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126 records – page 1 of 13.

Advanced Industrialized Construction to Achieve High Building Energy Efficiency

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2828
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Energy Performance
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Building Envelope
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Building Envelope
Topic
Energy Performance
Keywords
Prefabrication
Offsite Construction
Energy Efficiency
Retrofit
New Construction
Mid-Rise
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
InfoNote
Summary
Advanced industrialized construction methods enable complex building components and systems to be built with high precision and quality. This manufacturing technique has an advantage to provide cost-competitive and high energy efficient building components and systems for both retrofits and new construction. This document gives an overview of the use of prefabricated panels in building Net Zero Energy Ready wood-frame multi-unit residential buildings (MURBs) in Edmonton.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Advancing Knowledge of Mid-ply Shear Walls: Mid-Ply Shear Wall Fire Resistance Testing

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2808
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Fire
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Shear Walls
Fire Resistance Rating
Mid-Rise
Midply Wall
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The objective of this research is to address a knowledge gap related to fire performance of midply shear walls. Testing has already been done to establish the structural performance of these assemblies. To ensure their safe implementation and their broad acceptance, this project will establish fire resistance ratings for midply shear walls. Fire tests will provide information for the development of design considerations for midply shear walls and confirm that they can achieve at least 1-hour fire-resistance ratings that are required for use in mid-rise buildings. This research will support greater adoption of mid-rise residential and non-residential wood-frame construction and improve competition with similar buildings of noncombustible construction. This work will also support the development of the APA system report for midply walls, which will be a design guideline for using midply walls in North America.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Construction Cost Analysis of High-performance Multi-unit Residential Buidlings in British Columbia

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2792
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Cost
Energy Performance
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Zero Emissions Building Exchange
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Cost
Energy Performance
Keywords
BC Energy Step Code
Net Zero Energy Ready
Mid-Rise
Passive House
Construction Cost
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Does it really cost more to build a high-performance building? Historically, this question has been addressed with theoretical studies based on varying the design of common building archetypes, but nothing beats the real thing. ZEBx, in partnership with BTY Group and seven builders from across BC, has completed a cost analysis of seven high-performance, wood-framed, mid-rise, multi-unit residential buildings that meet Step 4 of the Energy Step Code or the Passive House standard. The results of the study may surprise you!
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Field Hygrothermal Performance of R22+ Wood-Frame Walls in Vancouver

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2775
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Moisture
Energy Performance
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Moisture
Energy Performance
Keywords
Hygrothermal Performance
Exterior Wall
Mid-Rise
Panels
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
A test program was conducted to generate hygrothermal performance data for light-wood-frame exterior walls meeting the R22 effective (RSI 3.85) requirement for buildings up to six storeys in the City of Vancouver. Six types of exterior wall assemblies, with 12 wall panels in total, were tested using a test hut located in the rear yard of FPInnovations’ Vancouver aboratory. This document provides a brief summary of the test and performance of these walls based on the data collected over the 19 months’ period from October 2018 to May 2020
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Le Rendement Hygrothermique de Murs à Ossature de Bois R22+ à Vancouver

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2776
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Moisture
Energy Performance
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Moisture
Energy Performance
Keywords
Hygrothermal Performance
Exterior Wall
Mid-Rise
Panels
Language
French
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Un programme d’essais a été réalisé en vue de générer des données sur le rendement hygrothermique des murs à ossature légère de bois qui répondent à l’exigence R22 (RSI 3,85) pour les bâtiments d'au plus six étages à Vancouver. Six types d’assemblage de mur extérieur, avec un total de 12 murs extérieurs, ont été mis à l’essai à l’aide d’une hutte d’essai située dans la cour arrière du laboratoire de FPInnovations à Vancouver. Le présent document présente un court résumé de l’essai et du rendement de ces murs en se basant sur les données recueillies sur une période de 19 mois, soit d’octobre 2018 à mai 2020 (Wang 2021).
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Testing R22+ Wood-Frame Walls for Hygrothermal Performance in the Vancouver Climate: Field Wall Performance

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2768
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Energy Performance
Moisture
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Energy Performance
Moisture
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Energy Efficiency
Exterior Wall
Hygrothermal
Multi-Storey
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This new study aims to generate hygrothermal, particularly moisture-related performance data for light wood-frame walls meeting the R22 effective (RSI 3.85) requirement for buildings up to six storeys in the City of Vancouver. The overarching goal is to identify and develop durable exterior wood-frame walls to assist in the design and construction of energy efficient buildings across the country. Twelve test wall panels in six types of wall assemblies are assessed in this study. The wall panels, each measuring 4 ft. (1200 mm) wide and 8 ft. (2400 mm) tall, form portions of the exterior walls of a test hut located in the rear yard of FPInnovations’ Vancouver laboratory. This report, second in a series on this study, documents the performance of these wall assemblies based on the data collected over 19 months’ period from October 2018 to May 2020, covering two winter seasons and one summer.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Buildings as a Global Carbon Sink

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2821
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Churkina, Galina
Organschi, Alan
Reyer, Christopher
Ruff, Andrew
Vinke, Kira
Liu, Zhu
Reck, Barabara
Graedel, T.E.
Schellnhuber, Hans Joachim
Publisher
Springer Nature
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
GHG emission reduction
Mid-Rise
Mass Timber
Steel
Concrete
Material Substitution
Commercial Buildings
Residential Buildings
Global
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Notes
doi.org/10.1038/s41893-019-0462-4
Summary
The anticipated growth and urbanization of the global population over the next several decades will create a vast demand for the construction of new housing, commercial buildings and accompanying infrastructure. The production of cement, steel and other building materials associated with this wave of construction will become a major source of greenhouse gas emissions. Might it be possible to transform this potential threat to the global climate system into a powerful means to mitigate climate change? To answer this provocative question, we explore the potential of mid-rise urban buildings designed with engineered timber to provide long-term storage of carbon and to avoid the carbon-intensive production of mineral-based construction materials.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Encapsulation of Mass Timber Floor Surfaces

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2528
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors

Feasibility of Cross Laminated Timber Panels in Construction: A Case Study of Carbon12

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2594
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Graber, Erik
Publisher
California Polytechnic State University
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Case Study
Cost comparison
Concrete Slab
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) is an extremely strong engineered wood panel intended for roof, floor, or wall applications. Currently there is little research comparing CLT to steel and concrete, materials CLT hopes to replace This research uses a detailed literary analysis on CLT and case study on Carbon12, a recently constructed CLT structure in Portland, Oregon, to compare the cost and schedule requirements of CLT with a cast-in-place concrete slab. The case study consisted of a detailed analysis of Carbon12, interview with Scott Noble, senior project manager for Carbon12, and a detailed schedule and cost analysis. Results showed that for a concrete floor system used on Carbon12, material costs were far less than costs for a CLT floor system and labor costs were far greater than costs for a CLT floor system. For the schedule analysis, results showed that a concrete floor system would add an additional 10 weeks to the construction schedule of Carbon12. These results led to the conclusion that CLT is a feasible building material for dense, urban, mid-rise structures similar to Carbon12. The quick installation time, small crew, and environmental benefits of CLT outweigh the added costs of the material.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Flame Spread in Concealed Mass Timber Spaces

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2529
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Fire
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Floor Voids
Fire Tests
Mid-Rise
Concealed Spaces
Fire Performance
Mass Timber
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The overall objective of this work is to expand options for designers of mass timber buildings by reducing the dependence on concrete and gypsum board though the demonstration of adequate fire performance of mass timber assemblies. This work is intended to demonstrate that mass timber surfaces can be left exposed in concealed spaces, under certain conditions, while still performing well to control flame spread; this could result in significant savings in construction. Flame spread testing will be completed to compare the performance of mass timber assemblies and concealed space designs that are currently allowed by the NFPA 13 to be exempt from the installation ofsprinklers. Data is needed to support the use of exposed mass timber in concealed spaces by demonstrating limited flame spread in concealed mass timber void spaces. Flame spread testing has already shown that mass timber has lower flame spread ratings than typically found with thinner wood panels. This will lead the way in allowing unsprinklered 305 mm (12 in.) deep concealed spaces beneath mass timber assemblies or exposed mass timber in other concealed spaces such as hollow wood floor beams. The goal is to generate data to support the use of exposed mass timber in concealed spaces. This data could be used in an Alternative Solution to gain approval for this type of design. Ultimately, this could lead to changing the NBCC to allow exposed mass timber in concealed spaces.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

126 records – page 1 of 13.