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271 records – page 1 of 28.

Cyclic Response of Insulated Steel Angle Brackets Used for Cross-Laminated Timber Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2765
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Seismic
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Kržan, Meta
Azinovic, Boris
Publisher
Springer
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Seismic
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Keywords
Angle Bracket
Sound Insulation
Insulation
Monotonic Test
Cyclic Tests
Wall-to-Floor
Stiffness
Load Bearing Capacity
Shear
Tensile
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
European Journal of Wood and Wood Products
Summary
In cross-laminated timber (CLT) buildings, in order to reduce the disturbing transmission of sound over the flanking parts, special insulation layers are used between the CLT walls and slabs, together with insulated angle-bracket connections. However, the influence of such CLT connections and insulation layers on the seismic resistance of CLT structures has not yet been studied. In this paper, experimental investigation on CLT panels installed on insulation bedding and fastened to the CLT floor using an innovative, insulated, steel angle bracket, are presented. The novelty of the investigated angle-bracket connection is, in addition to the sound insulation, its resistance to both shear as well as uplift forces as it is intended to be used instead of traditional angle brackets and hold-down connections to simplify the construction. Therefore, monotonic and cyclic tests on the CLT wall-to-floor connections were performed in shear and tensile/compressive load direction. Specimens with and without insulation under the angle bracket and between the CLT panels were studied and compared. Tests of insulated specimens have proved that the insulation has a marginal influence on the load-bearing capacity; however, it significantly influences the stiffness characteristics. In general, the experiments have shown that the connection could also be used for seismic resistant CLT structures, although some minor improvements should be made.
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Deconstructable Hybrid Connections for the Next Generation of Prefabricated Mass Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2809
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Hybrid Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Shulman, Samuel
Loss, Cristiano
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Hybrid Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Steel Rods
Epoxy
Push-Out-Shear Tests
Prefabrication
Disassembly
Reuse
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Timber has been used for building construction for centuries, until the industrial revolution, when it was often replaced by steel and concrete or confined to low-rise housings. In the last thirty years however, thanks to the development of mass timber products and new global interest in sustainability, timber has begun to make a resurgence in the building industry. As building codes and public perception continues to change, the demand for taller and higher-performance timber buildings will only grow. Thus, a need exists for new construction technology appropriate for taller mass timber construction, as well as for fabrication and deconstruction practices that respect wood’s inherent sustainable nature. With this in mind, this research program aims to develop a new hybrid shear connection for mass timber buildings that allows for easy construction, deconstruction, and reuse of the structural elements. This report includes results of Phase 1, which focused on connections consisting of partially threaded 20M and 24M steel rods bonded into pockets formed in CLT and surrounded by thick crowns of high-strength three-component epoxy-based grout. A total of 168 specimens were designed and fabricated, and push-out shear tests carried out with a displacement-controlled monotonic loading protocol. Strength and stiffness values were assessed and effective failure modes in specimens identified. These latter, along with the recorded load-deformation curves, indicate that it is possible to develop mechanics-based design models and design formulas akin to those already used for typical dowel-type fastener timber connections. Additionally, the specimens were easily fabricated in the lab and quickly fastened to the test jig by means of nuts and washers, suggested such connections have a strong potential for prefabrication, disassembly, and reuse.
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Developing a Large Span Timber-based Composite Floor System for Highrise Office Buildings Phase I

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2803
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Zhang, Chao
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Box Girder
Timber Composite Floor
Span
High-Rise
Tall Wood Buildings
Stiffness
Composite Action
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project proposes a timber-based composite floor that can span 12 m and be used in the construction of 40+ story office buildings. This floor system integrates timber panels and timber beams to form a continuous box girder structure. The timber panels function as the flanges and the timber beams as the web. The beams are spaced and connected to the flange panels so that sufficient bending stiffness of a 12 m span can be achieved via the development of composite action. The current phase of this project studied the performance of the connections between timber elements in the proposed composite member. Six types of connections using different flange material and connection techniques were tested: Cross Laminated Timber (CLT), Laminated Strand Lumber (LSL), Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL), and Post Laminated Veneer Lumber (PLVL). Glulam was used as the web. The majority of the connections used self-tapping wood screws except one had notches. The load-carrying capacity, stiffness, and ductility of the connections were measured. The stiffness of CLT, LSL, and PLVL connections was in the same range, 19-20 kN/mm per screw. Amongst the three, LSL had the highest peak load and PLVL had the highest proportional limit. The stiffness of the two LVL screw connections was around 13 kN/mm. The notched LVL connection had significantly higher stiffness than the rest, and its peak load was in the same range as LSL, but the failure was brittle. LVL was used to manufacture the full scale timber composite floor element. With a spacing of 400 mm, the overall stiffness reached 33689 N
mm2×109, which was 2.5 times the combined stiffness of two Glulam beams. The predicted overall stiffness based on Gamma method was within 5% of the tested value, and the estimated degree of composite action was 68%. From both the test results and analytical modeling, the number of screws may be further reduced to 50% or less of the current amount, while maintaining a high level of stiffness. Future work includes testing the composite floor under different screw spacings, investigating the effect of concrete topping, and the connections between floor members and other structural elements.
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Experimental Investigation on Axial Compression of Resilient Nail-Cross-Laminated Timber Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2832
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Author
Nehdi, Moncef
Zhang, Yannian
Gao, Xiaohan
Zhang, V. Lei
Suleiman, R. Ahmed
Organization
Western University
Shenyang Jianzhu University
Editor
Billah, Muntasir
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
China
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Nails
Axial Compression
Nail-Cross-Laminated Timber
Slenderness Ratio
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Conventional cross-laminated timber is an engineered wood product consisting of solid sawn lumber panels glued together. In this study, the structural behavior of solid wood panels of Nail-Cross-Laminated Timber (NCLT) panels connected with nails instead of glue was studied. The failure mode and nail deformation of the novel NCLT panels under axial compression load using eight full-scale NCLT panels was investigated. The effects of four key design parameters, namely, the nail type, number of nails, nail orientation angle, and nail slenderness ratio on axial compression performance of NCLT panels were also analyzed. In addition, a formula for predicting the axial compression bearing capacity of NCLT panels was developed. For calculation of the slenderness ratio, the moment of inertia of the full section or the effective section was determined based on the nail type, number of nails, angle of nail orientation and number of layers of the plate. Results showed that specimens connected by tapping screws had best compressive performance.
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From Canada to the World: FPInnovations' Three-Generation Floor Vibration Research and Code Implementation

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2826
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Floors
Author
Hu, Lin
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Qian, Cheng
Dale, Angela
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Lumber Joists
Engineered Wood Joists
Mass Timber
Floor Vibration-controlled Design Method
CSA 086
National Building Code of Canada
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
InfoNote
Summary
FPInnovations’involvementinvarious codes and standards technical committeesaimsto monitor, contributeor propose changes for improvement as well as to create new standards to include new wood products and systems based on knowledge developed from FPInnovations’ research activities. Involvement also allows FPInnovations to be aware of any potential changes to codes and standards and to recognize and address threats and opportunities for wood use. Codes and standards exist to protect consumers but are written to reflect the current practices and knowledge based on a consensus agreement by committee members. FPInnovations’ involvement in codes and standards committees helps to align the coming changes with new wood products. This InfoNote reports on FPInnovations’ contribution to the floor vibration-control design methods on codes and standards implementation and research.
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Micro-notches as a novel connection system for timber-concrete composite slabs

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2841
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Müller, Katharina
Frangi, Andrea
Organization
ETH Zurich
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Journal Article
Material
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Connection Systems
Experimental Investigations
Sustainable Construction
Micro-notches
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engineering Structures
Summary
Timber-concrete composite slabs are more and more in use: the combination of timber and concrete combines the advantages of both materials and offer a valid solution for the increasing demand for sustainable construction. The connection between timber and concrete is the crucial element, yet its potential regarding material and time expenses is not exploited. This paper presents the novel connection system micro-notches, an interlocking concept between timber and concrete with indentations in the millimetre range. Micro-notches provide a continuous shear transfer without additional steel fasteners such as screws or dowels. The paper presents the development of the micro-notch concept in an extensive experimental program supplemented with analytical and numerical models, a calculation model, and practice-relevant guidelines. The results of the investigations show that micro-notches feature an approximately rigid composite action between timber and concrete and a sufficient shear strength for the use in office and residential buildings.
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Nonlinear Static Seismic Response of a Building Equipped with Hybrid Cross-Laminated Timber Floor Diaphragms and Concentric X-Braced Steel Frames

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2761
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Steel-Timber Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Roncari, Andrea
Gobbi, Filippo
Loss, Cristiano
Organization
University of British Columbia
University of Trento
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Italy
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Steel-Timber Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Seismic Design
Hybrid Structures
Lateral Resistance
Semi-rigid Diaphragms
Load Distribution
Seismic Performance
Pushover Analysis
Nonlinear Static Analysis
Finite Element Model
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
Summary
Simplified seismic design procedures mostly recommend the adoption of rigid floor diaphragms when forming a building’s lateral force-resisting structural system. While rigid behavior is compatible with many reinforced concrete or composite steel-concrete floor systems, the intrinsic stiffness properties of wood and ductile timber connections of timber floor slabs typically make reaching a such comparable in-plane response difficult. Codes or standards in North America widely cover wood-frame construction, with provisions given for both rigid and flexible floor diaphragms designs. Instead, research is ongoing for emerging cross-laminated-timber (CLT) and hybrid CLT-based technologies, with seismic design codification still currently limited. This paper deals with a steel-CLT-based hybrid structure built by assembling braced steel frames with CLT-steel composite floors. Preliminary investigation on the performance of a 3-story building under seismic loads is presented, with particular attention to the influence of in-plane timber diaphragms flexibility on the force distribution and lateral deformation at each story. The building complies with the Italian Building Code damage limit state and ultimate limit state design requirements by considering a moderate seismic hazard scenario. Nonlinear static analyses are performed adopting a finite-element model calibrated based on experimental data. The CLT-steel composite floor in-plane deformability shows mitigated effects on the load distribution into the bracing systems compared to the ideal rigid behavior. On the other hand, the lateral deformation always rises at least 17% and 21% on average, independently of the story and load distribution along the building’s height.
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A Numerical Study of the Stiffness and Strength of Cross-Laminated Timber Wall-to-Floor Connections under Compression Perpendicular to the Grain

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2839
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Akter, Shaheda
Schweigler, Michael
Serrano, Erik
Bader, Thomas
Organization
Linnaeus University
Lund University
Editor
Brandner, Reinhard
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Sweden
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Parametric Study
Perpendicular to the Grain
Elasto-Plastic Behaviour
Numerical Modeling
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
Summary
The use of cross-laminated timber (CLT) in multi-story buildings is increasing due to the potential of wood to reduce green house gas emissions and the high load-bearing capacity of CLT. Compression perpendicular to the grain (CPG) in CLT is an important design aspect, especially in multi-storied platform-type CLT buildings, where CPG stress develops in CLT floors due to loads from the roof or from upper floors. Here, CPG of CLT wall-to-floor connections are studied by means of finite element modeling with elasto-plastic material behavior based on a previously validated Quadratic multi-surface (QMS) failure criterion. Model predictions were first compared with experiments on CLT connections, before the model was used in a parameter study, to investigate the influence of wall and floor thicknesses, the annual ring pattern of the boards and the number of layers in the CLT elements. The finite element model agreed well with experimental findings. Connection stiffness was overestimated, while the strength was only slightly underestimated. The parameter study revealed that the wall thickness effect on the stiffness and strength of the connection was strongest for the practically most relevant wall thicknesses between 80 and about 160 mm. It also showed that an increasing floor thickness leads to higher stiffness and strength, due to the load dispersion effect. The increase was found to be stronger for smaller wall thicknesses. The influence of the annual ring orientation, or the pith location, was assessed as well and showed that boards cut closer to the pith yielded lower stiffness and strength. The findings of the parameter study were fitted with regression equations. Finally, a dimensionless ratio of the wall-to-floor thickness was used for deriving regression equations for stiffness and strength, as well as for load and stiffness increase factors, which could be used for the engineering design of CLT connections.
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Predicting the Human-Induced Vibration of Cross Laminated Timber Floor Under Multi-Person Loadings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2701
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Wang, Chang
Chang, Wen-Shao
Yan, Weiming
Huang, Haoyu
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Human-Induced Vibration
Multi-Person Loadings
Numerical Modelling
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Structures
Summary
The vibration of cross laminated timber (CLT) floor is closely related to human-induced loadings. However, research and prediction approaches regarding human-induced vibration of the CLT floor have been mostly limited to a single-person excitation condition. This paper presents new prediction approaches to the vibration response of the CLT floor under multi-person loadings. The effect of multi-person loadings on the vibration performance of a CLT floor was investigated through numerical modelling, experimental testing and analytical investigation. A finite element model was developed through a computational software to perform an accurate analysis of human-induced loadings. An analytical model was established to predict human-induced vibration of the CLT floor under multi-person loadings. Experimental tests were conducted to validate the numerical modelling. Results of both numerical modelling and experimental testing showed that the vibration performance of the CLT floor under multi-person loadings was almost double that under single-person loadings. Thus, multi-person activities are more likely to cause the occupants feelings of discomfort. A method for predicting the human-induced vibration of the CLT floor under multi-person loadings was then developed. The measured response, numerical modelled response, and predicted response were compared using an existing design metric, vibration dose value (VDV). The results were largely consistent. It is therefore concluded that the proposed prediction method will enable engineers to design timber floor systems that consider multi-person loadings.
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Acoustically-Tested Mass Timber Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2639
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Application
Floors
Walls

271 records – page 1 of 28.