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Thin Topping Timber-Concrete Composite Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue902
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Skinner, Jonathan
Organization
University of Bath
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Thesis
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Stiffness
Vibration Response
Topping Thickness
Screws
shear connectors
Static Loads
Cyclic Loads
Short-term
Bending Tests
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
A timber-concrete composite (TCC) combines timber and concrete, utilising the complementary properties of each material. The composite is designed in such a way that the timber resists combined tension and bending, whilst the concrete resists combined compression and bending. This construction technique can be used either in new build construction, or in refurbishment, for upgrading existing timber structures. Its use is most prolific in continental Europe, Australasia, and the United States of America but has yet to be widely used in the United Kingdom. To date, the topping upgrades used have been 40mm thick or greater. Depending on the choice of shear connection, this can lead to a four-fold increase in strength and stiffness of the floor. However, in many practical refurbishment situations, such a large increase in stiffness is not required, therefore a thinner topping can suffice. The overarching aim of this study has been to develop a thin (20mm) topping timber-concrete composite upgrade with a view to improving the serviceability performance of existing timber floors. Particular emphasis was given to developing an understanding of how the upgrade changes the stiffness and transient vibration response of a timber floor. Initially, an analytical study was carried out to define an appropriate topping thickness. An experimental testing programme was then completed to: characterise suitable shear connectors under static and cyclic loads, assess the benefit of the upgrade to the short-term bending performance of panels and floors, and evaluate the influence of the upgrade on the transient vibration response of a floor. For refurbishing timber floors, a 20mm thick topping sufficiently increased the bending stiffness and improved the transient vibration response. The stiffness of the screw connectors was influenced by the thickness of the topping and the inclination of the screws. During the short-term bending tests, the gamma method provided a non-conservative prediction of composite bending stiffness. In the majority of cases the modal frequencies of the floors tested increased after upgrade, whilst the damping ratios decreased. The upgrade system was shown to be robust as cracking of the topping did not influence the short-term bending performance of panels. Thin topping TCC upgrades offer a practical and effective solution to building practitioners, for improving the serviceability performance of existing timber floors.
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Free
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Mechanically Jointed CLT Panels for Wall, Floor and Timber-Concrete Composite Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue458
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Walls
Author
Kuklík, Petr
Velebil, Lukáš
Nechanický, Pavel
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Mechanical Joints
Mechanical Behaviour
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
Cross laminated timber (CLT) has become very popular for all types of structures all around the world in last years. CLT consists of uneven number of plank layers oriented in 90° angle to each other and bonded together. Various types of adhesives and technologies are used for bonding and manufacturing of final product. In some cases, gluing is not ideal manufacturing method and there is a demand of other manufacturing processes. Mechanical jointing is logical result of current research at the Czech Technical University. Research is focused on developing and verifying mechanical behaviour of mechanically jointed CLT solid wood panels. Sets of experiments focused on mechanical behaviour of these mechanically jointed CLT panels were performed. This paper summarizes results of wall, floor and timber-concrete composite elements, which have been tested.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Acoustic Performance of Timber and Timber-Concrete Composite Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue684
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Schluessel, Marc
Shrestha, Rijun
Crews, Keith
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
New Zealand
Australia
Building Code of Australia
Sound Insulation
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
A major problem in light-weight timber floors is their insufficient performance coping with impact noise in low frequencies. There are no prefabricated solutions available in Australia and New Zealand. To rectify this and enable the implementation of light-weight timber floors, a structural floor was designed and built in laminated veneer lumber (LVL). The floor was evaluated in a laboratory setting based on its behaviour and then modified with suspended ceilings and different floor toppings. Twenty-nine different floor compositions were tested. The bare floor could not reach the minimum requirement set by the Building Code of Australia (BCA) but with additional layers, a sufficient result of R'w+Ctr 53 dB and L’nT,w + CI 50 dB was reached. Doubling of the concrete mass added a marginal improvement. With concrete toppings and suspended ceiling it is possible to reach the goal in airborne and impact sound insulation. The best result was achieved by combining of additional mass and different construction layers.
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Free
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Seismic Design of Core-Wall Systems for Multi-Storey Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1149
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shafts and Chases
Author
Dunbar, Andrew
Organization
University of Canterbury
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shafts and Chases
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Core-Walls
Quasi-Static
Seismic Loading
Multi-Storey
U-Shaped Flexural Plates
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This thesis discusses the results of experimental tests on two post-tensioned timber core-walls, tested under bi-directional quasi-static seismic loading. The half-scale two-storey test specimens included a stair with half-flight landings. Multi-storey timber structures are becoming increasingly desirable for architects and building owners due to their aesthetic and environmental benefits. In addition, there is increasing public pressure to have low damage structural systems with minimal business interruption after a moderate to severe seismic event. Timber has been used extensively for low-rise residential structures in the past, but has been utilised much less for multi-storey structures, traditionally limited to residential type building layouts which use light timber framing and include many walls to form a lateral load resisting system. This is undesirable for multi-storey commercial buildings which need large open spaces providing building owners with versatility in their desired floor plan. The use of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) panels for multi-storey timber buildings is gaining popularity throughout the world, especially for residential construction. Previous experimental testing has been done on the in-plane behaviour of single and coupled post-tensioned timber walls at the University of Canterbury and elsewhere. However, there has been very little research done on the 3D behaviour of timber walls that are orthogonal to each other and no research to date into post-tensioned CLT walls. The “high seismic option” consisted of full height post-tensioned CLT walls coupled with energy dissipating U-shaped Flexural Plates (UFPs) attached at the vertical joints between coupled wall panels and between wall panels and the steel corner columns. An alternative “low seismic option” consisted of post-tensioned CLT panels connected by screws, to provide a semi-rigid connection, allowing relative movement between the panels, producing some level of frictional energy dissipation.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Multi-Storey Residential Buildings in CLT - Interdisciplinary Principles of Design and Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue500
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Ringhofer, Andreas
Schickhofer, Gerhard
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Design and Systems
Keywords
Moisture Ingress
Critical Building Zones
Efficiency of Construction
Multi-Storey
Residential
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a very efficient and powerful building material and thus recently discovered for the erection of multi-storey timber towers. In our paper, we focus on building science and services related topics regarding these constructions. Thereby, we firstly identify moisture ingress as main problem worsening their durability and thus discuss possible detail solutions for both external and internal critical building zones such as flat roof, balcony system and wet rooms. The second main topic we are concentrating in this paper are simple measures to increase the efficiency of CLT constructions by simplifying and improving their structural systems (floors, walls and connections). Both topics are connected by the major importance of interdisciplinary thinking and acting when building with CLT.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Timber-Steel Hybrid Beams for Multi-Storey Buildings: Design Criteria, Calculation and Tests

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue623
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Tavoussi, Kamyar
Winter, Wolfgang
Pixner, Tamir
Riola Parada, Felipe
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Multi-Storey
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
Timber-steel hybrid elements are structurally reliable, clean and fast to assemble and disassemble, light, ecologic and economic. Design criteria and a calculation model for beams were developed and a series of real scale tests were carried out in order to check their performance. The results proved to be satisfactory and promising for the final objective of building structural frames for different types of multi-story buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Against the Grain: Redefining the Living Unit – Advanced Slotting Strategies for Multi-Storey Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue795
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Kaiser, Alex
Larsson, Magnus
Girhammar, Ulf
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Manufacturing
Multi-Storey
CNC
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
Using Charles and Ray Eames’s famous 1950s House of Cards slotting toy as both design metaphor and structural precedent provides the starting point for a novel building logic (utilising three existing Swedish timber systems) that allows volumetrically slotted units to stack inside of and support each other. Contemporary computer-aided fabrication techniques based on evolutionary algorithms and CNC manufacturing strategies are used to produce a methodology for designing a kit-of-parts system at the scale of the skyscraper, based on the slotting together of cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels. A catalogue of novel slotting methods is produced, and a number of alternative slotted joint treatments identified that hold promising potential for further development, parametrically design and control volumes, understand the fabrication workflow and constructional sequence on site, and build prototypes of the chosen slotting configurations at scales ranging between 1:50 and 1:1.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Earthquake Resistant Design and Sustainability through Wooden Composites in Multi-Storey Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue148
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Ceylan, Aygül
Canan Girgin, Z.
Organization
European Association of Earthquake Engineering
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Turkey
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Multi-Storey
Canada
Italy
New Zealand
Wooden Structural Systems
Wooden-Hybrid Structural Systems
Post-Tensioning
Connections
Sustainability
Language
English
Conference
Second European Conference on Earthquake Engineering and Seismology
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 25-29, 2014, Istanbul, Turkey
Summary
In the past, while wood as a natural building material was preferred for only housing construction, today, engineered wood products are used as structural elements even in many different projects such as, schools, airport terminals, stadiums or indoor sport centres and finally in multi-storey houses nowadays. On the other hand, the sustainability is becoming a key focus. Engineered wood products are increasingly used for earthquake resistance as well as natural insulation and sustainable design. Recent studies indicate that the earthquake resistant design through engineered wood products is achievable and affordable. The seismic design of structures typically depends on the ductility of members and connections. The innovative design techniques with wooden composites ensure that the building is functional after a major earthquake event. Within the scope of this study, the earthquake resistant design approaches and experimental results of New Zealand, Canada and Italy are addressed for multi-storey wooden/wooden-hybrid structural systems. Member and connection types, posttensioning effectiveness, floor systems, sustainability and constructability will be focused.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Structural Characterization of Multi-Storey Buildings with CLT Cores

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue496
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Polastri, Andrea
Pozza, Luca
Trutalli, Davide
Scotta, Roberto
Smith, Ian
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Multi-Storey
Numerical model
Building Cores
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
The behaviour of multi-storey buildings braced with Cross-Laminated-Timber (CLT) cores and additional shear walls is examined based on numerical analyses of various 3-dimensional configurations. Two ways of calibrating numerical model are proposed according to codes and experimental test data respectively, including calibration of parameters that characterise connections between CLT panels in building cores and shear walls. Results of analyses of entire buildings are presented in terms of principal elastic periods, and base shear and up-lift forces. Discussion addresses primary issues associated with behaviour of such systems and modelling them.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Seismic Performance of Core-Walls for Multi-Storey Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue61
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Dunbar, Andrew
Pampanin, Stefano
Buchanan, Andrew
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Connections
Multi-Storey
Post-Tensioned
Quasi-Static
Half-Scale
Language
English
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
March 21-23, 2014, Auckland, New Zealand
Summary
This paper describes the results of experimental tests on two posttensioned timber core-walls tested under bi-directional quasi-static seismic loading. The half-scale two-storey test specimens included a stair with half-flight landings. The use of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) panels for multi-storey timber buildings is gaining popularity throughout the world, especially for residential construction. Posttensioned timber core-walls for lift-shafts or stairwells can be used for seismic resistance in open-plan commercial office buildings Previous experimental testing has been done on the in-plane behaviour of single and coupled timber walls at the University of Canterbury and elsewhere. However, there has been very little research done on the 3D behaviour of timber walls that are orthogonal to each other, and no research to date into post-tensioned CLT walls. The “high seismic option” consisted of full height post-tensioned CLT walls coupled with energy dissipating U-shaped Flexural Plates (UFPs) attached at the vertical joints between coupled wall panels and between wall panels and the steel corner columns. An alternative “low seismic option” consisted of post-tensioned CLT panels connected by screws, to provide a semi-rigid connection, allowing relative movement between the panels, producing some level of frictional energy dissipation.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.