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Ambient Vibration Testing and Modal Analysis of Multi-Storey Cross Laminated Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue237
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Wind
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Reynolds, Thomas
Bolmsvik, Åsa
Vessby, Johan
Chang, Wen-Shao
Harris, Richard
Bawcombe, Jonathan
Bregulla, Julie
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Wind
Serviceability
Keywords
Modal Properties
Multi-Storey
Damping
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
The ambient movement of three modern multi-storey timber buildings has been measured and used to determine modal properties. This information, obtained by a simple, unobtrusive series of tests, can give insights into the structural performance of these forms of building, as well as providing information for the design of future, taller timber buildings for dynamic loads. For two of the buildings, the natural frequency has been related to the lateral stiffness of the structure, and compared with that given by a simple calculation. In future tall timber buildings, a new design criterion is expected to become important: deflection and vibration serviceability under wind load. For multi-storey timber buildings there is currently no empirical basis to estimate damping for calculation of wind-induced vibration, and there is little information for stiffness under wind load. This study therefore presents a method to address those gaps in knowledge.
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Ambient and Forced Vibration Testing and Finite Element Model Updating of a Full-Scale Posttensioned Laminated Veneer Lumber Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1103
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Seismic
Wind
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Worth, Margaret
Omenzetter, Piotr
Morris, Hugh
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Wind
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Full Scale
In Situ
Finite Element Model
Dynamic Performance
Language
English
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 13-15, 2012, Christchurch, New Zealand
Summary
The Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology Arts and Media building was completed in 2011 and consists of three seismically separate complexes. This research focussed on the Arts building as it showcases the use of coupled post-tensioned timber shear walls. These are part of the innovative Expan system. Full-scale, in-situ dynamic testing of the novel building was combined with finite element modelling and updating to obtain an understanding of the structural dynamic performance within the linear range. Ambient testing was performed at three stages during construction and was combined with forced vibration testing for the final stage. This forms part of a larger instrumentation program developed to investigate the wind and seismic response and long term deformations of the building. A finite element model of the building was formulated and updated using experimental modal characteristics. It was shown that the addition of non-structural elements, such as cladding and the staircase, increased the natural frequency of the first mode and the second mode by 19% and 24%, respectively. The addition of the concrete floor topping as a structural diaphragm significantly increased the natural frequency of the first mode but not the second mode, with an increase of 123% and 18%, respectively. The elastic damping of the NMIT building at low-level vibrations was identified as being between 1.6% and 2.4%
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Ambient Vibration Measurement Data of a Four-Story Mass Timber Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2211
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Mugabo, Ignace
Barbosa, André
Riggio, Mariapaola
Batti, James
Publisher
Frontiers Media
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Albina Yard
Ambient Vibration Testing
Operational Modal Analysis
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Frontiers in Built Environment
ISSN
2297-3362
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Guide for Wind-Vibration Design of Wood-Frame Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue379
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Wind
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Hu, Lin
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Wind
Keywords
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
Dynamic Properties
Ambient Vibration Tests
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
It is not surprising to see a rapid growth in the demand for mid- to high-rise buildings. Traditionally, these types of buildings have been dominated by steel and concrete. This trend creates a great opportunity for wood to expand its traditional single and low-rise multi-family building market to the growing mid- to high-rise building market. The significance and importance of wood construction to environmental conservation and the Canadian economy has been recognized by governments, the building industry, architects, design engineers, builders and clients. It is expected that more and more tall wood frame buildings of 6- to 8-storeys (or taller) will be constructed in Canada. Before we can push for use of wood in such applications, however, several barriers to wood success in its traditional and potential market places have to be removed. Lack of knowledge of the dynamic properties of mid- to high-rise wood and hybrid wood buildings and their responses to wind, and absence of current guidelines for wind vibration design of mid- to high-rise wood and hybrid wood buildings are examples of such barriers.
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Wind-Induced Vibration of Tall Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1105
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Wind
Connections
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Reynolds, Thomas
Chang, Wen-Shao
Harris, Richard
Organization
TRADA
Year of Publication
2011
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Wind
Connections
Keywords
Across-Wind Vibration
Turbulence
Along-Wind Vibration
Vortex Shedding
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Wind-induced vibration is an important design consideration in tall buildings in any structural material. The two main forms of wind-induced vibration - across-wind vibration due to vortex shedding and along-wind vibration due to turbulence - were taken into consideration when undertaking this study. Both types are addressed in Eurocode 1. This research summary discusses a study which, following a sensitivity study into the effect of stiffness and damping on wind-induced vibration, addresses a shortfall in current knowledge of stiffness in dowel-type connections. This type of connection is found in the glulam frame and CLT structures currently at the forefront of tall timber construction, and its behaviour was investigated by measuring and analysing stiffness and damping under oscillating loads representative of wind-induced vibration. This research summary covers a number of factors relating to wind-induced vibration which must be considered when constructing a tall timber building, such as how to assess connection stiffness under in-service vibration. The various conditions were then applied to a case study - the proposed Barentshaus building.
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In-Situ Testing at Wood Innovation and Design Centre: Floor Vibration, Building Vibration, and Sound Insulation Performance

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue284
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Hu, Lin
Pirvu, Ciprian
Ramzi, Redouane
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Natural Frequency
Damping Ratio
Static Deflection Testing
Vibration Performance
Sound Transmission
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In order to address the lack of measured natural frequencies and damping ratios for wood and hybrid wood buildings, and lack of knowledge of vibration performance of innovative CLT floors and sound insulation performance of CLT walls and floors, FPInnovations conducted a series of performance testing at the Wood Innovation Design Centre (WIDC) in Prince George, BC in April 2014, during construction, and in May 2015, after building completion and during its occupation. This report describes the building, tested floor and wall assemblies, test methods, and summarizes the test results. The preliminary performance data provides critical feedback on the design of the building for resisting wind-induced vibration and on the floor vibration controlled design. The data can be further used to validate the calculation methods and tools/models of dynamic analysis.
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Free
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Wind-Induced Vibrations in Timber Buildings—Parameter Study of Cross-Laminated Timber Residential Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1844
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Wind
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Edskär, Ida
Lidelöw, Helena
Publisher
Taylor&Francis Online
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Wind
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Dynamic Behaviour
Mass Timber
Natural Frequency
Acceleration
Comfort Properties
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Structural Engineering International
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Tall Timber Buildings—A Preliminary Study of Wind-Induced Vibrations of a 22-Storey Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2356
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Wind
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Johansson, Marie
Linderholt, Andreas
Jarnerö, Kirsi
Landel, Pierre
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Wind
Keywords
Deflection
Dynamic Properties
Stabilisation
Sway
Wind Loads
Tall Timber
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
During the last years the interest in multi-storey timber buildings has increased and several medium-to high-rise buildings with light-weight timber structures have been designed and built. Examples of such are the 8-storey building “Limnologen” in Växjö, Sweden, the 9-storey “Stadthouse” in London, UK and the 14-storey building “Treet” in Bergen, Norway. The structures are all light-weight and flexible timber structures which raise questions regarding wind induced vibrations. This paper will present a finite element-model of a 22 storey building with a glulam-CLT structure. The model will be used to study the effect of different structural properties such as damping, mass and stiffness on the peak acceleration and will be compared to the ISO 10137 vibration criteria for human comfort. The results show that it is crucial to take wind-induced vibrations into account in the design of tall timber buildings.
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The Lateral Load Resistance of Unclassified Cross-Laminated Timber Walls: Experimental Tests and Theoretical Approach

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1294
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Wind
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Wadi, Husam
Amziane, Sofiane
Taazount, Mustapha
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Wind
Keywords
Lateral Loading
Fasteners
Analytical Model
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engineering Structures
Summary
This paper focuses mainly on the mechanical behaviour of unclassified cross-laminated timber walls under lateral loading (seismic and wind loads). Unclassified wooden planks were used to construct the wall unit with an odd number of layers (three) for each wall, with the planks in each layer in a perpendicular relative orientation. In this research, an experimental study of large-scale timber walls was carried out with a view to determining the lateral load resistance. Diagonal struts, under tension and compression were employed on the cross-laminated walls to investigate the effects of these elements on the lateral resistance of the wall. A theoretical approach has been developed to describe the overall behaviour of the cross-laminated wall and to investigate the internal forces on the fasteners. The present work is then compared to Oriented Strand Board (OSB) panel designs. Based on the data and results obtained from the experimental tests, this study confirms, firstly, that cross-laminated walls without a diagonal strut have approximately double the horizontal strength of (OSB) npanels, secondly, that diagonal strut significantly increases the lateral load resistance of cross-laminated walls, particularly under compression conditions, and thirdly, the proposed theoretical approach shows similar performance to the average experimental test up to 100 mm of overall lateral displacement of cross-laminated timber wall.
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Vibration Response Modelling of Cross Laminated Timber Slabs

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1621
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Ussher, Ebenezer
Weckendorf, Jan
Smith, Ian
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Finite Element
Dynamic Response
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 2494-2501
Summary
Innovations in timber engineering have led to new slab systems built from engineered wood products like cross-laminated-timber (CLT). High stiffness of CLT can enable attainment of better vibration performances than is possible with traditional shallow profile-long span floors constructed from timber and other materials. However, realization of this depends on engineers being able to accurately predict effects various construction variables have on dynamic responses of CLT slabs. Past physical experiments have provided insights into those effects. However, testing is a very expensive and time consuming means of acquiring necessary knowledge. Discussion here addresses finite element (FE) simulations as a cost effective method allowing engineers to understand and assess relationships between design variables and dynamic responses of CLT floor slabs. Presented modelling techniques are verified by demonstrating close correlation between numerical predictions and experimental modal response characteristics of CLT slabs.
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Free
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10 records – page 1 of 1.