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57 records – page 1 of 6.

Analysis of Rotational Stiffness of the Timber Frame Connection

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2763
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Author
Johanides, Marek
Kubíncová, Lenka
Mikolášek, David
Lokaj, Antonín
Sucharda, Oldrich
Mynarcík, Petr
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Rotational Stiffness
Frame Connection
Screw
Numerical Model
FEM
Finite Element Model
Mechanical Fasteners
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Sustainability
Summary
Initially, timber was considered only as an easily accessible and processable material in nature; however, its excellent properties have since become better understood. During the discovery of new building materials and thanks to new technological development processes, industrial processing technologies and gradually drastically decreasing forest areas, wood has become an increasingly neglected material. Load-bearing structures are made mostly of reinforced concrete or steel elements. However, ecological changes, the obvious problems associated with environmental pollution and climate change, are drawing increasing attention to the importance of environmental awareness. These factors are attracting increased attention to wood as a building material. The increased demand for timber as a building material offers the possibility of improving its mechanical and physical properties, and so new wood-based composite materials or new joints of timber structures are being developed to ensure a better load capacity and stiffness of the structure. Therefore, this article deals with the improvement of the frame connection of the timber frame column and a diaphragm beam using mechanical fasteners. In common practice, bolts or a combination of bolts and pins are used for this type of connection. The subject of the research and its motivation was to replace these commonly used fasteners with more modern ones to shorten and simplify the assembly time and to improve the load capacity and rigidity of this type of frame connection.
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Braced Frame System for Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2527
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Frames
Author
Iqbal, Asif
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Frames
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Lateral Load Resisting Systems
Sustainability
Post-Tensioned
Connections
Braced Frame Model
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Advanced sustainable lateral load resisting systems that combine ductile and recyclable materials offer a viable solution to resist seismic load effects in environmentally responsible ways. This paper presents the seismic response of a post-tensioned timber-steel hybrid braced frame. This hybrid system combines glulam frame with steel braces to improve lateral stiffness while providing self-centreing capability under seismic loads. The proposed system is first presented. A detailed numerical model of the proposed system is then developed with emphasis on the connections and inelastic response of bracing members. Various types of braced frames including diagonal, cross and chevron configurations are numerically examined to assess the viability of the proposed concept and to confirm the efficiency of the system. A summary of initial findings is presented to demonstrate usefulness of the hybrid system. The results demonstrate that the proposed system increases overall lateral stiffness and ductility while still being able to achieve self-centring. Some additional information on connection details are provided for implementation in practical structures. The braced-frame solution is expected to widen options for lateral load resisting systems for mid-to-high-rise buildings.
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Combination of Steel Plate Shear Walls and Timber Moment Frames for Improved Seismic Performance

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2735
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Frames
Author
Iqbal, Asif
Todorov, Borislav
Billah, Muntasir
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Timber Moment Frames
Steel Plate Shear Walls
Hybrid
Seismic Performance
Interstory Drifts
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Earthquake Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Recent interests in adopting sustainable materials and developments in construction technology have created a trend of aiming for greater heights with timber buildings. With the increased height these buildings are subjected to higher level of lateral load demand. A common and efficient way to increase capacity is to use shearwalls, which can resist significant part of the load on the structures. Prefabricated mass timber panels such as those made of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) can be used to form the shearwalls. But due to relatively low stiffness value of timber it is often difficult to keep the maximum drifts within acceptable limit prescribed by building codes. It becomes necessary to either increase wall sizes to beyond available panel dimensions or use multiple or groups of walls spread over different locations over the floor plan. Both of the options are problematic from the economic and functional point of view. One possible alternative is to adopt a Hybrid system, using Steel Plate Shear Walls (SPSW) with timber moment frames. The SPSW has much higher stiffness and combined with timber frames it can reduce overall building drifts significantly. Frames with prefabricated timber members have considerable lateral load capacity. For structures located in seismic regions the system possesses excellent energy dissipation ability with combination of ductile SPSW and yielding elements within the frames. This paper investigates combination of SPSW with timber frames for seismic applications. Numerical model of the system has been developed to examine the interaction between the frames and shear walls under extreme lateral load conditions. Arrangements of different geometries of frames and shear walls are evaluated to determine their compatibility and efficiency in sharing lateral loads. Recommendations are presented for optimum solutions as well as practical limits of applications.
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Construction and Testing of Glued Laminated Timber Frames For Use in Laying Poultry Houses

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2588
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Wood Building Systems
Author
Stringari, Eduardo
Petrauski, Alfredo
Petrauski, Sandra
Azevedo, Ricardo
Savaris, Gustavo
Publisher
SciELO
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Adhesive
Structural Behavior
Rural Buildings
Araucaria angustifolia
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engenharia Agrícola
Summary
This study aimed to present a solution in glued laminated timber to replace frame structures built in reinforced concrete and metallic structure, which are common in agricultural buildings in western Paraná such as those destined to laying poultry house building by agricultural cooperatives. Structural behavior of frames build from Araucaria angustifolia glued boards and vegetable oil-based polyurethane adhesive was evaluated. Tests were carried out to characterize wood and adhesive to obtain verification/sizing parameters. Initially, a full-scale structural project was conducted to meet standard laying poultry house specifications. Afterwards, five units of straight three-articulated frames on a 1:2.5 reduced scale were designed, built, and subjected to strength tests until breaking. They were built with a 2-meter free span and a 15° slope, suitable for using metal roof tiles. The average for structure ultimate strength was 4.14 times the design load. Structures had satisfactory mechanical performance and displacements lower than those recommended by NBR 7190 (1997) standard (ABNT). Therefore, building glued frames with Parana pine boards and vegetable oil-based glue is technically feasible.
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Modular Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2748
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Frames
Author
Kuda, D
Petrícková, M
Publisher
IOP Publishing Ltd
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Frames
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Modular Structure
High-Rise
Load Bearing
Case Study
Gridshell
Universal System
Language
English
Conference
International Conference on New Advances in Civil Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Series
IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering
Summary
Related to sustainability movement and minimizing the carbon footprint, timber structures are becoming more attractive. Wood, as main structural material, offers many benefits relate mostly to economic and ecological aspects, compared to other materials as steel or concrete. On the other hand, physical characteristics of wood complicate the usage of a timber for high-rise or large-span structures. It brings a new challenge for architects and engineers to deliver feasible solution for usability of timber, despite its features. One of the possible solutions could be implementation of CLT (Cross-Laminate Timber) panels in structural systems developed earlier for buildings made of prefabricated concrete slabs. SOM in cooperation with Oregon State University are currently testing composite slabs made of CLT and thin concrete layer reinforcing the wood and protecting it from fire. Although the system solution looks promising, and could bring the result, slabs limit using of the space in layout. On the other hand, frame structures would be much more efficient. This article comes up with an idea of modular frame structure, which could help to solve the problem. The scheme is based on "gridshell" type systems, where rods form a more efficient shell for dealing with stress forces.
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Development of Timber Buckling Restrained Braces for Mass Timber Braced Frames

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2544
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Application
Frames
Author
Murphy, Colton
Pantelides, Chris
Blomgren, Hans-Erik
Rammer, Douglas
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Application
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Brace
Buckling
Damping
Fuse
Seismic
Structure
Timber
Language
English
Conference
International Network on Timber Engineering Research
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Buckling Restrained Brace Frames (BRBF) are a proven and reliable method to provide an efficient lateral force resisting system for new and existing structures in earthquake prone regions. The fuse-type elements in this system facilitate stable energy dissipation at large load deformation levels. Currently, the new trend towards mass timber vertical structures creates a need for a lightweight compatible lateral force resisting system. A Buckling Restrained Brace (BRB) component is possible to construct and feasible to implement when combining a steel core with a mass timber casing herein named the Timber-Buckling Restrained Brace (T-BRB). T-BRBs when combined with mass timber beam and column elements can create a system that will have advantages over the current steel framed BRBF system when considering recyclability, sustainability, framing compatibility, and performance. This paper presents findings on small scale testing of candidate engineered wood products for the T-BRB casing and testing of six full scale 12 ft long 60 kip braces according to code prescribed loading protocols and acceptance criteria.
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Dynamic Analysis and Comparison of High-Rise Building Frames Made of Mass-Timber and Traditional Materials Using Finite Element Analysis

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2284
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Frames

Solutions for Upper Mid-Rise and High-Rise Mass Timber Construction: Seismic Performance of Braced Mass Timber Frames, Year 1

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2640
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Author
Chen, Zhiyong
Popovski, Marjan
Symons, Paul
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2019
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Lateral Load
Seismic Performance
Braced Frames
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Braced mass timber (MT) frames are one of the most efficient structural systems to resist lateral loads induced by earthquakes or high winds. Although braced frames are presented as a system in the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC), no design guidelines currently exist in CSA O86. That not only leaves these efficient systems out of reach of designers, but also puts them in danger of being eliminated from NBCC. The main objective of this project was to develop the technical information needed for development of design guidelines for braced MT frames as a lateral load resisting system in CSA O86. In the first year of the project, the seismic performance of thirty (30) braced MT frames with riveted connections with various numbers of storeys, storey heights, and bay aspect ratios were studied by conducting non-linear pushover and dynamic time-history analyses. Also, fifteen (15) glulam brace specimens using bolted connections with different slenderness ratios were tested under monotonic and cyclic loading. Results from this multi-year project will form the basis for developing comprehensive design guidelines for braced frames in CSA O86.
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Extended End Plate Semi-Rigid Composite Joints with CLT Panels and Demountable Shear Connectors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2059
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames

Feasibility Study of a Wood-Concrete Hybrid Super Tall Building and Optimization of its Wind-Induced Behaviour

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1902
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Wind
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Frames
Walls
Shafts and Chases

57 records – page 1 of 6.