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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Predicting the Fire Resistance of Cross-Laminated Timber Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1865
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems

Calculating the Fire Resistance of Wood Members and Assemblies: Technical Report No. 10

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2492
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Fire
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Beams
Floors
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Decking

Fire Resistance Testing of CLT Floor/Ceiling Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1721
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Ceilings
Floors
Organization
Oregon State University
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Ceilings
Floors
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Fire Resistance
Load Bearing
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Fire Resistance of Unprotected Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Floor Assemblies Produced in the USA

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2507
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Fire
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Wood Building Systems

Fire Resistance of Assemblies in Massive Timber Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2671
Topic
Fire
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Université Laval
Country of Publication
Canada
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Thermo-Mechanical Behaviour
Analytical Approach
Fire Resistance
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Christian Dagenais at Université Laval
Summary
The structural elements of a building must provide fire resistance in order to prevent collapse and to provide an escape route for occupants. The basic philosophy is that components that support elements with a degree of fire resistance must also offer the same degree of resistance. It is also assumed that the connections between these elements provide at least the same degree as the supported elements. Traditionally, heavy timber construction used ingenious construction principles and assemblies made of cast iron. With the advent of innovative fasteners (eg self-tapping screws), the principles of assembly have changed greatly and are now similar to a metal frame. So, several studies have been carried out in recent years in order to increase knowledge of the fire behavior of these assemblies (Audebert et al., 2012, Dhima 1999, Frangi et al. 2009, Peng 2010, Ohene 2014, Ali et al. 2014 , Moss et al. 2008). Although a significant amount of information is available in the literature, it often indicates short-term flammability resistance (± 30 min), which is largely insufficient for buildings having to provide a degree of fire resistance of at least 2 hours. The objective is to carry out a literature review in order to fully understand the factors influencing the fire performance of assemblies in wood construction. A model of thermomechanical behavior and a simplified analytical approach would have to be developed.
Resource Link
Less detail

Fire Resistance of Assemblies in Solid Wood Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2261
Topic
Fire
Organization
Université Laval
Country of Publication
Canada
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Fasteners
Thermo-Mechanical Behaviour
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Contact: Christian Dagenais, Université Laval
Summary
With the arrival of innovative fasteners (e.g. self-tapping screws), assembly principles have greatly changed and now resemble a metal framework. Although a significant amount of information is available in the literature, it often indicates short-term flammability resistance (± 30 min), which is largely insufficient for buildings that need to provide a fire resistance rating of at least 2 hours. The objective is to carry out a literature review to understand the factors influencing the fire performance of assemblies in wood construction. A modeling of thermomechanical behavior and a simplified analytical approach should be developed. Testing from an intermediate furnace is likely to be required to validate model assumptions.
Less detail

Preliminary CLT Fire Resistance Testing Report

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue377
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Full Scale
Fire Resistance
Type X Gypsum Board
Thermocouples
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
FPInnovations is involved in a large research project regarding CLT construction. One objective of this research is the creation of a design methodology for calculating the fire-resistance of CLT assemblies/construction. This methodology will foster the design of fire-safe buildings of wood or hybrid construction. In order to establish such calculation methods, a series of experimental tests has been undertaken. A total of eight full-scale CLT fire resistance tests have been conducted at the NRC fire laboratory where the panels were subject to the standard ULC S101 [1] fire exposure. The series consisted of three wall and five floor tests. Each test was unique using panels with a different number of plies and varying thicknesses. Some of the assemblies were protected using CGC Sheetrock® FireCode® Core Type X gypsum board while others were left unprotected.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Surface Burning Characteristics of V2 Stress Grade Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue398
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dagenais, Christian
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Flame Spread
National Building Code of Canada
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Advanced wood building systems form a significant market opportunity for use of wood in taller and larger buildings, which are currently required to be of non-combustible construction in accordance with provisions set forth in Part 3 of Division B of the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC). In order to evaluate the surface burning characteristics of massive timber assemblies, flame spread tests on CLT assemblies have been conducted in accordance with ULC S102 test method. Three series of 3-ply CLT panels of 99 mm in thickness, V2 stress grade as per ANSI/APA PRG-320 (i.e., manufactured with Spruce-Pine-Fir (SPF) lumber) have been evaluated for flame spread and smoke developed classification. Fully exposed CLT specimens (99 mm) provided much lower flame spread ratings (FSR of 40), when compared to thinner similar products.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Fire Resistance Tests on Cross-Laminated Timber Floor Panels: An Experimental and Numerical Analysis

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue153
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors

Solution for Mid-Rise Wood Construction: Full-Scale Standard Fire Resistance Tests of Wall Assemblies for Use in Lower Storeys of Mid-Rise Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue346
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Author
Lafrance, Pier-Simon
Berzins, Robert
Leroux, Patrice
Su, Joseph
Lougheed, Gary
Bénichou, Noureddine
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Full Scale
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
A research project, Wood and Wood-Hybrid Midrise Buildings, was undertaken to develop information to be used as the basis for alternative/acceptable solutions for mid-rise construction using wood structural elements. The effectiveness of the encapsulation approach in limiting the involvement of wood structural materials in fires was demonstrated in this research project through bench-, intermediate- and full-scale fire experiments. These results for encapsulated lightweight wood-frame (LWF) systems and encapsulated cross-laminated timber (CLT) systems are documented in a series of reports [3, 4, 5, 6]. In addition to developing the encapsulation approach for protecting the wood structural materials to meet the above code intent, research was undertaken to examine standard fire resistance of encapsulated wood structural assemblies for use in mid-rise wood/timber buildings. One of the major differences between structural LWF assemblies used in mid-rise wood buildings (5-6 storeys) and low-rise wood buildings (= 4 stories) is the wall assemblies for the lower storeys. For mid-rise wood buildings, loadbearing wall assemblies on the lower storeys have to be designed to resist higher axial loads due to the self-weight of the upper storeys, which often result in the need for larger-size stud members and/or a greater number of studs, and higher lateral loads in case of seismic events or wind loads, which often requires the use of wood shear panels within the wall assembly. These wall assemblies very often will need to meet standard fire resistance requirements, and therefore, information regarding their standard fire-resistance ratings should be developed. This report documents the results of fullscale furnace tests conducted to develop standard fire-resistance ratings of encapsulated LWF assemblies for use in mid-rise applications.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.