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Composite action in mass timber floor and beam systems connected with self-tapping wood screws

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3010
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Natalini, Giulia
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Push-Out Tests
Bending Tests
Self-Tapping Screws
T-beam
Research Status
Complete
Summary
One of the challenges in mass timber construction is the design of efficient floor systems. This thesis focuses on studying composite T-beams, connecting Spruce-Pine-Fir Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) panels and Douglas-Fir Glued-Laminated timber (glulam) beams. In this study, three different types of self-tapping wood screws (ASSY SK, ASSY Ecofast, and ASSY VG), inserted at different angles, were investigated. Firstly, small-scale experimental tests were performed to investigate the strength and stiffness of the screws when submitted to lateral shear loads. It was found that the most promising fastener was the ASSY VG and that changing the angle of installation of the screws from 90° to the wood grain, to 45°, increased the strength and the stiffness of the studied connection. Secondly, full-scale composite beams experimental tests were completed to validate mechanistic-based and computational methods used to predict the effective bending stiffness of the composite T-beam. A degree of composite action achieved for the experimental T-beams was calculated through the studied methods. It was found that the studied T-beam achieved a moderately high percentage of composite action. Moreover, the methods were compared in terms of prediction accuracy, computational difficulty, required number of parameters, and versatility. Finally, parametric analyses were completed to gain insight into the structural performance of the composite beam when varying the number of CLT plies, the width of the CLT panel and of the glulam beams, as well as the length of the T-beam. Results indicate, conservatively, that the proposed connection, with a 3-ply CLT panel and a 130x190mm glulam beam, can be used to span 6m, maintaining a flange width of 2.8m. The results also suggest that with a 5-ply CLT panel and a 365x190mm glulam beam, it is possible to manufacture a 10m long T-beam that spans 3m laterally and supports live loads compatible with office use and occupancy.
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Free
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Experimental testing and analytical modelling of glulam moment connections with self-drilling dowels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3011
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Dong, Wenchen
Li, Minghao
He, Minjuan
Li, Zhen
Organization
University of Canterbury
Tongji University
Publisher
ASCE
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Beam-column Connections
Moment Capacity
Self-drilling Dowels
Experimental Testing
Analytical Model
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Structural Engineering
Notes
Accepted Version
Summary
An experimental and analytical study on rotational behaviour of glulam beam-column moment connections with self-drilling dowels (SDD) was conducted. Connection properties including strength, stiffness, ductility and energy dissipation were experimentally evaluated by testing seven full-scale connection specimens with and without self-tapping screw (STS) reinforcement along timber perpendicular to grain. All the connections showed high initial stiffness and high moment capacity when compared with the test results of bolted connections reported in literature. The unreinforced connections had relatively low ductility due to timber splitting despite the increased fastener edge distance. The STS reinforcement effectively reduced timber splitting tendency and encouraged the yielding of more SDD, leading to slightly increased moment capacity, but significantly improved ductility. A modified analytical model (MAM) was then proposed to predict strength and rotation of the SDD moment connections based on force and moment equilibrium of the glulam members. Improved prediction accuracy was achieved for the SDD moment connections when compared with the past analytical methods.
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Development of an Innovative Hybrid Timber-Steel Moment-Resisting Frame for Seismic-Resistant Heavy Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3012
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Author
Gohlich, Ryan
Organization
Carleton University
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Thesis
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Hybrid Connection
Self-tapping screw
Moment-resisting Connection
Dynamic Time-History Analysis
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This study assesses the seismic performance of a new hybrid timber-steel moment-resisting connection for mid-rise heavy timber structures. This system consists predominantly of timber members, but utilizes a steel yielding link at the beam-column joint that improves seismic performance by replacing connection components that are susceptible to brittle failure with ductile steel elements. The steel-to-timber connection was made using self-tapping screws. By localizing all inelastic behaviour to a single ductile component, design with high seismic force reduction factors becomes justifiable. Four connections were tested; a majority of the plastic rotation was localized to the link, high levels of ductility were achieved, and the steel-to-timber connections remained undamaged. A numerical study was performed on a hybrid frame using the proposed connection, and an equivalent steel-only frame. Results showed that drifts and accelerations remained within allowable limits, indicating that well-detailed hybrid connections can result in seismic performance similar to steel-only frames.
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Free
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In-Situ and Predicted Performance of a Certified Industrial Passive House Building under Future Climate Scenarios

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2979
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Environmental Impact
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Conroy, Alison
Mukhopadhyaya, Phalguni
Wimmers, Guido
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
University of Victoria
Editor
Dodoo, Ambrose
Wakili, Ghazi
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Passive House
Climate Modeling
Climate Change
Hygrothermall Behavior
WUFI
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
Summary
The Wood Innovation Research Lab was designed as a low energy-use building to facilitate the construction and testing of engineered wood products by the faculty and staff of the Master of Engineering in Integrated Wood Design Program at the University of Northern British Columbia in Prince George, BC, Canada. Constructed using a 533 mm thick-wall and 659 mm flat roof assembly, it received certification as Canada’s first industrial facility built to the International Passive House standard. Temperature and humidity sensors were installed in the north and south exterior wall assemblies to measure long-term hygrothermal performance. Data collected between 2018–2020 shows no record of long-term moisture accumulation within the exterior assemblies. Data collected during this time period was used to validate hygrothermal performance models for the building created using the WUFI® Plus software. Long-term performance models created using future climate data for five cities across Canada under two global warming scenarios shows favorable results, with an increase in average annual temperatures resulting in lower average relative humidity values at the interior face of the exterior sheathing board in the exterior wall assemblies.
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Free
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Creating Affordable Housing Opportunities with Mass Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2980
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Market and Adoption
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Spiritos, Jeff
Fernholz, Kathryn
Organization
Spiritos Properties LLC
Publisher
Dovetail Partners
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Report
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Affordable Housing
Business Development
History
Construction Techniques
Multifamily Light Frame
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Through a Wood Innovation Grant (WIG) from the USDA Forest Service, research was conducted to analyze the history of affordable multifamily housing in the US, and trace improvements along the way. The research summarized in this paper considered the issues facing the creation of affordable housing of acceptable quality at an acceptable price; the social, economic, and racial conditions facing the industry; and the problems created by the acute affordable housing shortage. This paper also presents 340+ Dixwell, a planned mass timber, passive house, affordable housing project in New Haven, Connecticut.
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Free
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Life Cycle Assessment of Reprocessed Cross Laminated Timber in Latvia

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2981
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Vamza, Ilze
Diaz, Fabian
Resnais, Peteris
Radzina, Antra
Blumberga, Dagnija
Organization
Riga Technical University
Publisher
Sciendo
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Life Cycle Assessment
Avoided Burden
Construction
Green Buildings
Eco-efficiency
Engineered Wood Products
Research Status
Complete
Series
Environmental and Climate Technologies
Summary
It is expected that Cross-laminated timber (CLT) and other engineered wood products will experience rapid growth in the coming years. Global population growth is requiring more housing units, at the same time the negative impact of construction industry cannot stay in the same level as today. Alternatives for concrete and steel reinforced structures are being explored. CLT has proven to be an excellent substitution for concrete regarding construction of buildings up to eight storeys high. In addition to much lower environmental impact, construction process using CLT takes significantly less time due to pre-cut shapes required for specific project. Despite mentioned benefits, there are considerable amount of CLT cuttings generated in this process. Due to irregular shape and small dimensions of these cuttings they are useless for further use in construction. By applying re-processing technology described in this paper, around 70 % of generated cuttings can be re-processed into new CLT panels. In this paper we are evaluating the environmental benefits of re-processing these cuttings into new CLT panels versus business-as-usual scenario with waste disposal. Life cycle assessment results showed significant reduction of environmental impact for the scenario of CLT cutting re-processing.
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Free
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Airborne and impact sound performance of modern lightweight timber buildings in the Australian construction industry

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2948
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Jayalath, Amitha
Navaratnam, Satheeskumar
Gunawardena, Tharaka
Mendis, Priyan
Aye, Lu
Organization
The University of Melbourne
RMIT University
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Impact Sound Transmission
Airborne Sound Transmission
Simulation
Research Status
Complete
Series
Case Studies in Construction Materials
Summary
Timber usage in the Australian construction industry has significantly increased due to its strength, aesthetic properties and extended allowances recently introduced in building codes. However, issues with acoustic performance of lightweight timber buildings were reported due to their inherit product variability and varying construction methods. This article reviews the recent literature on the transmissions of impact and airborne sounds, flanking transmission of timber buildings, and the state of computer prediction tools with reference to the Australian practice. An in-depth analysis of issues and an objective discussion related to acoustic performance of timber buildings are presented. Timber is a lightweight material and shows low airborne sound resistance in low frequency range. Attenuation of sound transmission with addition of mass, layer isolation, different products like cross-laminated timber and prefabrication are discussed. Challenges in measuring sound transmissions and reproducibility of results in low frequency ranges are discussed. Well-defined measurement protocols and refined computer simulation methods are required. The serviceability design criteria for modern lightweight timber applications in Australia need to be re-evaluated in the area of impact generated sound. Developing computer tools to predict airborne and impact sound transmission in lightweight timber buildings is quite challenging as several components such as timber members and complex connections with varying stiffnesses are non-homogeneous by nature. Further, there is a lack of experimentally validated and computationally efficient tools to predict the sound transmission in timber buildings. Computer prediction tools need to be developed with a focus on mid-frequency transmission over flanks and low-frequency transmission of timber and prefabricated buildings.
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Free
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Designing timber connections for ductility – A review and discussion

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2949
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Connections
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Ottenhaus, Lisa-Mareike
Jockwer, Robert
Drimmelen, David
Crews, Keith
Organization
The University of Queensland
Chalmers University of Technology
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Ductility
Design Codes
Performance-based Design
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
This paper discusses the design principles of timber connections for ductility with focus on laterally-loaded dowel-type fasteners. Timber connections are critical components of timber structures: not only do they join members, but they also affect load capacity, stiffness, and ductility of the overall system. Moreover, due to the brittle failure behaviour of timber when loaded in tension or shear, they are often the only source of ductility and energy dissipation in the structure in case of overloading, much like a fuse in an electrical circuit. This paper addresses current challenges in connection design for ductility, reviews selected best-practice design approaches to ensure ductility in timber connections, suggests simple performance-based design criteria to design connections for ductility, and aims to stimulate a discussion around potential solutions to implement safe design principles for ductile connections in future design codes and connection testing regimes.
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Self-camber of timber beams by swelling hardwood inlays for timber–concrete composite elements

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2950
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Moisture
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Author
Müller, Katharina
Grönquist, Philippe
Cao, Alex
Frangi, Andrea
Organization
ETH Zurich
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Moisture
Keywords
Self-Camber
Swelling
Serviceability Limit State
European Beech
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
Timber–concrete composites (TCC) are smart solutions for slabs in residential and office buildings regarding the sustainable and performance-optimized use of materials. However, a non-negligible disadvantage is the deflection of the timber elements caused by in-situ concrete casting during construction. This paper presents an approach to camber timber elements without external forces by using the innate swelling capacity of wood. Oven-dried hardwood inlays can be inserted transversally into cuts on the top side of a timber element. After an increase of the moisture content in the inlays, the swelling pressure will result in a self-camber of the timber element. In this study, a procedure for prediction of the self-camber is derived and the model is validated using an experimental test series. The results demonstrate that the self-camber of spruce elements using beech inlays is both feasible and predictable. On this basis, practical application scenarios for TCC elements in timber engineering are shown and discussed.
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Free
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Climate mitigation by energy and material substitution of wood products has an expiry date

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2951
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Environmental Impact
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Brunet-Navarro, Pau
Jochheim, Hubert
Cardellini, Giuseppe
Richter, Klaus
Muys, Bart
Organization
Universitat Politècnica de València
University of Munich
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Wood Product Model
Carbon Stock Change
Substitution
Sequestration
Dynamic Substitution Factor
Displacement Factor
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Cleaner Production
Summary
The expected increased share of renewables due to the ongoing energy transition may reduce the estimated potential mitigation effect of wood. Here, we estimated the climate change mitigation effect for five scenarios of wood products use in Europe applying dynamic substitution factors embracing a future energy mix with an increasing share of renewables in accordance with the emission reductions necessary to achieve the Paris Agreement targets. Our innovative modelling approach also included the elimination of eternal recycling loops, the inclusion of more realistic wood use cascading scenarios, and adoption of a more realistic marginal (ceteris paribus) substitution approach. Results show that the mitigation effect derived from material substitution is 33% lower in 2030 than previously predicted, and even 96% lower in 2100, showing its expiry date by the end of the century. Nevertheless, the mitigation effect of wood product use, in addition to mitigation by forests, may represent 3.3% of the European emission reduction targets by 2030.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Timber for future? Attitudes towards timber construction by young millennials in Austria - Marketing implications from a representative study

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2952
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Petruch, Markus
Walcher, Dominik
Organization
Salzburg University of Applied Sciences
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Timber Construction
Attitudes
Perception
Bioeconomy
Climate Change
Market Segmentation
Sustainable Building
Cluster Analysis
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Cleaner Production
Summary
As the mitigation of climate change becomes critical, the public perception of wood as a sustainable building material that can facilitate the shift towards a bio-based economy is crucial to consider. This study aimed to explore the attitudes towards timber construction among young millennials in Austria, a cohort that in the coming years will increasingly occupy decision-making positions and gain purchasing power. A representative online survey (quota sample, n = 757) was conducted to explore the attitudes of 20 to 29-year-olds towards timber construction and the forest-based sector. In general, timber construction was described positively in comparison to other construction methods, in particular, it was considered aesthetically appealing and ecologically advantageous. Indecisiveness prevailed regarding the role of wood in climate change mitigation. The industry’s current approach to advertising does not attract much attention. Doubts were expressed about the sustainability of sourcing wood as a building material and certain physical characteristics for building were perceived as a disadvantage. Four distinct market segments were then identified by means of exploratory factor analysis and a cluster analysis using Timber Construction Affinity and Opinion Leadership Wood as categorization factors. Two segments are essential for future marketing measures: Passive Preservers showed the most negative view of the industry, its practices and its offerings, while Active Supporters were in favor of increased wood use and actively promoted timber constructions among peers. Subsequently, marketing implications were given to develop “preserving” into “supporting” clusters and to further involve Active Supporters in the communication of wood and timber construction related topics.
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Free
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Water in Mass Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2318
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Oregon State University
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Vibration Testing
Non-Destructive Testing
Biodegradation
Structural Performance
Aesthetic Properties
Cracks
Delamination
Funghi
Insects
CAT-Scan Imaging
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Arijit Sinha at Oregon State University
Summary
This project will undertake a comprehensive analysis of the effects of water exposure, in various forms, on mass timber building elements. Water intrusion is mostly commonly seen during construction, but can also occur during failure of roofs or external facades or as a result of internal plumbing failures. The research team will employ CAT-scan imaging, vibrational testing, non-destructive and small-scale physical tests to assess the effects of moisture intrusion and any subsequent biodegradation on the structural performance and aesthetic characteristics of the building elements and connections. This analysis will include investigating the effects of cracking and delamination that may occur as a result of wetting and drying. The project will facilitate development of guidelines on moisture control during construction, help identify suitable methods for protecting mass timber products where required and highlight design features that can be used to mitigate the risk of fungal and insect attack.
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Wood Innovation Research Laboratory – Phase 2 (Monitoring of Passive House Certified Laboratory Building)

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2319
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Guido Wimmers at University of Northern British Columbia
Summary
The WIRL has a footprint of 30m x 30m on a raft slab foundation and consists of shop space equipped with a concrete strong wall and floor and a crane bay, as well as a portion of the building that will consist of a two-storey office space. The structural system will be predominantly wood with glulam post and beam with a set of trusses for the middle span. The building envelope and mechanical systems is high performance in order to achieve Passive House certification. This phase 2 is for the data acquisition and analysis from the building sensors and energy meters. A data acquisition (DAQ) system will be created to monitor the performance of the building over the next few years and store the data in an accessible, organized fashion. The building temperature, relative humidity and metering data will be used to evaluate if all the models and calculations created for the WIRL during the design phase are reasonably close to reality and if the high performance wood structure is as energy efficient as predicted.
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Virtual Reality for Better Energy Efficiency via Pre-occupancy Assessment

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2320
Organization
Université Laval
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Louis Gosselin at Université Laval
Summary
Post-occupancy assessment is widely known and allows evaluating the energy performance of a building after it has been commissioned to draw lessons for the future. The gap between the expected performance and the performance achieved is closely related to the behaviour of the occupants and the way they use the building and its systems. The project aims to develop a virtual reality testbed (Niu et al., 2017) to model occupant behaviour to enable a more energy-efficient design (Mieke et al 2017).
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Bonding Mixed Species for Advanced Biomaterials

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2321
Organization
USDA Forest Service Forest Products Laboratory, Michigan Technological University
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contacts are Xiping Wang at the Forest Products Laboratory, and Xinfeng Xie at Michigan Technological University
Summary
This project is expected to reveal if cross-laminated mixed hardwood and softwood species would have bonding properties similar to softwood CLT using commercial adhesives for timber laminating. The results will provide baseline data on adhesion properties of bonding mixed northern wood species.
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Engineering Performance Characteristics of Hardwood Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2322
Organization
USDA Forest Service Forest Products Laboratory, Michigan Technological University
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contacts are Xinfeng Xie at Michigan Technological University, and Xiping Wang at the Forest Products Laboratory
Summary
Two major outcomes are expected. First is the establishment of a technical basis for developing allowable bending strength and stiffness of hardwood CLT panels. Second is the development of models for predicting the mechanical properties of CLT products made of low-grade hardwood lumber.
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Development of a New Generation of Structural Composites

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2323
Organization
Université Laval
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Pierre Blanchet at Université Laval
Summary
It is reasonable to believe that a second generation of structural products will appear, bringing new properties and promoting the use of biobased materials in the construction of tall buildings. Among the possible development options, Corruven's Vcore and H-core products could offer second-generation material developments. The proposed project will be a product design project. A specification will be established and it will identify possible properties in the CLT structural multilayer product. Prototypes will be produced and tested to characterize them. An environmental characterization under development of the products will also be realized by applying the streamlined LCA method as proposed by Heidari et al. (2017). The optimized product will be fully characterized according to the application potential in the building (mechanical, fire, acoustic).
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Structural Bonding Conditions of Hardwood Used in Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2324
Organization
Université Laval
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Pierre Blanchet at Université Laval
Summary
Large volumes of hardwoods are available in Eastern Canada with qualities that do not meet the requirements of appearance wood products. There is therefore a real potential for the use of these in structural products such as glulam and cross-laminated panels. However, it appears that the laminations of these species are different from the softwoods for which the adhesives have been developed. In order to support the development of structural products using hardwoods, bonding conditions (roughness, porosity, pH, etc.) but also standard delamination tests (ASTM D905-2008, ASTM D52662013) must be documented.
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Assessing the Environmental Impacts of the Canadian Building Sector through Dynamic Life Cycle Analysis: Developing a Forward-looking Model for Greater Use of Wood Products

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2325
Organization
Université Laval, Napier University (Scotland)
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Pierre Blanchet at Université Laval
Summary
Several studies indicate that using wood from sustainable forest management in building construction both maintains or increases carbon sinks in the forest, temporarily captures carbon in buildings, and substitute more emitting materials or fuels. This strategy is interesting, but it is difficult to implement from a political point of view because its real benefits are complex to evaluate. There are several methods for evaluating the GHG impacts of a product over its entire life cycle, but there is no consensus on the method to be used to assess the impacts of GHGs from biogenic carbon - the carbon contained in living or dead biomass, such as wood. Many commonly used methods rely on simplifying assumptions that do not accurately assess the benefits that could accrue from increased use of wood products under construction. This PhD project will improve a promising method to evaluate the GHG impacts of biogenic carbon. Particular attention will be paid to the uncertainties of the method so that it provides all the information necessary for informed decision-making. The expected results could confirm that greater use of wood products reduces the environmental impacts of buildings, and that current methodologies are too simplified to inform policy making.
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Business Risk Factors in Wood Construction from Design to Commissioning

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2326
Organization
Université Laval
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Yan Cimon at Université Laval
Summary
CIRCERB (Chaire industrielle de recherche sur la construction écoresponsable en bois) has in the past mapped decision-making in public construction projects in Quebec. Using the same mapping approach, the project will highlight the steps in carrying out a timber construction project to identify hot spots where risk is important to the proponent, taking into account all stakeholders (material suppliers, general contractors, specialized contractors, etc.). In addition to presenting a broad picture of the wood construction, the project will identify the elements of the value creation chain on which optimization of business practices would be beneficial for wood construction.
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925 records – page 1 of 47.