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Fire Safety Challenges of Tall Wood Buildings. Phase 2: Task 4 - Engineering Methods

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1212
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Brandon, Daniel
Publisher
Fire Protection Research Foundation
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Design and Systems
Keywords
Gypsum
Design
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Recent architectural trends include the design and construction of increasingly tall buildings with structural components comprised of engineered wood referred to by names including: cross laminated timber (CLT), laminated veneer lumber (LVL), or glued laminated timber (Glulam). These buildings are cited for their advantages in sustainability resulting from the use of wood as a renewable construction material. Previous research has shown that timber elements contribute to the fuel load in buildings and can increase the initial fire growth rate – potentially overwhelming fire protection system and creating more severe conditions for occupants, emergency responders, and nearby properties. The overarching goal of this project Fire Safety Challenges of Tall Wood Buildings Phase 2 (involving five tasks) is to quantify the contribution of CLT building elements (wall and/or floor-ceiling assemblies) in compartment fires and provide data to allow comparison of the performance of CLT systems against other building systems commonly used in tall buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Use of BIM and IPD for the Improvement and Management of Fire Safety in High-Rise Construction in Solid Wood

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2256
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
ETS (École de technologie supérieure)
Country of Publication
Canada
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Keywords
Risk Analysis
BIM
High-Rise
IPD
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Conrad Boton at ETS (École de technologie supérieure)
Summary
The objective is to explore the ability of new approaches such as Building Information Modeling (BIM) and the Integrated Design Process (IPD) to: provide a more favorable design framework for improvement fire safety in high-rise construction projects in solid wood; make the best constructive choices through a constructability study assisted by digital tools of virtual construction; perform more realistic simulations of fire behaviour to better analyze risks and implement more effective management strategies.
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Fire Safety of Buildings in Canada

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1866
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Su, Joseph
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Publisher
Society of Wood Science and Technology
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Fire Safety
Fire Protection
Fire Resistance
Performance Based Design
Building Codes
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood and Fiber Science
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Fire Protection Construction Sequencing in Mass Timber Buildings for Fire Safety

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2787
Topic
Fire
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Oregon State University
Country of Publication
United States
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Passive Fire Protection
Construction Sequencing
Fire Spread
Fire Dynamics
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Yelda Turkan, Oregon State University
Summary
Over the past decade, fires have caused significant losses, both financial and through loss of lives, in timber buildings during construction (USFA 2020). Buildings under construction or in development are largely unprotected as they are not yet equipped with active fire protection systems (sprinklers), and for those buildings that are not designed for exposed timber, multiple floors are left exposed at a time as the fire protection trade trails in schedule behind the erection of the mass timber structural elements. With the addition of Type IVA, B, and C in the 2021 International Building Code (IBC), the IBC also adopted stricter requirements for mass timber buildings under construction. Under-construction mass timber buildings require that the mass timber is protected with noncombustible material within four levels of any construction more than six stories above grade. However, limited research has occurred to demonstrate that this construction sequence results in the optimal balance of safety, property loss, and cost. The goals of this project are to: (a) develop a methodology to couple multiple commonly-used computational tools to evaluate the sequence of installation of passive fire protection in mass timber buildings under construction fire scenarios, (b) develop an analytical framework that can be implemented by industry to evaluate the risk and impact of fire protection construction sequencing on a job site while balancing property loss, cost, and life safety of construction workers due to a construction fire, and (c) identify knowledge gaps in fire dynamics in timber buildings that would increase the accuracy of predicting fire spread in mass timber buildings under construction.
Resource Link
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Needs for Total Fire Engineering of Mass Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1674
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bartlett, Alastair
Wiesner, Felix
Hadden, Rory
Bisby, Luke
Lane, Barbara
Lawrence, Andrew
Palma, Pedro
Frangi, Andrea
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Keywords
Fire Safety
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 3888-3897
Summary
Fire safety is widely perceived as a barrier to implementation of tall timber buildings, particularly for engineered mass timber buildings with significant areas of exposed timber and timber structural framing. This negative perception is exacerbated by a lack of scientific data or experimental evidence on a range of potentially important issues that must be properly understood to undertake rational, performance-based engineering design of such structures. With the goal of delivering fully engineered structural fire designs, this paper presents and discusses a framework for using scientific knowledge, along with fire engineering tools and methods, to enable the design of timber buildings such that, when subject to real fire loads, their performance is quantified. The steps in this framework are discussed with reference to the available literature, in an effort to highlight areas where additional knowledge and tools are needed.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Fire Safety Summary: Fire Research Conducted for the Project on Mid-Rise Wood Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue43
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Su, Joseph
Lougheed, Gary
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Encapsulation
Mid-Rise
Safety
Tall Wood
Exterior Walls
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Working in collaboration with the Canadian Wood Council and FPInnovations and in partnership with Natural Resources Canada and the governments of Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia, the National Research Council conducted a comprehensive research project, Research Consortium for Wood and Wood-Hybrid Mid-rise Buildings. This consortium project aimed to develop technical information that could be used to support acceptable solutions that meet the NBC’s objectives for fire safety, acoustics, and building envelope performance, in order to facilitate the use of wood-based structural materials in mid-rise buildings. The objectives of the Wood and Wood-Hybrid Midrise Buildings research project were to develop performance data and technical solutions in the areas of fire safety, acoustics and building envelope pertinent to the use of wood-based structural materials in mid-rise buildings, i.e. to develop an alternative solution to meet the 2010 NBC requirements for non-combustible construction for 5-6 storey (and taller) buildings. This project was intended to address the immediate needs for technical solutions for mid-rise wood buildings that do not compromise the minimum levels of safety and performance required by the 2010 NBC in the areas of fire safety and fire protection, acoustics, and building envelope performance.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Summary of the Fire Protection Foundation Report - Fire Safety Challenges of Tall Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue111
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Market and Adoption
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Barber, David
Gerard, Robert
Publisher
SpringerOpen
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Fire
Keywords
Research Priorities
Gaps in Knowledge
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Fire Science Reviews
Summary
With new engineered timber products such as cross-laminated timber becoming more prevalent, this study evaluated the current knowledge of tall timber construction to identify gaps in knowledge, and where if fulfilled, will provide a better understanding of the potential fire safety performance of tall timber buildings. The study identified a number of knowledge gaps, of which most were related directly to the new technology of engineered timber products that have resulted from the use of CLT. These included system-level fire testing, use of composite assemblies, CLT char fall-off and construction fire safety. The study concluded that the priority for future research should target three areas of research, being the contribution of exposed timber to room fires; connections between timber components and timber composite assemblies; and penetrations for building services.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Taller Wood Buildings and Fire Safety: Existing Evidence about Large Wood Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2095
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Fire
Application
Wood Building Systems

BIM-Based Code Compliance Checking for Fire Safety in Timber Buildings: A Comparison of Existing Tools

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2110
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Application
Wood Building Systems

Fire Safety Challenges of Tall Wood Buildings – Phase 2: Task 1 - Literature Review

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1215
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Brandon, Daniel
Östman, Birgit
Publisher
Fire Protection Research Foundation
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Heat Release Rate
Charring Rate
Compartment Fire Test
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Recent architectural trends include the design and construction of increasingly tall buildings with structural components comprised of engineered wood referred to by names including; cross laminated timber (CLT), laminated veneer lumber (LVL), or glued laminated timber (Glulam). These buildings are cited for their advantages in sustainability resulting from the use of wood as a renewable construction material. Previous research has shown that timber elements contribute to the fuel load in buildings and can increase the initial fire growth rate – potentially overwhelming fire protection system and creating more severe conditions for occupants, emergency responders, and nearby properties. The overarching goal of this project Fire Safety Challenges of Tall Wood Buildings Phase 2 is to quantify the contribution of CLT building elements (wall and/or floor-ceiling assemblies) in compartment fires and provide data to allow comparison of the performance of CLT systems against other building systems commonly used in tall buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.