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41 records – page 1 of 5.

Experimental Investigation on the Long-Term Behaviour of Prefabricated Timber-Concrete Composite Beams with Steel Plate Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2741
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Connections
Serviceability
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Author
Shi, Benkai
Liu, Weiqing
Yang, Huifeng
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Topic
Connections
Serviceability
Keywords
TCC
Prefabrication
Steel Plate
Long-term Behaviour
Interface Slip
Loading
Shear Connections
Deflection
Temperature
Humidity
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
This paper presents the results of long-term experiments performed on three timber-concrete composite (TCC) beams. An innovative fabricated steel plate connection system, which consists of screws and steel plates embedded in concrete slabs, was adopted in the TCC beam specimens. The adopted shear connection can provide dry-type connection for TCC beams. Steel plates were embedded in concrete slabs while the concrete slab was constructed in factories. The timber beam and concrete slab can be assembled together using screws at the construction site. In this experimental programme, the beam specimens were subjected to constant loading for 613 days in indoor uncontrolled environments. The influence of long-term loading levels and the number of shear connections on the long-term performance of TCC beams was investigated and discussed. The mid-span deflection, timber strain, and interface relative slip at the positions of both connections and beam-ends were recorded throughout the long-term tests. It was found the long-term deflection of the TCC beam increased by approximately 60% while the long-term loads were doubled. Under the influence of the variable temperature and humidity, the TCC specimens with 8 shear connections showed slighter fluctuations compared with the TCC beam with 6 shear connections. In the 613-day observation period, the maximum deflection increment recorded was 6.56 mm for the specimen with eight shear connections and 20% loading level. A rheological model consisting of two Kelvin bodies was employed to fit the curves of creep coefficients. The final deflections predicted of all specimens at the end of 50-year service life were 2.1~2.7 times the initial deflections caused by the applied loads. All beam specimens showed relative small increments in mid-span deflection, strain and relative slip over time without any degradations, demonstrating the excellent long-term performance of TCC beams using the innovative steel plate connection system, which is also easily fabricated.
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Structural Capacity of One-Way Spanning Large-Scale Cross-Laminated Timber Slabs in Standard and Natural Fires

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2734
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Ceilings
Author
Wiesner, Felix
Bartlett, Alastair
Mohaine, Siyimane
Robert, Fabienne
McNamee, Robert
Mindeguia, Jean-Christophe
Bisby, Luke
Organization
University of Queensland
The University of Edinburgh
CERIB Fire Testing Centre
Brandskyddslaget
University of Bordeaux
Publisher
Springer
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Ceilings
Topic
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Deflection
Temperature
Load Bearing Capacity
Ventilation
Fire Safety
Research Status
Complete
Series
Fire Technology
Summary
This paper describes selected observations, measurements, and analysis from a series of large-scale experiments on cross-laminated timber (CLT) slabs that were exposed to fire from below, using four different heating scenarios, with a sustained mechanical loading of 6.3 kN m per metre width of slab. The deflection response and in-depth timber temperatures are used to compare the experimental response against a relatively simple structural fire model to assess the load bearing capacity of CLT elements in fire, including during the decay phase of natural fires. It is demonstrated that the ventilation conditions in experiments with a fixed fuel load are important in achieving burnout of the contents before structural collapse occurs. A mechanics-based structural fire model is shown to provide reasonably accurate predictions of structural failure (or lack thereof) for the experiments presented herein. The results confirm the importance of the ventilation conditions on the fire dynamics, burning duration, and the achievement of functional fire safety objectives (i.e. maintaining stability and compartmentation), in compartments with exposed CLT.
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Elevated Temperature Effects on the Shear Performance of a Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Wall-to-Floor Bracket Connection

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2106
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Fire
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors

Moisture-Induced Stresses in Large Glulam Beams. Case Study: Vihantasalmi Bridge

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2468
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Moisture
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Bridges and Spans

Novel Testing for Stiffness Reductions of Cross-Laminated Timber at Elevated Temperature

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2454
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams

Solutions for Upper Mid-Rise and High-Rise Mass Timber Construction: Fire Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber with Adhesives Conforming to 2018 edition of ANSI/APA PRG-320

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2091
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dagenais, Christian
Ranger, Lindsay
Bénichou, Noureddine
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2019
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
Adhesives
Temperature
Charring Rate
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The objective of this research is to evaluate CLT face-bonded with adhesives that meet the new 2018 ANSI/APA PRG 320 with respect to elevated temperature requirements and their effects on the resulting charring rates when exposed to the standard time-temperature curve of CAN/ULC S101 (similar exposure to ASTM E119)...
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Structural Capacity in Fire of Laminated Timber Elements in Compartments with Exposed Timber Surfaces

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2105
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Rooms

Ability of Finger-Jointed Lumber to Maintain Load at Elevated Temperatures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1832
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Material
Other Materials
Author
Rammer, Douglas
Zelinka, Samuel
Hasburgh, Laura
Craft, Steven
Publisher
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Journal Article
Material
Other Materials
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Small Scale
Full Scale
Bending Test
Melamine Formaldehyde
Phenol-Resorcinol Formaldehyde
Creep
Polyurethane
Polyvinyl Acetate
Temperature
Durability
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood and Fiber Science. 50(1): 44-54.
Summary
This article presents a test method that was developed to screen adhesive formulations for finger-jointed lumber. The goal was to develop a small-scale test that could be used to predict whether an adhesive would pass a full-scale ASTM E119 wall assembly test. The method involved loading a 38-mm square finger-jointed sample in a four-point bending test inside of an oven with a target sample temperature of 204°C. The deformation (creep) was examined as a function of time. It was found that samples fingerjointed with melamine formaldehyde and phenol resorcinol formaldehyde adhesives had the same creep behavior as solid wood. One-component polyurethane and polyvinyl acetate adhesives could not maintain the load at the target temperature measured middepth of the sample, and several different types of creep behavior were observed before failure. This method showed that the creep performance of the onecomponent adhesives may be quite different than the performance from short-term load deformation curves collected at high temperatures. The importance of creep performance of adhesives in the fire resistance of engineered wood is discussed.
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Correct Temperature Measurements in Fire Exposed Wood

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2025
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Fahrni, Reto
Schmid, Joachim
Klippel, Michael
Frangi, Andrea
Organization
ETH Zurich
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Temperature
Thermocouples
Charring
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The performance of timber in fire is often assessed by measuring the temperature at different positions in the specimen. As timber is a low conductive material, it can be difficult to measure the correct temperature.Therefore, this paper shows how to correctly measure the temperature in timber members and how to describe temperature measurements of fire tests and experiments non-ambiguously.Typical temperature measurement setups used in tests and experiments were experimentally assessed under ISO/EN fire exposure and a constant incident radiant heat flux. By comparing the charring depth and the thermocouple readings(charring temperature 300°C) it was found that only the wire thermocouples inlaid parallel to the isotherms deliver correct temperature readings. For other temperature measurement setups, the underestimation was between 5 and 20 minutes.Due to the numerous factors influencing the measurement error, no correction factor could be defined.
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Field Measurement of Vertical Movement and Roof Moisture Performance of the Wood Innovation and Design Centre

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1182
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Roofs
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Roofs
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Keywords
Vertical Movement
Moisture Content
Temperature
Relative Humidity
Monitoring
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Two of the major topics of interest to those designing taller and larger wood buildings are the susceptibility to differential movement and the likelihood of mass timber components drying too slowly after they become wet during construction. The Wood Innovation and Design Centre in Prince George, British Columbia provides a unique opportunity for non-destructive testing and monitoring to measure the ‘As Built’ performance of a relatively tall mass timber building. Field measurements also provide performance data to support regulatory and market acceptance of wood-based systems in tall and large buildings. This report covers vertical movement and roof moisture performance measured from this building for about three and a half years, with sensors installed during the construction. The report first describes instrumentation. The locations selected for installing displacement sensors for measuring vertical movement comprised of the following: glued-laminated timber (glulam) columns together with cross-laminated timber (CLT) floors on three lower floors; a glulam column together with a parallel strand lumber (PSL) transfer beam on the first floor; and a CLT shear wall of the core structure on each floor from the second up to the top floor. Sensors were also installed to measure environmental conditions (temperature and relative humidity) in the immediate vicinity of the components being monitored. In addition, six locations in the timber roof were selected and instrumented for measuring moisture changes in the wood as well as the local environmental conditions. Most sensors went into operation in the middle of March 2014, after the roof sheathing was installed.
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41 records – page 1 of 5.