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Preliminary Assessment of Hygrothermal Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber Wall Assemblies Using Hygrothermal Models

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2628
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Moisture
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Wang, J.
Baldracchi, P.
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2010
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Moisture
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Keywords
Hygrothermal
Moisture Performance
Rainscreen
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Preliminary simulation was carried out using hygIRC and WUFI, both 1-D hygrothermal models, to analyze moisture performance of rainscreened wood-frame walls and cross-laminated timber (CLT) walls for the climates in Vancouver and Calgary. The major results are as follows. In order to provide baseline knowledge, preliminary comparisons between hygIRC and WUFI were conducted to investigate the effects of climate data, wall orientations and rain intrusion on the performance of the rainscreened wood-frame walls based on Vancouver’s climate. hygIRC tended to produce almost constant moisture content (MC) of the plywood sheathing throughout a year but WUFI showed greater variations, particularly when the ventilation of the rainscreen cavity was neglected. Rainscreen cavity ventilation provided dramatic drying potentials for wall assemblies based on the WUFI simulation. hygIRC indicated that east-facing walls had the highest moisture load, but the differences between orientations seemed negligible in WUFI when the rainscreen cavity ventilation was taken into account. When 1% of wind-driven rain was simulated as an additional moisture load, hygIRC suggested that the rainscreen walls could not dry out in Vancouver, WUFI, however, indicated that they could dry to a safe MC level in the summer. The discrepancies in material property data between the two models and between different databases in WUFI (even for the same wood species) were found to be very large. In terms of wood sorption data, large differences existed at near-saturated RH levels. This is a result of using pressure-plate/membrane methods for measuring material equilibrium moisture content (EMC) under high RH conditions. The EMC of wood at near-100% RH conditions measured with these methods can be higher than 200%, suggesting wood in construction would decay without liquid water intrusion or severe vapour condensation. The pressure-plate/membrane methods also appeared to be highly species-dependent, and have higher EMC at a certain RH level for less permeable species, from which it is relatively difficult to remove water during the measurement. The hygrothermal simulation in this work suggested that such a species bias caused by testing methods could put impermeable species (most Canadian species) at a disadvantage to permeable species like southern pine during related durability design of building assemblies. In terms of using CLT for construction in Vancouver and Calgary, the WUFI simulations suggested that the use of less permeable materials such as EPS (expanded polystyrene insulation), XPS (extruded polystyrene insulation), self-adhered bituminous membrane and polyethylene in wall assemblies reduced the ability of the walls to dry. On the other hand, permeable assemblies such as those using relatively permeable insulation like semi-rigid mineral wool (rock wool) as exterior insulation, instead of less permeable exterior insulation materials, would help walls dry. The simulation also suggested that using CLT products with initially low MC would significantly reduce moisture-related risks, which indicated the importance of protecting CLT and avoiding wetting during transportation and construction. In addition, the simulation found that indoor relative humidity (RH) conditions generated by the indoor RH prediction models included in hygIRC and WUFI varied greatly under the same basic climate and building conditions. The intermediate method specified in ASHRAE Standard 160 P resulted in long periods of saturated RH conditions throughout a year for the Vancouver climate, which may not be representative of ordinary residential buildings in Vancouver. The simulation in this study is preliminary and exploratory. It would be arbitrary to recommend one model over the other based on this report or use the simulation results directly for CLT wall assembly design without consultation with building science specialists. However, this work revealed more opportunities for close collaborations between the wood science and the building science communities. More work should be carried out to develop appropriate testing methods and assemble material property data for hygrothermal simulation of wood-based building assemblies. Model improvement and field verification are also strongly recommended, particularly for new building systems such as CLT constructions.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Characteristics of the Radio-Frequency/Vacuum Drying of Heavy Timbers for Post and Beam of Korean Style Housings Part II: For Korean Red Pine Heavy Timbers with 250 × 250 mm, 300 × 300 mm in Cross Section and 300 mm in Diameter, and 3,600 mm in Length

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1508
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Moisture
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Lee, Nam-Ho
Zhao, Xue-Feng
Shin, Ik-Hyun
Park, Moon-Jae
Park, Jung-Hwan
Park, Joo-Saeng
Publisher
The Korean Society of Wood Science Technology
Year of Publication
2011
Country of Publication
Korea
Format
Journal Article
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Radio-Frequency/Vacuum Drying
Moisture Gradient
Shrinkage
Case Hardening
Surface Checks
Compressive Load
Language
Korean
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of the Korean Wood Science and Technology
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Hygrothermal Properties of Cross Laminated Timber and Moisture Response of Wood at High Relative Humidity

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue12
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application

Moisture Response of Wall Assemblies of Cross-Laminated Timber Construction in Cold Canadian Climates

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue143
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls

Introduction to Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue705
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
General Information
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application

Cross Laminated Timber – Properties and Use for Building Purposes: A Review from the Experience of Swiss Researchers

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue23
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Mechanical Properties
General Information
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Author
Niemz, Peter
Sonderegger, Walter
Publisher
Transilvania University Press Brasov
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Romania
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Topic
Mechanical Properties
General Information
Keywords
Physical Properties
MOE
Bending Strength
Building Applications
Language
English
Romanian
Research Status
Complete
Series
Pro Ligno
ISSN
2069-7430
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Production and Technology of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT): A State-of-the-Art Report

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue263
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
General Information
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Author
Brandner, Reinhard
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Topic
General Information
Keywords
Production
Technology
Language
English
Conference
European Conference on Cross Laminated Timber (CLT)
Research Status
Complete
Notes
May 21-22, 2013, Graz, Austria
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Finite Element Modelling of Moisture Related and Visco-Elastic Deformations in Inhomogeneous Timber Beams

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue425
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Moisture
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams

Cross-Laminated Timber Roof Panels at the Promega Corporation Facility: Documenting Installation and Monitoring In-Service Moisture Conditions

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue801
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Glass, Samuel
Romanin, Jennifer
Schumacher, Jim
Spickler, Kris
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Keywords
Moisture
Temperature
Installation Process
Sensors
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The USDA Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) has, for the past two years, been assisting in removing technical barriers to the use of CLT and trying to develop interest in the United States for its utilization. Coincidentally, Promega Corporation, a leader ...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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US Edition - Chapter 1: Introduction To Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue820
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
General Information
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Author
Gagnon, Sylvain
Bilek, Ted
Podesto, Lisa
Crespell, Pablo
Organization
FPInnovations
Binational Softwood Lumber Council
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
United States
Format
Book Section
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Topic
General Information
Keywords
Codes
Construction
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
CLT Handbook - US Edition
ISBN
978-0-86488-553-1
ISSN
1925-0495
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT), a new generation of engineered wood product developed initially in Europe, has been gaining increased popularity in residential and non-residential applications in several countries. Many impressive low- and mid-rise buildings built around the world using CLT showcase the many advantages this product has to offer to the construction sector. In this Chapter, we put forward an introduction to CLT as a product and CLT construction in general, along with different examples of buildings and other structures made with CLT panels. CLT is now available in North America and several projects already built in Canada and the United States, using CLT, are presented in this Chapter. An assessment of market opportunity for CLT based on the latest construction statistics for the United States is also presented.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.