for increasing the height limits for platform frame construction in North America. Building construction - Design Earthquakes, Effect on building construction Glued joints - Finger Grading - Lumber Wind loads
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Innovative Engineered Timber Building Systems for Non-Residential Applications, Utilising Timber Concrete Composite Flooring Capable of Spanning Up to 8 to 10m

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1933
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Market and Adoption
Design and Systems
Cost
Environmental Impact
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Frames
Author
Crews, Keith
John, Stephen
Gerber, Christophe
Buchanan, Andrew
Smith, Tobias
Pampanin, Stefano
Publisher
Forest & Wood Products Australia
Year of Publication
2010
Format
Report
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Frames
Topic
Market and Adoption
Design and Systems
Cost
Environmental Impact
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Commercial
Non-Residential
New Zealand
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project has developed technologies for prefabricated structural systems constructed from engineered wood products for floors and building frames, suitable for buildings up to eight stories in height. The project included the design of a virtual multi-storey timber building, a review of commercial flooring systems, and the development of interim design procedures for timber concrete composite (TCC) floors. Compared with either solid concrete or timber floors, TCC floors provide an excellent balance between increased stiffness, reduced weight, better acoustic separation and good thermal mass. Outcomes from the project have confirmed TCC floors as a viable alternative to conventional flooring systems. The life cycle analysis of the virtual timber building has highlighted the potential advantages of timber-based building systems for commercial applications. The project also resulted in the formation of the Structural Timber Innovation Company, a research company that will continue to develop timber building systems in non-residential buildings in Australia and New Zealand.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Mechanical Properties of Laminated Veneer Lumber Beams Strengthened with CFRP Sheets

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2498
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Beams

Review and Survey on Differential Movement in Wood Frame Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2627
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Wang, J.
Ni, Chun
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2010
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Deformation
Mid-Rise
Shrinkage
Movement
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report summarizes the existing knowledge on building movement related to wood-frame construction. This knowledge includes fundamental causes and characteristics of wood shrinkage, instantaneous and time-dependent deformations under load, major wood-based materials used for construction and their shrinkage characteristics, movement amounts in publications based on limited field measurement, and movement estimations by construction practitioners based on their experience with wood-frame construction. Movement analysis and calculations were also demonstrated by focusing on wood shrinkage based on common engineering design assumptions, using six-storey platform buildings as examples. The report then provides engineering solutions for key building locations where differential movement could occur, based on the literature review as well as a small-scale survey of the construction industry. The report emphasizes the importance of comprehensive analysis during design and construction to accommodate differential movement. Most building materials move when subjected to loading or when environmental conditions change. It is always good practice to detail buildings so that they can accommodate a certain range of movement, whether due to structural loading, moisture or temperature changes. For wood-frame buildings, movement can be reduced by specifying materials with lower shrinkage rates, such as engineered wood products and drier lumber. However, this may add considerable costs to building projects, especially when specifications have to be met through customized orders. Producing lumber with a lower moisture content adds significant costs, given the additional energy consumption, lumber degrade and sorting requirements during kiln drying. Specifying materials with lower moisture content at time of delivery to job site does not guarantee that wood will not get wet during construction, and excessive shrinkage could still be caused by excessively long time of exposure to rain during construction. On the other hand, effective drying can occur during the period between lumber delivery and lumber closed into building assemblies. Appropriate measures should be taken to ensure lumber protection against wetting, protected panel fabrication on site, good construction sequence to facilitate air drying, and supplementary heating before closing in to improve wood drying. This report also provides recommendations for future work, including field measurement of movement and construction sequencing optimization, in order to provide better information for the design and construction of wood buildings, five- and six-storey platform frame buildings in particular.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Preliminary Assessment of Hygrothermal Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber Wall Assemblies Using Hygrothermal Models

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2628
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Moisture
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Wang, J.
Baldracchi, P.
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2010
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Moisture
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Keywords
Hygrothermal
Moisture Performance
Rainscreen
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Preliminary simulation was carried out using hygIRC and WUFI, both 1-D hygrothermal models, to analyze moisture performance of rainscreened wood-frame walls and cross-laminated timber (CLT) walls for the climates in Vancouver and Calgary. The major results are as follows. In order to provide baseline knowledge, preliminary comparisons between hygIRC and WUFI were conducted to investigate the effects of climate data, wall orientations and rain intrusion on the performance of the rainscreened wood-frame walls based on Vancouver’s climate. hygIRC tended to produce almost constant moisture content (MC) of the plywood sheathing throughout a year but WUFI showed greater variations, particularly when the ventilation of the rainscreen cavity was neglected. Rainscreen cavity ventilation provided dramatic drying potentials for wall assemblies based on the WUFI simulation. hygIRC indicated that east-facing walls had the highest moisture load, but the differences between orientations seemed negligible in WUFI when the rainscreen cavity ventilation was taken into account. When 1% of wind-driven rain was simulated as an additional moisture load, hygIRC suggested that the rainscreen walls could not dry out in Vancouver, WUFI, however, indicated that they could dry to a safe MC level in the summer. The discrepancies in material property data between the two models and between different databases in WUFI (even for the same wood species) were found to be very large. In terms of wood sorption data, large differences existed at near-saturated RH levels. This is a result of using pressure-plate/membrane methods for measuring material equilibrium moisture content (EMC) under high RH conditions. The EMC of wood at near-100% RH conditions measured with these methods can be higher than 200%, suggesting wood in construction would decay without liquid water intrusion or severe vapour condensation. The pressure-plate/membrane methods also appeared to be highly species-dependent, and have higher EMC at a certain RH level for less permeable species, from which it is relatively difficult to remove water during the measurement. The hygrothermal simulation in this work suggested that such a species bias caused by testing methods could put impermeable species (most Canadian species) at a disadvantage to permeable species like southern pine during related durability design of building assemblies. In terms of using CLT for construction in Vancouver and Calgary, the WUFI simulations suggested that the use of less permeable materials such as EPS (expanded polystyrene insulation), XPS (extruded polystyrene insulation), self-adhered bituminous membrane and polyethylene in wall assemblies reduced the ability of the walls to dry. On the other hand, permeable assemblies such as those using relatively permeable insulation like semi-rigid mineral wool (rock wool) as exterior insulation, instead of less permeable exterior insulation materials, would help walls dry. The simulation also suggested that using CLT products with initially low MC would significantly reduce moisture-related risks, which indicated the importance of protecting CLT and avoiding wetting during transportation and construction. In addition, the simulation found that indoor relative humidity (RH) conditions generated by the indoor RH prediction models included in hygIRC and WUFI varied greatly under the same basic climate and building conditions. The intermediate method specified in ASHRAE Standard 160 P resulted in long periods of saturated RH conditions throughout a year for the Vancouver climate, which may not be representative of ordinary residential buildings in Vancouver. The simulation in this study is preliminary and exploratory. It would be arbitrary to recommend one model over the other based on this report or use the simulation results directly for CLT wall assembly design without consultation with building science specialists. However, this work revealed more opportunities for close collaborations between the wood science and the building science communities. More work should be carried out to develop appropriate testing methods and assemble material property data for hygrothermal simulation of wood-based building assemblies. Model improvement and field verification are also strongly recommended, particularly for new building systems such as CLT constructions.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Manufacturing Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT): Technological and Economic Analysis

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2636
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)

Accommodating Movement in High-Rise Wood-Frame Building Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1875
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Other Materials
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Walls
Author
Howe, Richard
Publisher
Forest Products Society
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Journal Article
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Other Materials
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Keywords
Detailing
Shrinkage
Differential Movement
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood Design Focus
Summary
Ease of construction and favorable overall costs relative to other construction types are making high-rise (i.e., 4- and 5-story) wood frame construction increasingly popular. With these buildings increasing in height, there is a greater impetus on designers to address frame and finishes movement in such construction. As we all know, buildings are dynamic creatures experiencing a variety of movements during construction and over their service life. In wood frame construction, it is important to consider not only absolute movement but also differential movement between dissimilar materials. This article focuses on differential movement issues and how to recognize their potential and avoid problems by effective detailing.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Displacement-Based Seismic Design of Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1891
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Floors
Beams
Columns
Frames
Author
Loss, Cristiano
Publisher
University of Trento
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Floors
Beams
Columns
Frames
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Direct Displacement-Based Design
Direct-DBD
Full-Scale
Single Family Houses
Multi-Storey
Connections
Research Status
Complete
Notes
Doctoral Thesis (PhD)
Summary
The research is aimed at developing seismic methods for the design and evaluation of the seismic vulnerability of wooden structures, using a displacement-based approach. After a brief introduction on the seismic behaviour of timber structures, the general Direct Displacement-Based Design (Direct-DBD) procedure and the state-of-the-art are presented, with clear reference to the application of the Direct-DBD method to wooden buildings. The strength of the Direct-DBD method is its ability to design structures in a manner consistent with the level of damage expected, by directly relating the response and the expected performance of the structure. The research begins with a description of the procedural aspects of the Direct-DBD method and the parameters required for its application. The research presented focuses on the formulation of a displacement-based seismic design procedure, applicable to one-storey wooden structures made with a portal system. This typology is very common in Europe and particularly in Italy. A series of analytical expressions have been developed to calculate design parameters. The required analytical Direct-DBD parameters are implemented based on the mechanical behaviour of the connections, made with metal dowel-type fasteners. The calibration and subsequent validation of design parameters use a Monte Carlo numerical simulation and outcomes obtained by tests in full-scale. After the description of the Displacement-Based method for one-storey wooden structures, a series of guidelines to extend the Direct-DBD methodology to other types and categories of timber systems are proposed. The thesis presents the case of a multi-storey wood frame construction, which is a simple extension of the glulam portal frame system. Part of this work has been done within the RELUIS Project, (REte dei Laboratori Universitari di Ingegneria Sismica), Research Line IV, which in the years between 2005 and 2008 involved several Italian universities and Italian institutes of research in the development of new seismic design methods. The Project produced the first draft of model code for the seismic design of structures based on displacement (Direct-DBD). This thesis is the background to the section of the model code developed for timber structures.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

590 records – page 1 of 59.