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Hygrothermal Modelling Benchmark: Comparison of hygIRC Simulation Results with Full Scale Experiment Results (Report to Research Consortium for Wood and Wood-Hybrid Mid-Rise Buildings)

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1950
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Moisture
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Cornick, Steven
van Reenen, David
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Hygrothermal Models
Drying Rate
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Mid-Rise Wood Constructions: Hygrothermal Modelling and Analysis

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue6
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Abdulghani, Khaled
Swinton, Michael
Cornick, Steve
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Keywords
Damage
Load Bearing
Moisture Content
Simulation
Hygrothermal
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In general for both wall constructions simulation results tended to point to the exterior of the stud in the Lightweight Wood Frame (LWF) and Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) construction cases to be the area most at risk, specifically toward the exterior surface of the stud. Generally the total Moisture Content (MC) of the stud decreased to an acceptable level within the simulation period however the exterior surface appeared to remain at relatively high of moisture content level for significant periods of time. The presence of wood strapping covering the exterior face of the stud seemed to exacerbate the situation. If a support system for the cladding can be designed that does not rely on wood strapping or covers a minimum area of the stud the performance of this critical area could be improved. If the initial moisture content of the wood materials could be reduced before close up the performance would also be improved for all locations that did not show an increase in moisture content and the RHT index in the second year, at least with respect to computer modelling. This work however was not in scope of the work.
Online Access
Free
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Mid-Rise Wood: Characterization of Hygrothermal Properties

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue49
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Mukhopadhyaya, Phalguni
Bundalo-Perc, Sladana
van Reenen, David
Wang, Jasmine
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Keywords
Envelope
Exterior Walls
Hygrothermal
Mid-Rise
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
To evaluate the building envelope performance of the generic exterior wall assemblies developed for use in mid-rise wood buildings, hygrothermal properties of materials used in the assemblies are needed as input data for hygrothermal modelling. Hygrothermal properties were developed for fire retardant treated plywood, regular gypsum sheathing, spray polyurethane foam and cross-laminated timber. This report documents results of the hygrothermal property determinations. The objective of this part of the research project was to generate a set of reliable and representative data on hygrothermal properties of a number of selected building materials as mentioned below. 1. D-Blaze Treated Plywood 2. Dricon Treated Plywood 3. Gypsum Sheathing 4. Closed Cell Spray Polyurethane Foam Insulation (Purple in Colour)
Online Access
Free
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Climatological Analysis for Hygrothermal Performance Evaluation: Mid-Rise Wood

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue755
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Moisture
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Cornick, Steve
Swinton, Michael
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Climate
Hygrothermal
Mid-Rise
Moisture Content
National Building Code of Canada
Water Penetration
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The objective of the task is to select, from the 679 locations in Table C-2 of the 2010 National Building Code of Canada (NBC 2010) [1], several representative locations for which long-term historical weather data exists. This information from these locations can subsequently be used to determine the exterior boundary conditions for input files for hygrothermal simulation programs and hygrothermal testing in the laboratory. This report discusses the selection of locations for the hygrothermal simulation task of the project on Mid-rise Wood Buildings and the determination of spray-rates and pressure differentials for the water penetration testing portion of the project.
Online Access
Free
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Building Envelope Summary: Hygrothermal Assessment of Systems for Mid-Rise Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue250
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Abdulghani, Khaled
Cornick, Steve
Di Lenardo, Bruno
Ganapathy, Gnanamurugan
Lacasse, Michael
Maref, Wahid
Moore, Travis
Mukhopadhyaya, Phalguni
Nicholls, Mike
Saber, Hamed
Swinton, Michael
van Reenen, David
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Moisture
Keywords
National Building Code of Canada
Mid-Rise
Building Envelopes
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The role of the building envelope research team in this project was to assess whether midrise wood-frame (LWF) and cross-laminated timber (CLT) building envelope solutions developed by the fire research team to meet the fire provisions of the National Building Code (NBC) 2010 Part 3 Fire Protection, would also meet the NBC Part 5 Environmental Separation requirements relating to the protection of the building envelope from excessive moisture and water accumulation. As well, these wood-based mid-rise envelope solutions were to be assessed for their ability to meet Part 3 Building Envelope of the National Energy Code for Buildings (NECB) 2011. Requirements relating to heat, air, moisture, and precipitation (HAMP) control by the building envelope are included in Part 5 Environmental Separation of the NBC 2010. Part 5 addresses all building types and occupancies referred to in Part 3, but unlike requirements for fire protection, this section of the code was written more recently and is generic, including requirements that are more objective-oriented rather than prescriptive requirements pegged to specific constructions systems. The investigated methodologies developed and adapted for this study took those code characteristics into account.
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Advanced Topics in Seismic Analysis and Design of Mid-Rise Wood-Frame Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1773
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Ni, Chun
Popovski, Marjan
Wang, Jasmine
Karacabeyli, Erol
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Dynamic Analysis
Deflection
Diaphragm
National Building Code of Canada
Capacity-Based Design
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5343-5351
Summary
The following topics in the field of seismic analysis and design of mid-rise (5- and 6-storey) wood-frame buildings are included in this paper: Determination of the building period, linear dynamic analysis of wood-frame structures, deflections of stacked multi-storey shearwalls, diaphragm classification, capacity-based design for woodframe...
Online Access
Free
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Preliminary Assessment of Hygrothermal Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber Wall Assemblies Using Hygrothermal Models

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2628
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Moisture
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Wang, J.
Baldracchi, P.
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2010
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Moisture
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Keywords
Hygrothermal
Moisture Performance
Rainscreen
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Preliminary simulation was carried out using hygIRC and WUFI, both 1-D hygrothermal models, to analyze moisture performance of rainscreened wood-frame walls and cross-laminated timber (CLT) walls for the climates in Vancouver and Calgary. The major results are as follows. In order to provide baseline knowledge, preliminary comparisons between hygIRC and WUFI were conducted to investigate the effects of climate data, wall orientations and rain intrusion on the performance of the rainscreened wood-frame walls based on Vancouver’s climate. hygIRC tended to produce almost constant moisture content (MC) of the plywood sheathing throughout a year but WUFI showed greater variations, particularly when the ventilation of the rainscreen cavity was neglected. Rainscreen cavity ventilation provided dramatic drying potentials for wall assemblies based on the WUFI simulation. hygIRC indicated that east-facing walls had the highest moisture load, but the differences between orientations seemed negligible in WUFI when the rainscreen cavity ventilation was taken into account. When 1% of wind-driven rain was simulated as an additional moisture load, hygIRC suggested that the rainscreen walls could not dry out in Vancouver, WUFI, however, indicated that they could dry to a safe MC level in the summer. The discrepancies in material property data between the two models and between different databases in WUFI (even for the same wood species) were found to be very large. In terms of wood sorption data, large differences existed at near-saturated RH levels. This is a result of using pressure-plate/membrane methods for measuring material equilibrium moisture content (EMC) under high RH conditions. The EMC of wood at near-100% RH conditions measured with these methods can be higher than 200%, suggesting wood in construction would decay without liquid water intrusion or severe vapour condensation. The pressure-plate/membrane methods also appeared to be highly species-dependent, and have higher EMC at a certain RH level for less permeable species, from which it is relatively difficult to remove water during the measurement. The hygrothermal simulation in this work suggested that such a species bias caused by testing methods could put impermeable species (most Canadian species) at a disadvantage to permeable species like southern pine during related durability design of building assemblies. In terms of using CLT for construction in Vancouver and Calgary, the WUFI simulations suggested that the use of less permeable materials such as EPS (expanded polystyrene insulation), XPS (extruded polystyrene insulation), self-adhered bituminous membrane and polyethylene in wall assemblies reduced the ability of the walls to dry. On the other hand, permeable assemblies such as those using relatively permeable insulation like semi-rigid mineral wool (rock wool) as exterior insulation, instead of less permeable exterior insulation materials, would help walls dry. The simulation also suggested that using CLT products with initially low MC would significantly reduce moisture-related risks, which indicated the importance of protecting CLT and avoiding wetting during transportation and construction. In addition, the simulation found that indoor relative humidity (RH) conditions generated by the indoor RH prediction models included in hygIRC and WUFI varied greatly under the same basic climate and building conditions. The intermediate method specified in ASHRAE Standard 160 P resulted in long periods of saturated RH conditions throughout a year for the Vancouver climate, which may not be representative of ordinary residential buildings in Vancouver. The simulation in this study is preliminary and exploratory. It would be arbitrary to recommend one model over the other based on this report or use the simulation results directly for CLT wall assembly design without consultation with building science specialists. However, this work revealed more opportunities for close collaborations between the wood science and the building science communities. More work should be carried out to develop appropriate testing methods and assemble material property data for hygrothermal simulation of wood-based building assemblies. Model improvement and field verification are also strongly recommended, particularly for new building systems such as CLT constructions.
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Free
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Advanced Wood-Based Solutions for Mid-Rise and High-Rise Construction: Analytical Models for Balloon-Type CLT Shear Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1877
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Chen, Zhiyong
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Popovski, Marjan
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Lateral Loads
Shear
Mass Timber
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Lack of research and design information for the seismic performance of balloon-type CLT shear walls prevents CLT from being used as an acceptable solution to resist seismic loads in balloon-type mass-timber buildings. To quantify the performance of balloon-type CLT structures subjected to lateral loads and create the research background for future code implementation of balloon-type CLT systems in CSA O86 and NBCC, FPInnovations initiated a project to determine the behaviour of balloon-type CLT construction. A series of tests on balloon-type CLT walls and connections used in these walls were conducted. Analytical models were developed based on engineering principles and basic mechanics to predict the deflection and resistance of the balloon-type CLT shear walls. This report covers the work related to development of the analytical models and the tests on balloon-type CLT walls that the models were verified against.
Online Access
Free
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Solutions for Mid-Rise Wood Construction: Full-Scale Standard Fire Test for Exterior Wall Assembly Using a Simulated Cross-Laminated Timber Wall Assembly with Interior Fire-Retardant-Treated Plywood Sheathing

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue743
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Gibbs, Eric
Taber, Bruce
Lougheed, Gary
Su, Joseph
Bénichou, Noureddine
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Exterior Wall
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
One of the tasks in the project, Wood and Wood-Hybrid Midrise Buildings, was to develop further information and data for use in developing generic exterior wall systems for use in mid-rise buildings using either lightweight wood frame or cross-laminated timber as the structural elements. This report describes a standard full-scale exterior wall fire test conducted on October 30, 2012 on a simulated cross-laminated timber (CLT) wall assembly with an attached insulated lightweight wood frame assembly protected using interior fire-retardant-treated (FRT) plywood sheathing. The test was conducted in accordance with CAN/ULC-S134 [3].
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Advanced Wood-Based Solutions for Mid-Rise and High-Rise Construction: Modelling of Timber Connections Under Force and Fire

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1473
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Connections
Fire
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Chen, Zhiyong
Ni, Chun
Dagenais, Christian
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Connections
Fire
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Finite Element Model
Bolted Connection
Load-Displacement Curves
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
FPInnovations carried out a survey with consultants and researchers on the use of analytical models and software packages related to the analysis and design of mass timber buildings. The responses confirmed that a lack of suitable models and related information for material properties of timber connections was creating an impediment to the design and construction of this type of buildings. Furthermore, there is currently a lack of computer models and expertise for carrying out performance-based design for wood buildings, in particular seismic and/or fire performance design. In this study, a sophisticated constitutive model for wood-based composite material under stress and temperature was developed. This constitutive model was programmed into a user-subroutine which can be added to most general-purpose finite element software. The developed model was validated with test results of a laminated veneer lumber (LVL) beam and glulam bolted connection under force and/or fire.
Online Access
Free
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10 records – page 1 of 1.