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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Experimental Investigation of Self-Centering Cross Laminated Timber Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1654
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Ganey, Ryan
Berman, Jeffrey
Yao, Lihong
Dolan, Daniel
Akbas, Tugce
Loftus, Sara
Sause, Richard
Ricles, James
Pei, Shiling
van de Lindt, John
Blomgren, Hans-Erik
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Lateral Load Resisting System
Post-Tensioning
U-Shaped Flexural Plates
Limit States
Self-Centering
Strength
Stiffness
Interstory Drifts
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 3547-3554
Summary
This paper describes experiments conducted to develop a resilient lateral force resisting wall system that combines cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels with vertical post-tensioning (PT) to provide post-event re-centering. Supplemental mild steel U-shaped flexural plate devices (UFPs) are intended to yield under cyclic loading while the PT and CLT components remain undamaged until large inter-story drifts are experienced by the wall. The experiments were designed to explore various limit states for self-centering CLT (SC-CLT) walls, including their dependence on design variables and their impact on performance, and to investigate strength and stiffness degradation at large interstory drifts. It was found that the SC-CLT walls were able to re-center even after large drift cycles and the crushing of the CLT material was the governing limit sate for most specimens. A hierarchy of desirable limit states was identified consisting of UFP yielding, CLT splitting, PT yielding, and CLT crushing.
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Numerical Analysis and Its Laboratory Verification in Bending Test of Glue Laminated Timber Pre-Cracked Beam

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2426
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Kawecki, Bartosz
Podgórski, Jerzy
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Laboratory Tests
Damage
Finite Element Model
Pine
Softwood
Bonding
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Materials
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Lateral Performance of Cross-laminated Timber Shear Walls: Analytical and Numerical Investigations

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2425
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls

Numerical Model and Optimization for Cross-laminated Timber – Light Frame Wood Shear Walls Hybrid System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2416
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Flexible Polymer Connections for CLT Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2057
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Numerical Study of Pin-Supported Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Shear Wall System Equipped with Low-Yield Steel Dampers

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1267
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Ma, Siyao
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Low-Rise
Mid-Rise
Rocking Walls
Steel Dampers
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This thesis presents a numerical study of a novel rocking cross-laminated timber (CLT) shear wall system for low- to mid-rise constructions. The system takes advantage of the high in-plane stiffness of CLT coupled with low-yield steel dampers to control the rocking motion of the CLT shear walls during earthquakes. The low-yield steel dampers connected between two rigid CLT wall panels provide the mechanism needed to dissipate the earthquake energy. This concentrates the damage in the dampers, allowing the system to be repaired efficiently after major earthquakes. Numerical models of the CLT shear wall system have been developed using both OpenSees Navigator and ABAQUS software. Models of low-yield steel damper systems were calibrated using available experimental results. With the rigid floor/roof assumption, a simplified OpenSees model of the CLT shear wall system was demonstrated to be effective and reasonably accurate in predicting the response of the system under large excitations. Therefore, it is efficient and reliable to apply the OpenSees model to study the seismic response of CLT shear wall buildings. A case study of a six-storey CLT shear wall building located in Vancouver, Canada was studied; and, detailed parameteric studies were conducted to investigate the influences of the damper type (damper shear strength), number of dampers, damper location, different earthquake records versus target earthquake design response spectrum, and earthquake peak ground acceleration (PGA) on the building response. It was determined that an optimized damper design with comprehensive consideration of these five factors can provide a building with a small roof drift ratio, as well as minor damages on the dampers. Concepts and examples for connection design are also provided.
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Numerical Analyses of High- and Medium-Rise CLT Buildings Braced with Cores and Additional Shear Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1890
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
Polastri, Andrea
Pozza, Luca
Loss, Christiano
Smith, Ian
Editor
Cruz, Paulo J.S.
Publisher
CRC Press
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Panels
Multi-Storey
Analytical modeling
Language
English
Conference
International Conference on Structures and Architecture
Research Status
Complete
Series
Structures and Architecture: Beyond their Limits
Notes
Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Structures and Architecture (ICSA2016), July 27-29, 2016, Guimaraes, Portugal
p. 128-136
ISBN
978-1-138-02651-3
Summary
In the last twenty years CLT (cross-laminated timber) panels have become quite widely employed to build multi-storey buildings often characterized by the presence of many internal and perimeter shear walls. Building superstructures in which beam-and-column frameworks resits effects of gravity loads and core substructures and exterior CLT shear walls resist effects of lateral forces have been found structurally effective. Advantages of such structural arrangements can include creation of large interior spaces, high structural efficiency, and material economies. Here the behaviour of multi-storey buildings braced with CLT cores and additional CLT shear walls is examined based on numerical analyses. Two procedures for calibrating numerical analysis models are proposed and discussed here. The first approach is to use information from Eurocode 5, and the second approach is to use specifically applicable experimental data obrained through laboratory studies. Technically different ways of connecting CLT panels in order to obtain suitably stiff horizontal diaphragms are also presented.
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Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Mixed I-214 Poplar/Pinus Sylvestris Laminated Timber Subjected to Bending Loadings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2592
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Rescalvo, Francisco
Timbolmas, Cristian
Bravo, Rafael
Gallego, Antolino
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Poplar
Pine
Bending
Numerical Modelling
Non-Destructive Testing
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Materials
Summary
The structural use of timber coming from fast growing and low-grade species such as poplar is one of the current challenges in the wood value chains, through the development of engineering products. In this work, a qualitative comparison of the behavior of mixed glued laminated timber made of pine in their outer layers and of poplar in their inner layers is shown and discussed. Single-species poplar and pine laminated timber have been used as control layouts. The investigation includes destructive four-point bending tests and three non-destructive methodologies: finite elements numerical model; semi-analytical model based on the Parallel Axes theorem and acoustic resonance testing. An excellent agreement between experimental and numerical results is obtained. Although few number of samples have been tested, the results indicate that the use of poplar as a low-grade species in the inner layers of the laminated timber can be a promising technology to decrease the weight of the timber maintaining the good mechanical properties of pine. Likewise, the need for the use of the shear modulus in both experimental measurements and numerical analysis is suggested, as well as the need to reformulate the vibration methodology for non-destructive grading in the case of mixed timber.
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Linear Dynamic Analysis for Wood-Based Shear Walls and Podium Structures: Part 1: Developing Input Parameters for Linear Dynamic Analysis

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue740
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Ni, Chun
Newfield, Grant
Wang, Jasmine
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Deflection
Linear Dynamic Analysis
National Building Code of Canada
Stiffness
Floor Drifts
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Utilizing Linear Dynamic Analysis (LDA) for designing steel and concrete structures has been common practice over the last 25 years. Once preliminary member sizes have been determined for either steel or concrete, building a model for LDA is generally easy as the member sizes and appropriate stiffness can be easily input into any analysis program. However, performing an LDA for a conventional wood-frame structure has been, until recently, essentially non-existent in practice. The biggest challenge is that the stiffness properties required to perform an LDA for a wood-based system are not as easily determined as they are for concrete or steel structures. This is mostly due to the complexities associated with determining the initial parameters required to perform the analysis. With the height limit for combustible construction limited to four stories under the National Building Code of Canada, it was uncommon for designers to perform detailed analysis to determine the stiffness of shear walls, distribution of forces, deflections, and inter-storey drifts. It was only in rare situations where one may have opted to check building deflections. With the recent change in allowable building heights for combustible buildings from four to six storeys under an amendment to the 2006 BC Building Code, it has become even more important that designers consider more sophisticated methods for the analysis and design of wood-based shear walls. As height limits increase, engineers should also be more concerned with the assumptions made in determining the relative stiffness of walls, distribution of forces, deflections, and inter-storey drifts to ensure that a building is properly detailed to meet the minimum Code objectives. Although the use of LDA has not been common practice, the more rigorous analysis, as demonstrated in the APEGBC bulletin on 5- and 6-storey wood-frame residential building projects (APEGBC 2011), could be considered the next step which allows one to perform an LDA. This fact sheet provides a method to assist designers who may want to consider an LDA for analyzing wood-frame structures. It is important to note that while LDA may provide useful information as well as streamline the design of wood-frame structures, it most often will not be necessary.
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Numerical Analysis of the Bending Properties of Cathay Poplar Glulam

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1222
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Gao, Ying
Wu, Yuxuan
Zhu, Xudong
Zhu, Lei
Yu, Zhiming
Wu, Yong
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Finite Element Analysis
Modulus of Rupture
Modulus of Elasticity
Poplar
Cathay
China
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Materials
ISSN
1996-1944
Summary
This paper presents the formulae and finite element analysis models for predicting the Modulus of Elastic (MOE) and Modulus of Rupture (MOR) of Cathay poplar finger-jointed glulam. The formula of the MOE predicts the MOE of Cathay poplar glulam glued with one-component polyurethane precisely. Three formulae are used to predict the MOR, and Equation (12) predicts the MOR of Cathay poplar glulam precisely. The finite element analysis simulation results of both the MOE and MOR are similar to the experimental results. The predicted results of the finite element analysis are shown to be more accurate than those of the formulae, because the finite element analysis considers the glue layers, but the formulae do not. Three types of typical failure modes due to bending were summarized. The bending properties of Cathay poplar glulam were compared to those of Douglas fir glulam. The results show that Cathay poplar glulam has a lower stiffness, but a marginally higher strength. One-component polyurethane adhesive is shown to be more effective than resorcinol formaldehyde resin adhesive for Cathay poplar glulam. This study shows that Cathay poplar has the potential to be a glulam material in China.
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Free
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10 records – page 1 of 1.