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Case Studies of Risk-To-Life Due to Fire in Mid- and High-Rise, Combustible and Non-Combustible Buildings Using CUrisk

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue279
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Zhang, Xia
Mehaffey, Jim
Hadjisophocleous, George
Organization
Carleton University
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
High-Rise
Mid-Rise
Residential
Tall Wood
Office Buildings
CUrisk
Risk-to-Life
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In this project, CUrisk was employed to assess and compare the risk-to-life due to fire in mid-rise and high-rise residential and office buildings of wood construction and of non-combustible construction and to demonstrate how fire protection measures can be tuned to ensure a mid-rise or high-rise building of wood construction is as safe as a similar building of non-combustible construction. The computation results show that [...] Comparisons between the numbers of deaths and injuries of scenarios with and without suitable fire protection systems show the importance of fire protection systems in reducing life risk from fire in all buildings. Sustaining the reliability of fire protection systems through proper design, installation, inspection, and maintenance is important to achieve the life safety objectives.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Actuarial Contribution to the Understanding of Insurable Risks Related to Non-residential High-rise Buildings in CLT

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2194
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Université Laval
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
High-Rise
Non-Residential
Course of Construction Insurance
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Étienne Marceau at Université Laval
Summary
The objective of this project is to identify the risk factors taken into account in the pricing of an insurance contract for a construction site. This project aims to synthesize the quantitative approaches used in practice and presented in academic research for the pricing of home insurance and commercial insurance. Then, we aim to identify the preventive measures that can be taken to reduce the impact of different perils in the insurance of a construction site in wood or other.
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New Applications of Timber in Non-Traditional Market Segments, High Rise Residential and Non-Residential (Commercial) Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1934
Year of Publication
2009
Topic
Market and Adoption
Application
Wood Building Systems

Full-Scale Standard Fire Resistance Test of a Wall Assembly for Use in Lower Storeys Of Mid-Rise Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue347
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Fire
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Lafrance, Pier-Simon
Berzins, Robert
Leroux, Patrice
Su, Joseph
Lougheed, Gary
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Fire Resistance
Mid-Rise
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
A research project, Wood and Wood-Hybrid Midrise Buildings, was undertaken to develop information to be used as the basis for alternative/acceptable solutions for mid-rise construction using wood structural elements. As one approach, encapsulation materials could be used to protect the combustible (wood) structural materials for a period of time in order to delay the effects of the fire on the combustible structural elements, including delay of ignition. In delaying ignition, any effects of the combustion of the combustible structural elements on the fire severity can be delayed. In some cases, and depending upon the amount of encapsulating material used (e.g. number of layers), ignition of the elements might be avoided completely. This scenario would primarily depend upon the fire event and the actual fire performance of the encapsulating materials used. The effectiveness of the encapsulation approach in limiting the involvement of wood structural materials in fires was demonstrated in the research project through bench-, intermediate- and full-scale fire experiments.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Solution for Mid-Rise Wood Construction: Full-Scale Standard Fire Resistance Tests of Wall Assemblies for Use in Lower Storeys of Mid-Rise Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue346
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Author
Lafrance, Pier-Simon
Berzins, Robert
Leroux, Patrice
Su, Joseph
Lougheed, Gary
Bénichou, Noureddine
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Full Scale
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
A research project, Wood and Wood-Hybrid Midrise Buildings, was undertaken to develop information to be used as the basis for alternative/acceptable solutions for mid-rise construction using wood structural elements. The effectiveness of the encapsulation approach in limiting the involvement of wood structural materials in fires was demonstrated in this research project through bench-, intermediate- and full-scale fire experiments. These results for encapsulated lightweight wood-frame (LWF) systems and encapsulated cross-laminated timber (CLT) systems are documented in a series of reports [3, 4, 5, 6]. In addition to developing the encapsulation approach for protecting the wood structural materials to meet the above code intent, research was undertaken to examine standard fire resistance of encapsulated wood structural assemblies for use in mid-rise wood/timber buildings. One of the major differences between structural LWF assemblies used in mid-rise wood buildings (5-6 storeys) and low-rise wood buildings (= 4 stories) is the wall assemblies for the lower storeys. For mid-rise wood buildings, loadbearing wall assemblies on the lower storeys have to be designed to resist higher axial loads due to the self-weight of the upper storeys, which often result in the need for larger-size stud members and/or a greater number of studs, and higher lateral loads in case of seismic events or wind loads, which often requires the use of wood shear panels within the wall assembly. These wall assemblies very often will need to meet standard fire resistance requirements, and therefore, information regarding their standard fire-resistance ratings should be developed. This report documents the results of fullscale furnace tests conducted to develop standard fire-resistance ratings of encapsulated LWF assemblies for use in mid-rise applications.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Fire Loads and Design Fires for Mid-Rise Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1587
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Fire
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Ocran, Naki
Organization
Carleton University
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Residential
Non-Residential
Mid-Rise
Heat Release Rate
Fire Loads
Fire Resistance
CUrisk
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This study which involves the development of fire loads and design fires for residential and non-residential mid-rise buildings is part of NEWBuildS’ “Rationalization o f Life Safety - Code Requirements fo r Mid-rise Buildings” project. The project is focused on analysing the code requirements that relate to fire resistance and the use of automatic sprinklers for mid-rise buildings built with combustible or non-combustible construction. The ultimate goal of the project is to come up with alternative solutions and, potentially, trigger changes in the code requirements for mid-rise buildings. A review, compilation, and analysis of fire load survey data was conducted from available literature for residential and office buildings. A web survey of floor areas was also conducted for floor areas of mid-rise buildings. Fire loads and fuel packages for midrise buildings were developed based on previous surveys as well as the web survey. The fire load data in conjunction with statistical data was used to select fire scenarios from which design fire scenarios were chosen. The fire characteristics of the selected fuel packages, such as heat release rate, and production of toxic gases, were analyzed using the two-zone fire risk analysis model, CUrisk, in order to develop appropriate design fires for mid-rise buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Enable the Use of Mass Timber Products for Non-Residential Buildings in High Velocity Hurricane Zone

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2630
Topic
Wind
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Organization
Clemson University
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Topic
Wind
Keywords
High Velocity Hurricane Zone
Wind Load
Debris Impact Testing
Non-Residential
Commercial Buildings
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Weichiang Pang at Clemson University
Summary
The overall goal of this project is to enable the use of cross laminated timber (CLT) to construct commercial and other non-residential buildings in High Velocity Hurricane Zone (HVHZ). The 1992 Hurricane Andrew exposed the shortcomings of existing building codes. Recognizing this shortcomings, the Florida Building Code (FBC) incorporated new enhanced provisions which specifically require that the entire building envelope, including the wall and roof systems, must be impact resistant in HVHZ. Currently, CLT is not in the database of a list of building envelope products that comply with the HVHZ standard. The specific objectives of this project are (1) to qualify PRG-320 compliance CLT panels for HVHZ standard by conducting FBC debris impact and wind pressure cyclic tests; (2) to conduct education and outreach sessions to promote the use of CLT in HVHZ, and (3) to identify possible construction projects that may utilize CLT as the building envelope and promote the use of CLT in those projects. The test results generated in this project will be used specifically to gain HVHZ building code approval.
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Solutions for Upper Mid-Rise and High-Rise Mass Timber Construction: Infrared Imaging for Fire Risks

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2090
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Fire
Site Construction Management
Application
Wood Building Systems

Alternate Load-Path Analysis for Mid-Rise Mass-Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1233
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Author
Mpidi Bita, Hercend
Tannert, Thomas
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Alternate Load-Path Analysis
Disproportionate Collapse
Lateral Loads
Language
English
Conference
Structures Conference 2018
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 19–21, 2018, Fort Worth, Texas
Summary
This paper presents an investigation of possible disproportionate collapse for a nine-storey flat-plate timber building, designed for gravity and lateral loads. The alternate load-path analysis method is used to understand the structural response under various removal speeds. The loss of the corner and penultimate ground floor columns are the two cases selected to investigate the contribution of the cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels and their connections, towards disproportionate collapse prevention. The results show that the proposed building is safe for both cases, if the structural elements are removed at a speed slower than 1 sec. Disproportionate collapse is observed for sudden element loss, as quicker removal speed require higher moments resistance, especially at the longitudinal and transverse CLT floor-to-floor connections. The investigation also emphasises the need for strong and stiff column-to-column structural detailing as the magnitude of the vertical downward forces, at the location of the removed columns, increases for quicker removal.
Online Access
Payment Required
Resource Link
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Disproportionate Collapse Analysis of Mid-rise Cross-laminated Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2181
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Author
Tannert, Thomas
Mpidi Bita, Hercend
Currie, Neil
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Progressive Collapse
Robustness
Structural Integrity
Redundancy
Reliability Analysis
Mid-Rise
Engineered Wood Product (EWP)
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Structure and Infrastructure Engineering
Notes
DOI link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15732479.2018.1456553
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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10 records – page 1 of 1.