Skip header and navigation

51 records – page 1 of 6.

Advanced Methods of Encapsulation

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue41
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Roy-Poirier, Audrey
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Codes
Encapsulation
Type X Gypsum Board
National Building Code of Canada
Tall Wood
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project aims to support the construction of tall wood buildings by identifying encapsulation methods that provide adequate protection of mass timber elements; the intention is that these methods could potentially be applied to mass timber elements so that the overall assembly could achive a 2 h fire resistance rating.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Advanced Wood-Based Solutions for Mid-Rise and High-Rise Construction: In-Situ Testing of The Arbora Building for Vibration and Acoustic Performances

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1179
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Hu, Lin
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Keywords
Sound Insulation
Tall Wood
Vibration Performance
Mid-Rise
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report addresses serviceability issues of tall wood buildings focusing on vibration and sound insulation performance. The sound insulation and vibration performance may not affect building's safety, but affects occupants' comfort and proper operation of the buildings and the funciton of sensitive equipment, consequently the acceptance of midrise and tall wood buildings in market place. Lack of data, knowledge and experience of sound and vibration performance of tall wood buildings is one of the issues related to design and construction of tall wood buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

An Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from CLT and Glulam in Two Residential Nearly Zero Energy Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2441
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Behavior of CLT Diaphragm Panel-to-Panel Connections with Self-tapping Screws

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2188
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Screws
Tall Wood
Earthquake
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Thomas Miller at Oregon State University
Summary
Understanding how roof and floor systems (commonly called diaphragms by engineers) that are built from Pacific Northwest-sourced cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels perform in earthquake prone areas is a critical area of research. These building components are key to transferring normal and extreme event forces into walls and down to the foundation. The tests performed in this project will provide data on commonly used approaches to connecting CLT panels within a floor or roof space and the performance of associated screw fasteners. Structural engineers will directly benefit through improved modeling tools. A broader benefit may be increased confidence in the construction of taller wood buildings in communities at greater risk for earthquakes.
Less detail

Behaviour of Multi-Storey Cross-Laminated Timber Buildings Under Lateral Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2715
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Hughes, Claire
Publisher
Queen's University Belfast
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Keywords
Lateral Loading
Tall Wood
Tall Timber Buildings
Connections
Monotonic Loading Tests
Constant Vertical Load
Wall Systems
Experimental Tests
Analytical Approach
Multi-Storey
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In response to the global drive towards sustainable construction, CLT has emerged as a competitive alternative to other construction materials. CLT buildings taller than 10-storeys and CLT buildings in regions of moderate to high seismicity would be subject to higher lateral loads due to wind and earthquakes than CLT buildings which have already been completed. The lack of structural design codes and limited literature regarding the performance of CLT buildings under lateral loading are barriers to the adoption of CLT for buildings which could experience high lateral loading. Previous research into the behaviour of CLT buildings under lateral loading has involved testing of building components. These studies have generally been limited to testing wall systems and connections which replicate configurations at ground floor storeys in buildings no taller than three storeys. Consequently, to develop the understanding of the performance of multi-storey CLT buildings under lateral loading, the performance of wall systems and connections which replicate conditions of those in above ground floor storeys in buildings taller than three storeys were experimentally investigated. The testing of typical CLT connections involved testing eighteen configurations under cyclic loading in shear and tension. The results of this experimental investigation highlighted the need for capacity-based design of CLT connections to prevent brittle failure. It was found that both hold down and angle bracket connections have strength and stiffness in shear and tension and by considering the strength of the connections in both directions, more economical design of CLT buildings could be achieved. The testing of CLT wall systems involved testing three CLT wall systems with identical configurations under monotonic lateral load and constant vertical load, with vertical loads replicating gravity loads at storeys within a 10-storey CLT building. The results show that vertical load has a significant influence on wall system behaviour; varying the vertical load was found to vary the contribution of deformation mechanisms to global behaviour within the elastic region, reinforcing the need to consider connection design at each individual storey. As there are still no structural design codes for CLT buildings, the accuracy of analytical methods presented within the literature for predicting the behaviour of CLT connections and wall systems under lateral loading was assessed. It was found that the analytical methods for both connections and wall systems are highly inaccurate and do not reflect experimentally observed behaviour.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Canadian Mass Timber Demonstration Projects Initiatives

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2147
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Market and Adoption
Application
Wood Building Systems

The Case for Tall Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue835
Edition
Second
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
General Information
Cost
Environmental Impact
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Michael Green Architecture
Edition
Second
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
General Information
Cost
Environmental Impact
Design and Systems
Keywords
FFTT
Tall Wood
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The report describes a new structural system in wood that is the first significant challenger to concrete and steel structures since their inception in tall building design more than a century ago. The introduction of these ideas is fundamentally driven by the need to find safe, carbon-neutral and sustainable alternatives to the incumbent structural materials of the urban world. The market for these ideas is quite simply enormous. The proposed solutions have significant capacity to revolutionize the building industry to address the major challenges of climate change, urbanization, sustainable development and world housing needs.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Case Studies of Risk-To-Life Due to Fire in Mid- and High-Rise, Combustible and Non-Combustible Buildings Using CUrisk

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue279
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Zhang, Xia
Mehaffey, Jim
Hadjisophocleous, George
Organization
Carleton University
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
High-Rise
Mid-Rise
Residential
Tall Wood
Office Buildings
CUrisk
Risk-to-Life
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Both the BCBC and the NBCC are objective-based codes whose provisions are deemed to be acceptable solutions. Alternative solutions are permitted; however, they must be demonstrated to provide a level of performance equivalent to that of the acceptable solution they are replacing. There is interest in Canada in constructing tall wood buildings. To aid in the design and approval of such buildings, FPInnovations oversaw the development of a Technical Guide for the Design and Construction of Tall Wood Buildings in Canada. Chapter 5 of the Guide addresses Fire Safety and Protection in tall buildings. Rather than developing site-specific regulations for tall wood buildings, a more robust approach, recommended in Chapter 5 of the Tall Wood Guide, would be to demonstrate quantitatively that the fire safety provisions proposed for the building yield fire risks that are not greater than the fire risks associated with the acceptable solutions of the code. Unfortunately BCBC and NBCC do not provide a quantitative method for assessing the level of fire safety (or risk-to-life) inherent in the design of a building. However, CUrisk, the most comprehensive model available for assessing the fire risk in buildings, can assess how fire protection measures work together to ensure life safety by computing the risk-to-life due to fire in the building. In this project, CUrisk was employed to assess and compare the risk-to-life due to fire in mid-rise and high-rise residential and office buildings of wood construction and of non-combustible construction and to demonstrate how fire protection measures can be tuned to ensure a mid-rise or high-rise building of wood construction is as safe as a similar building of non-combustible construction.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Case Study: An 18 Storey Tall Mass Timber Hybrid Student Residence at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2120
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Fast, Paul
Gafner, Bernhard
Jackson, Robert
Li, Jimmy
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Tall Wood
Mass Timber
Rolling Shear
Prefabrication
Damping
Tolerances
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This article outlines the structural design approach used for the Brock Commons Student Residence project, an 18-storey wood building at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. When completed in summer 2017, it will be the tallest mass timber hybrid building in the world at 53 meters high. Fast + Epp are the structural engineers, working in conjunction with Acton Ostry Architects and Hermann Kaufmann Architekten. Total project costs, inclusive of fees, permits etc. are $51.5M CAD.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

CLT Feasibility Study: A Study of Alternative Construction Methods in the Pacific Northwest

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1896
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Walls
Organization
Mahlum Architects
Walsh Construction
Coughlin Porter Lundeen
Publisher
Seattle Department of Construction & Inspections (SDCI)
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Keywords
Building Code
Fire Tests
Seismic
Tall Wood
Multi-Story
Cost comparison
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This study explores the use of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) in a 10-story residential building as an alternative building method to concrete and steel construction. The study is not meant to be exhaustive, rather a preliminary investigation to test the economic viability of utilizing this new material to increase density, walkability and sustainable responsiveness in our built environment. Based on international precedent, CLT is an applicable material for low-rise, as well as mid-rise to high-rise construction and has a lighter environmental footprint than traditional concrete and steel construction systems. Cross-laminated timber is a large format solid wood panel building system originating from central Europe. As a construction system it is similar to precast concrete in which large prefabricated panels are lifted by crane and installed using either a balloon frame or platform frame system. The advantages to using CLT are many, but the main benefits include: shorter construction times, fewer skilled laborers, better tolerances and quality, safer work environment, utilization of regional, sustainable materials, and reduction of carbon footprint of buildings. As a new, unproven material in the Pacific Northwest, this study investigates the cost competitiveness of CLT versus traditional materials for “low high-rise” buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

51 records – page 1 of 6.