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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Multifunctional Composite Wall Elements for Multistory Buildings Made of Timber and Wood-Based Lightweight Concrete

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1520
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Environmental Impact
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Walls
Author
Fadai, Alireza
Radlherr, Christoph
Setoodeh Jahromy, Sepehr
Winter, Wolfgang
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Walls
Topic
Environmental Impact
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Keywords
Lightweight Concrete
Energy Efficiency
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 613-622
Summary
This paper aims to discuss timber-wood lightweight concrete composites for application in wall components for buildings. The aim is to develop a multi-layer wall system composed of wood lightweight concrete, connected timber sections to gain and use advantages of each used material – lightweight, structural, thermal storage and insulation, ecological and economic benefits – to name the most important ones. The development of timber-wood lightweight concrete composites systems will lead to a new generation of polyvalent multi-material building components. By using renewable resources, waste products of the forest industry, and manufactured wood products, this technology provides statically and energy-efficient components for low-energy constructions. Such products support rapid-assembly construction methods, which use prefabricated dry elements to increase the efficiency of the construction. Wood-based alternatives to conventional concrete or masonry construction also open opportunities to reduce the carbon emissions.
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Wood Lightweight Concrete Composites Structural Elements: Ecological Impact

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1521
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Energy Performance
Environmental Impact
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Fadai, Alireza
Borska, Andrea
Winter, Wolfgang
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Energy Performance
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Energy Efficiency
Ecological Impact
Lightweight Concrete
Europe
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 623-631
Summary
Within several research projects and with the aim to optimize energy efficiency and ecological characteristics of structural building components the Department of Structural Design and Timber Engineering (ITI) at the Vienna University of Technology (VUT) developed several wood-based composite systems, which combine timber products with other conventional building materials and components. As a representative example for these developments, the application of wood lightweight concrete composites illustrates the extent of interrelationships in the development of complex system solutions when focusing on the increase of resource efficiency. The environmental assessment shows the ecological advantages of the developed concept compared to conventional concrete elements and underlines the potential for further developments. Assessment of structural wood-based wood lightweight concrete composites are illustrated in this paper.
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A Comparative Life Cycle Assessment of Two Multi Storey Residential Apartment Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue403
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Environmental Impact
Energy Performance
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Carre, Andrew
Crossin, Enda
Organization
Forest and Wood Products Australia
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Australia
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Energy Performance
Keywords
Australia
Life-Cycle Assessment
Multi-Storey
Residential
Concrete
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This study compares the life cycle environmental impacts of two multilevel residential buildings built in Melbourne, Australia. The study was commissioned by Australand and funded by Forest and Wood Products Australia (FWPA). The first building considered, the ‘Study Building’, incorporated an innovative light weight building approach utilising a stick-built timber frame and a ‘cassette floor’ building system. The second building, the ‘Reference Building’ utilised a more typical building approach, incorporating precast concrete panels and suspended concrete slab floors (Table 1). The primary goal of the study was to compare the potential environmental impacts of the above buildings across their respective life cycles. The study employed the LCA methodology described by the ISO14044 standard to undertake the comparison of the buildings. The analysis addressed a building life cycle scope which was prescribed by GBCA (GBCA 2014), which in turn based the boundary definition on the EN15978 standard, as shown in Figure 1. Although EN15978 was used to define the scope of the LCA, the study is not intended to be fully compliant with the standard.
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Comparison of Environmental Performance of a Five-Storey Building Built with Cross-Laminated Timber and Concrete

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue65
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Energy Performance
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Chen, Yue
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Energy Performance
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Canada
Concrete
Energy Consumption
Environmental
Mid-Rise
North America
Office Buildings
Passive Buildings
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross Laminated Timber (CLT), which is made by laminating dimension lumber at right angles, is an innovative high-performance building material that offers many positive attributes including renewability, high structural stability, storage of carbon during the building life, good fire resistance, possibility of material recycling and reuse. It is conceptually a sustainable and cost effective structural timber solution that can compete with concrete in non-residential and multi-family mid-rise building market. Therefore, there is a need to understand and quantify the environmental attribute of this building system in the context of North American resources, manufacturing technology, energy constraints, building types, and construction practice. This study is to compare energy consumption of two building designs using different materials, i.e. CLT and concrete.
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Guide for Designing Energy-Efficient Building Enclosures for Wood-Frame Multi-Unit Residential Buildings in Marine to Cold Climate Zones in North America

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2620
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Finch, Graham
Wang, J.
Ricketts, D.
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Keywords
Thermal Performance
Multi-Family
Residential Buildings
Energy Efficiency
Building Code
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The Guide for Designing Energy-Efficient Building Enclosures for Wood-Frame Multi-Unit Residential Buildings in Marine to Cold Climate Zones in North America was developed by FPInnovations in collaboration with RDH Building Engineering Ltd., the Homeowner Protection Office, Branch of BC Housing, and the Canadian Wood Council. The project is part of efforts within the Advanced Building Systems Program of FPInnovations to assemble and add to the knowledge base regarding Canadian wood products and building systems. The team of the Advanced Building Systems Program works with members and partners of FPInnovations to address critical technical issues that threaten existing markets for wood products or which limit expansion or access to such new markets. This guide was developed in response to the rapidly changing energy-efficiency requirements for buildings across Canada and the United States. This guide serves two major objectives: To assist architects, engineers, designers and builders in improving the thermal performance of building enclosures of wood multi-unit residential buildings (MURBs), in response to the increasingly stringent requirements for the energy efficiency of buildings in the marine to cold climate zones in North America (U.S. DOE/ASHRAE and NECB Climate Zones 5 through 7 and parts of Zone 4); To advance MURB design practices, construction practices, and material use based on best knowledge, in order to ensure the durable performance of wood-frame building enclosures that are insulated to higher levels than traditional wood-frame construction. The major requirements for thermal performance of building enclosures are summarized (up to February 2013), including those for the following codes and standards: 2011 National Energy Code of Canada for Buildings (2011 NECB); 2013 interim update of the 2010 National Building Code of Canada (2010 NBC, Section 9.36–Energy Efficiency); 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (2012 IECC); American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1– Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (2004, 2007, and 2010 versions). In addition to meeting the requirements of the various building codes and standards, a building may need to incorporate construction practices that reflect local preferences in material use, design and construction. Regional climate differences will also affect design solutions. This guide primarily addresses above-grade walls, below-grade walls and roofs of platform wood-frame construction. It also includes information regarding thermal performance of cross-laminated timber (CLT) assemblies as well as the use of non-bearing wood-frame exterior walls (infill walls) in wood post-and-beam and concrete structures. Examples of thermal resistance calculations, building assemblies, critical interface detailing, and appropriate material selection are provided to help guide designers and builders meet the requirements of the various energy-efficiency codes and standards, achieve above-code performance, and ensure long-term durability. This guide builds on the fundamentals of building science and on information contained within the Building Enclosure Design Guide: Wood-Frame Multi-Unit Residential Buildings, published by the Homeowner Protection Office, Branch of BC Housing. This guide is based on the best current knowledge and future updates are anticipated. The guide is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice that considers specific building parameters.
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Solutions for Upper Mid-Rise and High-Rise Mass Timber Construction: High Energy Performance Six-Storey Wood-Frame Building: Field Monitoring

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2599
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Keywords
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
Indoor Environmental Conditions
Durability
Vertical Movement
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This monitoring study was initiated to collect performance data from a highly energy efficient, six-storey building located in the coastal climate of British Columbia. This work focuses on the following objectives by installing sensors during the construction: · To provide information about the indoor environment of a highly energy efficient building · To provide field data about the durability performance of an innovative high energy efficiency exterior wall solution for mid-rise wood-frame construction · To provide information on the amounts of vertical movement in wood-frame exterior walls and interior walls below a roof/roof deck
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Free
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Ecological Thermal Refurbishment with Prefabricated Timber Framed Façade Elements for Mid-Rise Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1783
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Energy Performance
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Le Levé, Clemens
Badergruber, Thomas
Beikircher, Wilfried
Kraler, Anton
Flach, Michael
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Energy Performance
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Façade
Thermal
Prefabricated
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5622-5629
Summary
The thermal refurbishment of the building stock is one of the most fundamental challenges of sustainable urban development. Particularly the use of natural and local materials gets an increasing relevance, regarding the embodied energy. The focus of this work is the development of systematised solutions for thermal refurbishment with...
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Timber Based Prefabricated Single Modular Housing: A Brief Comparison to the Auto Industry

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2137
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

The Environmental Impact of Reused CLT Panels: Study of a Single-Storey Commercial Building In Japan

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2377
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Passarelli, Rafael
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Korea
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Keywords
Global Warming Potential
Commercial
Panels
Carbon
Design for Reuse
Timber Cascade
Life-Cycle Assessment
LCA
Construction
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The study investigates the environmental benefits of reusing Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) panels. The Global Warming Potential (GWP) of a single-stored Coffee shop built in 2016 in Kobe city was calculated, considering different CLT reuse ratios, forest land-use and material substitution possibilities. The results showed that as the rate of reused CLT panel increases the total GWP decreases. Moreover, in all cases, the option with smallest GWP is when the surplus wood is used for carbon storage in the forest, revealing the importance of a growing forest for increasing the environmental benefits of timber utilisation. The results suggest the systematic reuse of CLT panels offers a possibility to increase the carbon stock of Japanese Cedar plantation forests and further mitigate the environmental impact of construction.
Online Access
Free
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High Energy Performance Six-Storey Wood-Frame Building: Field Monitoring

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1918
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Energy Performance
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Roofs
Rooms
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Roofs
Rooms
Topic
Energy Performance
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Durability
Vertical Movement
Indoor Environmental Conditions
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This monitoring study aims to generate field performance data from a highly energy efficient building in the west coast climate as part of FPInnovations’ efforts to assist the building sector in developing durable and energy efficient wood-based buildings. A six-storey mixed-use building, with five storeys of wood-frame residential construction on top of concrete commercial space was completed in early 2018 in the City of Vancouver. It was designed to meet the Passive House standard. The instrumentation aimed to gather field data related to the indoor environment, building envelope moisture performance, and vertical movement to address the most critical concerns among practitioners for such buildings.
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Free
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10 records – page 1 of 1.