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Timber-Concrete Composite: An Alternative Composite Floor System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2749
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Collins, Leah
Publisher
Kansas State University
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Strength
Stiffness
Connections
Fasteners
Bending Stiffness
Stress
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The desire for sustainability has propelled innovation in structural engineering for much of the 21st century. Implement sustainable design without sacrificing the structural integrity of a building is important. The timber-concrete composite (TCC) floor system is an alternative floor system that offers superior sustainability and quick installation compared to other composite floors. TCC is comprised of a reinforced concrete slab connected to timber plate/beams by shear connectors that transfer the internal forces through the shear flow. To resist bending forces the reinforced concrete slab experiences the majority of compression stress and the timber plate/beam experience the majority of tension stress. Compared to an equivalent all-concrete section the TCC system has similar strength and stiffness as well as reduced weight.
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Design Method for Controlling Vibrations of Wood-Concrete Composite Floors Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1689
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Hu, Lin
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Chui, Ying Hei
Ramzi, Redouane
Gagnon, Sylvain
Mohammad, Mohammad
Ni, Chun
Popovski, Marjan
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Natural Frequencies
Deflection
Bending Stiffness
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4237-4245
Summary
Wood-concrete composite slab floors provide a promising solution for achieving long spans and shallow wood-based floor systems for large and tall wood buildings. In comparison with conventional wood floor systems, such long span and heavy floors have a lower fundamental natural frequency, which challenges the floor vibration controlled design. A laboratory study, including subjective evaluation and measurement of the natural frequencies and one-kN static deflections, was conducted on wood-concrete composite floors. Method of calculation of the composite bending stiffness of the wood-concrete composite floor is proposed. The design criterion for human comfort was derived from the subjective evaluation results using the calculated fundamental natural frequency and 1 kN static deflection of one meter wide strip of the composite floor. The equation to directly determine the vibration controlled spans from the stiffness and mass was derived. Limited verification was performed. Further verification is needed when more field wood-concrete composite floors become available.
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Valuation of the Composite Action of Lightweight and Prefabricated Concrete-Wood Floors for Multi-Storey Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2666
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Université Laval
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Finite Element Analysis
Span Limits
Shear Test
Bending Test
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Luca Sorelli at Université Laval
Summary
This project aims to develop a new precast wood / concrete floor system that can push the span limits in multi-storey wood buildings. The multidisciplinary methodology includes a finite element analysis technique using the “DDuctileTCS” software developed at CIRCERB, shear tests on connections, bending tests of the composite beam and an extension of technical standards for the design of composite structures. This project will develop solutions to optimize the composite action and vibration of long-span precast and mixed floors. The methodology consists of: (i) analysis of systems and optimization of shapes by numerical finite element techniques; (ii) connection shear tests; (iii) proof of concept on a prototype beam in the laboratory.
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Steel-Timber Versus Steel-Concrete Composite Floors: A Numerical Study

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1765
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Author
Keipour, Nicka
Valipour, Hamid
Bradford, Mark
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Screws
Finite Element Model
Load Carrying Capacity
Strength
Stiffness
Composite Action
Brittle Failure
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5208-5216
Summary
Concrete is the most widely used construction material in the world. This material causes formation and release of CO2 and high energy consumption during manufacturing. One way to decrease concrete consumption negative consequences is to replace it with lower needed primary energy materials, like timber. The engineered wood products such as laminated veneer lumber (LVL)...
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Long-term Performance of Timber Concrete Composite Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2081
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Serviceability
Mechanical Properties
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Application
Floors

Performance of Notched Connectors for CLT-Concrete Composite Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2656
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Van Thai, Minh
Ménard, Sylvain
Elachachi, Sidi Mohammed
Galimard, Philippe
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Notched Connections
Finite Element Model
Connectors
Deconstructable Connections
Screw
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
Summary
CLT-concrete composite floor systems are a solution for timber buildings with a long-span floor. It yields a reduction of carbon footprint and even eco-friendly structure at the end of its service life. This study will evaluate the structural performance of notched connectors in the CLT-concrete composite floor, comprised of the serviceability stiffness, maximum load, and behavior at failure. The parameters of the test plan are the loaded edge length, the notch depth, the concrete thickness, and the screw length. Other secondary variables are also assessed, such as different loading sequences, speed of test, and timber moisture content. Experimental results prove that the performance of the connector depends significantly but not linearly on the notch depth and the length of the loaded edge. The connector with a deeper notch and a shorter heel will be stiffer and more robust, but it also tends to have a brittle rupture. The test results also help validate a solution for deconstructable connector systems. A nonlinear finite element model of the connector is built and validated versus the experimental results. It yields reasonably good predictions in terms of resistance and can capture the load-slip relationship.
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Commentary: The Potential for Multi-Span Continuous Timber-Concrete Composite Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2187
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Sebastian, Wendel
Lawrence, Andrew
Smith, Andy
Publisher
ICE Publishing
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
TCC
Research Needs
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Construction Materials
Notes
DOI link: https://doi.org/10.1680/jstbu.171.9.661
Summary
As the only renewable construction material, and owing to the superior specific stiffnesses and strengths of the different species, timber has been used in major load bearing applications for thousands of years. The advent of waterproof adhesives during World War II and recent advances in manufacturing have combined to exploit the ease of forming and machining this material, leading to various forms of engineered timber including glulam, laminated veneer lumber (LVL) and cross-laminated timber (CLT). Manufactured in lightweight modules that are easily transported, then quickly craned into position and connected to produce eye-catching structures, engineered timber provides cost-effective alternatives (with minimal numbers and complexity of connections) to conventional materials for rapid construction of affordable residential and office spaces in busy city centres.
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Free
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Design Guide for Timber-Concrete Composite Floors in Canada

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2460
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Acoustics and Vibration
Fire
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book/Guide
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Acoustics and Vibration
Fire
Keywords
Shear Connection
Ultimate Limit States
Vibration
Fire Resistance
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
As part of its research work on wood buildings, FPInnovations has recently launched a Design Guide for Timber-Concrete Composite Floors in Canada. This technique, far from being new, could prove to be a cost-competitive solution for floors with longer-span since the mechanical properties of the two materials act in complementarity. Timber-concrete systems consist of two distinct layers, a timber layer and a concrete layer (on top), joined together by shear connectors. The properties of both materials are then better exploited since tension forces from bending are mainly resisted by the timber, while compression forces from bending are resisted by the concrete. This guide, which contains numerous illustrations and formulas to help users better plan their projects, addresses many aspects of the design of timber-concrete composite floors, for example shear connection systems, ultimate limit state design, vibration and fire resistance of floors, and much more.
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Free
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Investigations on the Slip Modulus of a Notched Connection in Timber-Concrete Composite Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1702
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Kudla, Katrin
Mönch, Simon
Kuhlmann, Ulrike
Volk, David
Götz, Tobias
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Slip Modulus
Notched Connections
Push-Out Tests
Failure Mode
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4386-4394
Summary
For the design of timber-concrete composite (TCC) elements with notches, the slip modulus Kser represents an important property of the connection. In this paper available research results were gathered and further experimental tests were carried out in order to define the slip modulus of a notched connection. Therefore experimental...
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Timber Concrete Composite Floors with Cross Laminated Timber - Structural Behavior & Design

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2723
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Forsberg, Albin
Farbäck, Filip
Publisher
Lund University
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Sweden
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
TCC
Timber Composites
Structural Behavior
Design Methods
Gamma Method
Equivalent Gamma Method
Extended Gamma Method
RFEM
First Natural Frequency
Serviceability Limit State
Ultimate Limit State
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Due to the increasing environmental awareness, the transition pace to renewable materials has increased, and the use of timber in construction is no exception. However, using timber in high rise building applications comes with structural challenges, e.g dynamic issues originating from timber being lightweight compared to conventional building materials. Some of the structural challenges with timber can be resolved by the implementation of Timber Concrete Composites (TCC), which increases the effective bending stiffness by adding a concrete layer connected to the underlying timber floor. Furthermore, the higher self-weight of concrete contributes to improved dynamic performance. Despite the fact that the TCC floor is a versatile and quite common structural design solution in Europe, the TCC knowledge in the Swedish construction industry is limited. The main scope of the thesis is to raise this knowledge of TCC by studying the structural behavior and develop applicable design methods. Both analytical design methods and FE-modelling are addressed. The content is limited to TCC floors with a 5-layer Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) section, with use of notches or screws as shear connectors. In CLT design, the Gamma method is commonly used and applicable to a CLT layup up to 5 layers. This method can, by a slight modification, be applicable for TCC sections with a 5-layer CLT as well. The concrete layer on top is regarded as an additional longitudinal layer, flexibly connected to the CLT section. The Equivalent gamma method and the Extended gamma method are two modified versions of the conventional Gamma method, valid for TCC floors with 5-layer CLT sections. Each method determines the effective bending stiffness accurately, compared to FE-modelling and laboratory test results. The Extended gamma method has a more solid theoretical base compared to the Equivalent gamma method, and is considered the recommended design method. The simplified methodology of the Equivalent gamma method is theoretically questionable, hence its recommended use is for preliminary calculations only. The following concluding remarks can be drawn from the analysis of the structural behavior of TCC floors: - The shear connectors should be concentrated to areas of high shear flow, i.e. close to support, for optimal structural performance. - An increased ratio of timber in the longitudinal, load-bearing direction of the CLT section increases the effective bending stiffness of the TCC. - The concrete layer increases the effective bending stiffness due to the high Young's modulus. However, the high density of concrete entails a thin concrete layer thickness to achieve a light-weight and structural efficient TCC system, and the decisive optimisation factor is the ratio of mass-to-effective bending stiffness, m/EI.
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10 records – page 1 of 1.